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In the sun-time, when the world is bounding forward full of life, we cannot stay to sigh and sulk ... but if the misfortune... Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, May 26, 2021 12:00:00 AM
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In the sun-time, when the world is bounding forward full of life, we cannot stay to sigh and sulk ... but if the misfortune comes at 10PM, we read poetry or sit in the dark and think what a hollow world this is.

Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927)
ibj_ldn
Posted: Wednesday, May 26, 2021 6:54:18 AM

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THE IDLE THOUGHTS OF AN IDLE FELLOW

A BOOK FOR AN IDLE HOLIDAY

BY JEROME K. JEROME
AUTHOR OF “THREE MEN IN A BOAT,” ETC.

1890


ON BEING IN THE BLUES.

(...)

By the way, it never does come except in the evening. In the sun-time, when the world is bounding forward full of life, we cannot stay to sigh and sulk. The roar of the working day drowns the voices of the elfin sprites that are ever singing their low-toned miserere in our ears. In the day we are angry, disappointed, or indignant, but never “in the blues,” and never melancholy. When things go wrong at 10 o’clock in the morning, we—or rather you—swear and knock the furniture about; but if the misfortune comes at 10 p.m., we read poetry, or sit in the dark, and think what a hollow world this is.

(...)

https://fiftywordsforsnow.com/ebooks/idle/
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, May 26, 2021 7:51:01 AM

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Context: Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow

CHAPTER 3

ON BEING IN THE BLUES.


The symptoms of the infirmity are much the same in every case, but the affliction itself is variously termed. The poet says that "a feeling of sadness comes o'er him." 'Arry refers to the heavings of his wayward heart by confiding to Jimee that he has "got the blooming hump." Your sister doesn't know what is the matter with her to-night. She feels out of sorts altogether and hopes nothing is going to happen. The every-day young man is "so awful glad to meet you, old fellow," for he does "feel so jolly miserable this evening." As for myself, I generally say that "I have a strange, unsettled feeling to-night" and "think I'll go out."

By the way, it never does come except in the evening. In the sun-time, when the world is bounding forward full of life, we cannot stay to sigh and sulk. The roar of the working day drowns the voices of the elfin sprites that are ever singing their low-toned miserere in our ears. In the day we are angry, disappointed, or indignant, but never "in the blues" and never melancholy. When things go wrong at ten o'clock in the morning we--or rather you--swear and knock the furniture about; but if the misfortune comes at ten P.M., we read poetry or sit in the dark and think what a hollow world this is.

But, as a rule, it is not trouble that makes us melancholy. The actuality is too stern a thing for sentiment. We linger to weep over a picture, but from the original we should quickly turn our eyes away. There is no pathos in real misery: no luxury in real grief. We do not toy with sharp swords nor hug a gnawing fox to our breast for choice. When a man or woman loves to brood over a sorrow and takes care to keep it green in their memory, you may be sure it is no longer a pain to them. However they may have suffered from it at first, the recollection has become by then a pleasure. Many dear old ladies who daily look at tiny shoes lying in lavender-scented drawers, and weep as they think of the tiny feet whose toddling march is done, and sweet-faced young ones who place each night beneath their pillow some lock that once curled on a boyish head that the salt waves have kissed to death, will call me a nasty cynical brute and say I'm talking nonsense; but I believe, nevertheless, that if they will ask themselves truthfully whether they find it unpleasant to dwell thus on their sorrow, they will be compelled to answer "No." Tears are as sweet as laughter to some natures. The proverbial Englishman, we know from old chronicler Froissart, takes his pleasures sadly, and the Englishwoman goes a step further and takes her pleasures in sadness itself.

Read more? http://www.literaturepage.com/read/idlethoughts-20.html
Mehrdad77
Posted: Wednesday, May 26, 2021 7:51:31 AM

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Love is like the measles; we all have to go through it.



Jerome K. Jerome
Mehrdad77
Posted: Wednesday, May 26, 2021 7:52:30 AM

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We drink one another's health and spoil our own.



Jerome K. Jerome
Ashwin Vemuri
Posted: Wednesday, May 26, 2021 9:29:34 AM

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Jerome was inspired by his older sister Blandina's love for the theatre, and he decided to try his hand at acting in 1877, under the stage name Harold Crichton. He joined a repertory troupe that produced plays on a shoestring budget, often drawing on the actors' own meagre resources – Jerome was penniless at the time – to purchase costumes and props. After three years on the road with no evident success, the 21-year-old Jerome decided that he had enough of stage life and sought other occupations. He tried to become a journalist, writing essays, satires, and short stories, but most of these were rejected. Over the next few years, he was a school teacher, a packer, and a solicitor's clerk. Finally, in 1885, he had some success with On the Stage – and Off (1885), a comic memoir of his experiences with the acting troupe, followed by Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow (1886), a collection of humorous essays which had previously appeared in the newly founded magazine, Home Chimes,[4] the same magazine that would later serialise Three Men in a Boat.[4]

On 21 June 1888, Jerome married Georgina Elizabeth Henrietta Stanley Marris ("Ettie"), nine days after she divorced her first husband. She had a daughter from her previous, five-year marriage nicknamed Elsie (her actual name was also Georgina). The honeymoon took place on the Thames "in a little boat,"[5] a fact that was to have a significant influence on his next and most important work, Three Men in a Boat.
Bully_rus
Posted: Wednesday, May 26, 2021 9:30:41 AM
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Daemon wrote:
In the sun-time, when the world is bounding forward full of life, we cannot stay to sigh and sulk ... but if the misfortune comes at 10PM, we read poetry or sit in the dark and think what a hollow world this is.

Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927)


Yeah. But actually, do you think a change of mood is a good or bad thing? If there’s such a thing as actually… Right?
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Wednesday, May 26, 2021 1:06:49 PM

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That's life. Non one can go singing all his life.
Verv
Posted: Wednesday, May 26, 2021 11:00:51 PM
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This is really interesting in the sense that it really speaks to late 19th century life and the way that people felt life & events could really pass them by...

This feeling, I think, is perhaps universal, but is maybe uniquely impactful to modern people who really can watch real events flash by them as spectators... It can feel like your whole life is just an exercise in observation.
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