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Usage of "vide" Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Saturday, May 1, 2021 2:17:52 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 7,062
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Vide my last email, please help to edit the following:

Do native speakers use "Vide" in their emails as shown above?

Thanks!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Saturday, May 1, 2021 6:01:10 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 43,685
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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
It is used, but not very often. It sounds quite formal, usually not used in emails.

"Vide my previous posts..." sounds like I were a politician.

Edit: As you know, I'm not a native ;-)
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, May 1, 2021 6:51:48 AM

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Joined: 3/30/2016
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Don’t worry JJ I agree it’s not something that’s commonly used, and not on emails.
It’s very formal language for business, academia or legal circles.
tautophile
Posted: Saturday, May 1, 2021 10:42:48 AM
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Joined: 3/14/2018
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"Vide" is Latin for "see". It's quite old-fashioned, formal, and academic, so it's almost never used these days by native speakers. You might find it in legal documents.

The abbreviation "q.v." (Latin for "quod vide", meaning "which see") is still fairly common in some varieties of ordinary English, though much rarer than that other well-known Latin abbreviation, "etc.", for "et cetera", meaning "and the others" or "and the rest". "Etc." (or its old-fashioned version "&c.") is very common even in informal English.

The Latin "vide" is not to be confused with the French word "vide", meaning "empty".
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, May 1, 2021 6:04:08 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 35,085
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Gosh!
This is one I've never seen, even in very formal printed letters from lawyers or the government.

I know enough Latin to realise that it would mean "Please see", but most people wouldn't.

I have seen "q.v." but very rarely.
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, May 2, 2021 11:31:01 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 15,744
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I've never seen it used, either. About the only Latin I recall seeing used for something like this is: cf., which is Latin for "compare", used in the sense of "see this for comparison", but this is rare outside formal writing.
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