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Daemon
Posted: Friday, April 30, 2021 12:00:00 AM
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Joined: 3/7/2009
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Location: Inside Farlex computers
sleight

(noun) Adroitness in using the hands.

Synonyms: dexterity

Usage: Only through his unequaled sleight can the juggler manage to keep eight chainsaws safely aloft.
lazarius
Posted: Friday, April 30, 2021 2:50:54 AM

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Joined: 8/27/2016
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Location: Kotel’niki, Moskovskaya, Russia
Daemon wrote:


Quote:
Surely a curious thing. That I should innocently take a bad half-crown of somebody else's manufacture is reasonable enough; but that I should knowingly reckon the spurious coin of my own make as good money! An obliging stranger, under pretence of compactly folding up my bank-notes for security’s sake, abstracts the notes and gives me nutshells; but what is his sleight of hand to mine, when I fold up my own nutshells and pass them on myself as notes!

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Great Expectations, by Charles Dickens

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Mehrdad77
Posted: Friday, April 30, 2021 3:01:40 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/22/2014
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Location: Tehrān, Tehran, Iran
The noun sleight refers to being able to use your hands with ease, especially when doing a trick. Sleight is often used in the phrase "sleight of hand." If you are a good magician, you can make a coin disappear with sleight of hand.

Mehrdad77
Posted: Friday, April 30, 2021 3:03:10 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/22/2014
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Location: Tehrān, Tehran, Iran
The noun sleight refers to cunning or cleverness, especially when used to trick or deceive. You can use a sleight of mind to trick yourself into believing that if you eat a box of cookies at dinnertime, it counts as dinner. The word sleight has a long history and comes from the Middle English word sleghth, which also meant "cunning." Back then, people would have pronounced the "gh" — even though today we don't.
Mehrdad77
Posted: Friday, April 30, 2021 3:04:24 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/22/2014
Posts: 1,830
Neurons: 512,259
Location: Tehrān, Tehran, Iran
sleight (n.)
"cunning," early 14c. alteration of sleahthe (c. 1200), from Old Norse sloegð "cleverness, cunning, slyness," from sloegr (see sly). Meaning "skill, cleverness, dexterity" is from late 14c. Meaning "feat or trick requiring quickness and nimbleness of the hands" is from 1590s. Term sleight of hand is attested from c. 1400.
monamagda
Posted: Friday, April 30, 2021 10:46:46 AM

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Joined: 2/4/2014
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Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Friday, April 30, 2021 11:07:49 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/1/2017
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Location: Casablanca, Grand Casablanca, Morocco
"Women are like tricks by sleight of hand, Which, to admire, we should not understand."

William Congreve
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