mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
Make a fool out of them Options
Penz
Posted: Saturday, April 3, 2021 10:52:26 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 288
Neurons: 1,775
Is it right to say?
He made a fool out of them.
As "a fool" is singular and "them" is plural.
thar
Posted: Saturday, April 3, 2021 1:03:24 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 24,024
Neurons: 97,376
Do you know that 'them' is plural here?
'Them' can be singular.
Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Saturday, April 3, 2021 7:01:29 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/4/2015
Posts: 5,886
Neurons: 1,302,153
Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
I think it would be more common to hear, either, "He made fools out of them", or, "He made them out to be fools."
sureshot
Posted: Saturday, April 3, 2021 9:17:50 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2015
Posts: 2,847
Neurons: 462,014
Penz wrote:
Is it right to say?
He made a fool out of them.
As "a fool" is singular and "them" is plural.


-------------------

The phrase "make a fool (out) of" means "trick or deceive (someone) so that they look foolish". If you make a fool of someone, you make them seem silly or ridiculous. The expression conveys a sense similar to the phrase "make an ass or monkey out of". One can trick or deceive a person or a group of persons so that they look foolish. Therefore, the object of the preposition "of" in the given phrase can be a singular or a plural.

Here are some examples from Corpus of Contemporary American English and other sources:

- And in return you made a fool out of me. (The object of the preposition "of" is singular)
- We were dreary and would have made fools of ourselves. (The object of the preposition "of" is plural)
- She made a fool (out) of me by insulting me in front of my friends. (The object of the preposition "of" is singular)
- We were dreary and would have made fools of ourselves.
- Come on, you made a fool of me once already. (The object of the preposition "of" is singular)
- Karl Rove has made a fool out of some very wealthy and powerful people. (The object of the preposition "of" is plural)
- Some realize they made a fool out of themselves by taking a stance easily proven wrong... so they crawl back in their holes to hide for awhile. (The object of the preposition "of" is plural)
- I think it is all to obvious who has actually made a fool of themselves. (The object of the preposition "of" is plural)
- Everyone who made a fool of themselves during the 2012 presidential race held a degree from an accredited university. (The object of the preposition "of" is plural)
thar
Posted: Sunday, April 4, 2021 1:53:23 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 24,024
Neurons: 97,376
Wilmar (USA) 1M wrote:
I think it would be more common to hear, either, "He made fools out of them", or, "He made them out to be fools."


Yes, as each one is idiomatic these mean two different things.

Made fools out of = tricked, deceived
Made out to be = portrayed as, reported that they were
Tara2
Posted: Sunday, April 4, 2021 1:00:28 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 3,553
Neurons: 13,051
Bathcoup
Posted: Monday, April 5, 2021 1:13:27 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 2/24/2021
Posts: 59
Neurons: 1,517
Tara2 wrote:

What kcuf eht were you trying to say! Why did you post a blank message? To make a fool of yourself?
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.