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Ivan Fadeev
Posted: Friday, March 19, 2021 3:21:01 PM

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Joined: 2/21/2015
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What does "mark" mean here?

SHE CHALKED UP A MARK AGAINST DAVE.
FounDit
Posted: Friday, March 19, 2021 7:04:50 PM

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Ivan Fadeev wrote:
What does "mark" mean here?

SHE CHALKED UP A MARK AGAINST DAVE.


Without more context, I would guess this refers to the idea of keeping a score of someone's mistakes, or faults.

In some games, such as pool, a chalkboard is available for keeping score. This idea is also used as a metaphor for keeping score when deciding if another person is someone you want to keep company with.

Often, we put one finger in the air and make a motion like marking a chalkboard, and say something like, "That's one", meaning one mark for, or against something. Another phrase sometimes used, is "Score one" (for or against). Your facial expression shows if its positive or negative.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, March 19, 2021 7:19:18 PM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
In English these are often called tally marks.
They are often grouped in fives.


5 is marked by 4 vertical lines and one diagonal one.
Ivan Fadeev
Posted: Saturday, March 20, 2021 1:47:02 AM

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Is it possible to "chalk disappointment up against someone"? To mean that they disappointed you and you want to remember that.
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, March 20, 2021 10:49:04 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 15,647
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Ivan Fadeev wrote:
Is it possible to "chalk disappointment up against someone"? To mean that they disappointed you and you want to remember that.


Yes, you can, but I'd normally say, "chalk up marks of disappointment", rather than "chalk up disappointments". You chalk up marks, and the marks would then stand for things either good or bad.
The One And Only Emily
Posted: Thursday, March 25, 2021 12:35:05 PM

Rank: Newbie

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Location: College Station, Texas, United States
FounDit Wrote:
Yes, you can, but I'd normally say, "chalk up marks of disappointment", rather than "chalk up disappointments". You chalk up marks, and the marks would then stand for things either good or bad.

Yes, so it means here that a mark is like a point of either something bad or good.
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