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else or one more Options
Julya
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 9:50:55 AM
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I want to meet you else.
I want to meet you once more .
"""""""""""
What is correct? And why? Where does the "else" need to stand in the sentence?
thar
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 9:59:23 AM

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else does not really fit here at all. It means alternative, another way. There are no choices here.

I want to meet you once more
=
I want to meet you one more time
I want to meet you again.

nothing to do with else, that I can think of.

you would not say 'I want to meet you else' it makes no sense. Are you sure you do not mean another word?
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 10:05:13 AM

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You could possibly say "I want to meet you or else!" (...or something terrible happens! Used as a threat.)

Like thar I can't think any other rational use of "else" here.
Julya
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 10:15:44 AM
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thar wrote:
else does not really fit here at all. It means alternative, another way. There are no choices here.


you would not say 'I want to meet you else' it makes no sense. Are you sure you do not mean another word?
I understood what you meant. Very often the same word means the different meanings. In your language there are such words also.
So, can i use the "else" in the sentence? ---> I don't like this coat, give me else. (I mean another one)
thar
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 10:33:23 AM

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almost

else in this usage is an adjective, so
I do not like this coat, give me another one.

Any examples I can think of do not use else without a pronoun in this particular usage - something, somebody, somewhere, nothing, nowhere, nobody, anything etc
I do not like this, give me something else.
that is the only one, there is nothing else here.
RuthP
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 10:55:11 AM

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In AE, one might hear

"I don't like this coat, please find me something else."

I think "another one" or "a different one" would be more common, but "something else" would not sound odd.
RuthP
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 11:15:52 AM

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There is a rather old-fashioned construction which reminds me of what you seem to be trying to do.

"I must finish this report by tomorrow morning else my boss will be very unhappy."

This would uniformly be "or else", now, not just "else".

Interestingly (at least it is interesting to me), I am not convinced your usage is wrong. I think grammatically you may be able to say " . . . please give me else", in the strict meaning of the word. (Grammar experts, I await your input. Where is Grammargeek when you need her?)

However, I can say absolutely, beyond any shadow of a doubt that it would mark you as a non-native speaker. In many cases the person with whom you were speaking would not understand what you were trying to say.
Ava
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 12:02:53 PM

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You can say, though it isn't common, "I want to meet you elsewhere." Much more common would be "somewhere else."
Julya
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 12:58:53 PM
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OKKK!
Julya
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 5:06:19 PM
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Ava wrote:
You can say, though it isn't common, "I want to meet you elsewhere." Much more common would be "somewhere else."

What about: I want to meet you ever else.
I want to meet you sometime else ?
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 5:23:18 PM

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Quote:
What about: I want to meet you ever else.
I want to meet you sometime else ?


These sentences make no sense.
Look at the TFD definition for else
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 5:48:30 PM

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I want to meet you ever else. This one doesn't work in English.
I want to meet you sometime else. This is fine, but is not a way most English people would use, though they would understand it - you could also say "I want to meet you some other time" or "... another time." or "... later."

'Else' is an adjective or adverb so always describes or qualifies a verb, noun, adjective or adverb.

To say "I don't like this coat, give me else", you are using it as a noun, so it doesn't work. You would usually say "...give me something else." or "...give me another(/another one)."

I suppose to be perfectly strictly grammatical, one could say "...give me a coat else." but I have never, never heard that. Shame on you As thar wrote, 'else' in this use seems to always be used with 'something', 'nothing', 'somewhere' or some other similar pronoun.
It seems to be a usage thing rather than a grammar point - if you use an actual noun, you use 'another' or 'some other'.
I think that answers RuthP's question too.

Julya
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 6:09:19 PM
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
[color=blue]

'Else' is an adjective or adverb so always describes or qualifies a verb, noun, adjective or adverb.




I want to meet you ever else. "Ever" is adverb . why is it impossible to use "Else" after "adverb"? (like after "somewhere"?)
Briton
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 7:18:19 PM
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This thread is too complicated for me, I think I'll go somewhere else.
leonAzul
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 7:31:35 PM

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Julya wrote:
Drag0nspeaker wrote:


'Else' is an adjective or adverb so always describes or qualifies a verb, noun, adjective or adverb.


I want to meet you ever else. "Ever" is adverb . why is it impossible to use "Else" after "adverb"? (like after "somewhere"?)


You would need to provide a very clear context for this sentence to be intelligible. Even then, it would be heard as highly poetic language.

I am guessing that what you want to say is "I want to meet with you, but any time or place is better than the one which you suggested."
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 7:42:26 PM

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Julya wrote:
"Ever" is adverb . why is it impossible to use "Else" after "adverb"? (like after "somewhere"?)

Think
The problem here is not actually the 'else'. "I want to meet you ever." does not mean anything.

Ever means 'for all time' or 'always'. 'Meet' is something which happens briefly.
You could say "I want to meet you and stay with you for ever".
leonAzul
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 7:45:11 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:

To say "I don't like this coat, give me else", you are using it as a noun, so it doesn't work. You would usually say "...give me something else." or "...give me another(/another one)."


This is an important point. Many languages have a feature that allows one to use an adjective as a noun. English rarely works that way, and then only within a very clear context.

For example, at a restaurant, if a member of your party asks "Red or white?", it would be understood that the question means "Would you prefer red wine or white wine with dinner?" Except for a few well-defined contexts, English requires the noun to be specified.

That aside, "else" usually refers to a logical alternative, and not to a concrete alternative. One asks for "another coat" or "a different coat", and not "an else coat".
Julya
Posted: Friday, October 28, 2011 9:04:57 AM
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Thank you for your answer. You really help me .
leonAzul wrote:

Many languages have a feature that allows one to use an adjective as a noun. English rarely works that way, and then only within a very clear context.

You mean definition and subject? (not adjective and a noun) Because every second word in English is the verb and the noun and the adjective in the same time :-).
leonAzul wrote:

That aside, "else" usually refers to a logical alternative, and not to a concrete alternative. One asks for "another coat" or "a different coat", and not "an else coat".

Could one say :" Give me another coat else"? " Give me coat else?"
jmacann
Posted: Thursday, November 17, 2011 6:57:24 PM
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Certainly not -"else" implies "another", and "another" is already in the sentence.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, November 19, 2011 2:15:37 AM

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Julya wrote:
Could one say :" Give me another coat else"? " Give me coat else?"

jmacann answered the first question.

I suppose to be perfectly strictly grammatical, one could say "...give me a coat else." but I have never, never heard that. Shame on you As thar wrote, 'else' in this use seems to always be used with 'something', 'nothing', 'somewhere' or some other similarly generally unspecific pronoun.
It seems to be a usage thing rather than a grammar point - if you use an actual noun, you use 'another' or 'some other'.
annied.
Posted: Wednesday, November 23, 2011 11:16:47 AM
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the only time you would see the word "else" used in terms of coats or any solid thing.. it is always preceded by the word "something" "i would like something else"
else sort of means different... the only time you here the word else in american english it is either in a "i want Something Else" aka "something Different"
or, it can be used llike this {but it is far less common this way} "we must leave now, else we miss our train" here it is used almost like the word or.. "we must leave now, or we will miss our train".. normally though, people would not say else in this way.. it is old fashioned way to speak.. pretty much the only time you hear else it is either i want/need "Something Else" or, as a threat "Or Else" which is something mostly mothers say to their children "you had better do your chores Or Else!" menacingly implying that the child will not like this particular something Else!
annied.
Posted: Wednesday, November 23, 2011 11:30:03 AM
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oh of course! silly of me to forget.".somewhere else" is as likely as "something else' anyways, see how else works?..
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