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Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, March 3, 2021 12:00:00 AM
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Hina Matsuri

Hina Matsuri is a festival for girls, celebrated in homes throughout Japan since the Edo Period (1600-1867). A set of 10 to 15 dolls (or hina), usually family heirlooms from various generations, is displayed on a stand covered with red cloth. Dressed in elaborate silk costumes, the dolls represent the emperor and empress, court ministers, and servants. In parts of Tottori Prefecture, girls make boats of straw, place a pair of paper dolls in them and set them afloat on the Mochigase River. The custom dates back to ancient times when dolls were used as talismans to exorcize evil. More...
basisunus
Posted: Wednesday, March 3, 2021 1:33:28 PM

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Felix-C185445
Posted: Wednesday, March 3, 2021 2:59:38 PM

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I found out about this in an episode of Shin Chan. They sure are into festivals.
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, March 3, 2021 5:25:16 PM

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Every year, families across Japan celebrate Hina Matsuri, otherwise known as Girls’ Day or Doll’s Day. This traditional festival, which takes place on Mar. 3, is an occasion to pray for the well-being and prosperity of little girls. It is thought that the festival has its roots in an ancient purification ceremony, in which dolls were floated down the river, taking all of the girls’ bad luck with them.

In the Edo period, Hina Matsuri was one of several sekku (seasonal festivals) celebrated in the Imperial Court, all of which were and still are marked by the enjoyment of specific food and drink. For Hina Matsuri, many indulge in hishi mochi (pink, white and green rhomboid-shaped rice cakes), shirozake (sweet white sake), chirashizushi (scattered sushi) and hamaguri no osuimono (clear clam soup). Many begin displaying their dolls from around risshun (Feb. 4), often on platforms covered in red carpet. Family dolls are hastily hidden on Mar. 4: it is said that if you put a girl’s dolls away after Hina Matsuri ends, she will marry late in life.

It is only recently that public venues have begun displaying dolls as well, focusing on dolls which express the traditions and culture of the area. These displays attract Japanese and non-Japanese tourists alike, and there are often special workshops and events held over February and March. Why not take a day trip to one of the locations in our guide? Enjoy the first days of spring and the traditional dolls and decorations native to each area!

Note: The situation regarding the spread of the COVID-19 virus changes daily. Please follow local authorities’ advice by practicing social distancing, wearing masks, and following other recommended guidelines. By sharing information about events and places to go, Fukuoka Now is NOT encouraging unsafe practices. Practice safe behavior for yourself and others.

https://www.fukuoka-now.com/en/hina-matsuri-guide/
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