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Poisonous green Options
Penz
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2021 10:00:03 PM

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Harry Potter and The Chamber of Secrets by JK Rowling.

Harry is in a dark tunnel where he finds a gigantic snake skin. He have a torch sort of light at the top of his wand.

"The light slid over a gigantic snake skin, of a vivid poisonous green, lying curled... "

I have searched online but couldn't find "poisonous green" color?
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2021 10:39:59 PM

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Penz wrote:
Harry Potter and The Chamber of Secrets by JK Rowling.

Harry is in a dark tunnel where he finds a gigantic snake skin. He have a torch sort of light at the top of his wand.

"The light slid over a gigantic snake skin, of a vivid poisonous green, lying curled... "

I have searched online but couldn't find "poisonous green" color?


You wouldn't find it, because Rowling is simply telling you the snake is poisonous. The color is not important, but in this case, she chose green. Perhaps because there is a snake that is often dark green color and is poisonous - the water moccasin, sometimes called a "cottonmouth" because the inside of its mouth is white and you see that when it is about to strike.
Penz
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2021 10:41:30 PM

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But the "poisonous" is for green? Not snake!
thar
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2021 11:59:35 PM

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It's imagination.

There is healthy green like leaves and poisonous green like pus. It is just making you think of a vidid colour that in nature would tell you something is dangerous. The colour that brings up comes from the reader's imagination.

tautophile
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2021 12:52:27 AM
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I agree with Thar. The green color that is described is not a specific hue or color of green, but one which appears ugly or unpleasant on the skin of the snake. The snake may or may not be poisonous or venomous--we don't know--but large snakes like boas and anacondas are not poisonous, but they're very dangerous...and there are snakes that have green scales.

By the way, it should be "He has a torch sort of light at the top of his wand", which I take to mean the tip of his wand puts forth a beam of light like a torch (BrE) or flashlight (AmE).
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2021 1:26:15 AM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
There is of course though the poisonous arsenic compound that is coloured green and was used in wallpapers and paints.

Woman Embroidering by Georg Friedrich Kirsting (1812)
The green pigment in the original of this painting a compound known as Scheele’s Green.

Some people claim Napoleon Bonaparte was killed by the green wallpaper in the house he was exiled to in St Helena.
So for some people the colour green is associated with poison and poisonous things.
thar
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2021 2:03:58 AM

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Yes, there is something luminous about that painting. And if you do a Google search for toxic (instead of poisonous) green, then there is definitely a glowing neon theme!






190Five
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2021 2:31:32 AM

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Location: Charlotte, North Carolina, United States
Damn. Spent all of that time typing and Sourcing a reply, but a Glitch and it ceased to be!

Like spiders, snakes aren't poisonous unless you decide to ingest their venom, but you've likely other issues needing attention if that's a hobby. Not judging, just saying!
They can be dangerous if disturbed, near young or the nest, both non & the venomous snake species'. The venomous esp. if the bite and envenomate you (some will Dry-bite as a warning & to conserve venom for prey. They make x-amt whilst hibernating and gotta last. FYI Babies don't know this yet, so they'll bite and sometimes continue pumping.) Most snakes are non-venomous but an infection from a bite isn't uncommon, and all are helpful to humans! Please don't kill something bc you're Ophidiophobic or don't know! Take time to learn about them. They're pretty cool!

Had a good theory re Green and Poisonous. Sigh. I'll try to re-type it later.
Cool question. I know this doesn't answer but hope someone learned or grew curious to learn more.

Be well,

V
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2021 3:07:23 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 2,583
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
190Five wrote:
Damn. Spent all of that time typing and Sourcing a reply, but a Glitch and it ceased to be!

Like spiders, snakes aren't poisonous unless you decide to ingest their venom, but you've likely other issues needing attention if that's a hobby. Not judging, just saying!
They can be dangerous if disturbed, near young or the nest, both non & the venomous snake species'. The venomous esp. if the bite and envenomate you (some will Dry-bite as a warning & to conserve venom for prey. They make x-amt whilst hibernating and gotta last. FYI Babies don't know this yet, so they'll bite and sometimes continue pumping.) Most snakes are non-venomous but an infection from a bite isn't uncommon, and all are helpful to humans! Please don't kill something bc you're Ophidiophobic or don't know! Take time to learn about them. They're pretty cool!

Had a good theory re Green and Poisonous. Sigh. I'll try to re-type it later.
Cool question. I know this doesn't answer but hope someone learned or grew curious to learn more.

Be well,

V


No that’s absolutely true it’s good to add more information to a question.
thar
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2021 4:51:34 AM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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Some snakes are poisonous, they are just finding out. The tiger keelback snake eats toads and keeps poison from them in a gland. When threatened it exudes the toxin.

Not neon - but it is a suspiciously murky green colour!



Quote:




Tiger keelback snakes are usually less than a metre long, an ideal meal for many birds and mammals. But they eat toxic toads and store the toxins in specialised organs on the backs of their necks called nuchal glands.

If a snake is threatened it arches its neck, making the nuchal gland area more prominent. A predator that bit the snake’s neck would probably get a jet of fluid from the glands straight in the mouth or face, which would be distasteful or even painful.

But not all keelbacks exhibit this defensive behaviour. Snakes from a toad-free island flee when attacked, rather than standing their ground. Now it seems the snakes know whether or not they are armed with toxins.

Akira Mori of Kyoto University, Japan, and Gordon Burghardt of the University of Tennessee in Knoxville reared hatchling snakes from toad-free and toad-rich Japanese islands. The snakes were fed controlled diets containing toxic toads – or not.

When snakes from the toad-free island were fed toads, they started responding to threats with nuchal gland displays, rather than slithering away.

Know thyself
“So far as I know, this is the only example in terrestrial vertebrates where there is some indication that animals act as if they are aware of when they are toxic and when they are not,” says Burghardt.

Apart from snakes, plenty of animals acquire toxins from what they eat, but Burghardt says there is no sign they change their behaviour depending on what they have eaten. “Poison dart frogs in captivity are not fed the types of food that make them toxic, but their behaviour towards predators does not seem to have changed at all,” he says.

“It is remarkable that the researchers were able to demonstrate not only a difference in behaviour between these two populations, but that if you feed toads to toxin-free snakes, they are able to adjust their behaviour in a manner consistent with being chemically defended,” says Alan Savitzky of Utah State University in Logan.

How they know is an open question. The snakes could somehow monitor the amount of toxin in their glands. Alternatively, they might detect changes in the microbial community living in their digestive system, which would be influenced by toxin levels.



Read more: https://www.newscientist.com/article/2149529-this-snake-knows-how-toxic-it-is-and-fights-only-when-armed/#ixzz6nl3Kobch


Source https://www.newscientist.com/article/2149529-this-snake-knows-how-toxic-it-is-and-fights-only-when-armed/
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