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£3 19 11-3/4 Options
lazarius
Posted: Friday, February 19, 2021 12:31:00 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/27/2016
Posts: 1,077
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Location: Kotel’niki, Moskovskaya, Russia
These three quotes come from The Tale of Ginger and Pickles, 1909, by Beatrix Potter:

Quote:
“Let us send in the bill again to Samuel Whiskers, Ginger, he owes 22/9 for bacon.”

Quote:
“What is seven pounds of butter at 1/3, and a stick of sealing wax and four matches?”

Quote:
“No,” replied Ginger, who had opened the envelope, “it is the rates and taxes, £3 19 11-3/4.”

I think I have the last one right - 3 pounds 19 shillings 11 pence and 3 farthings. It's the other two that I cannot surmount.

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thar
Posted: Friday, February 19, 2021 1:45:24 PM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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Shillings and pence

Twenty-two [shillings] and nine [pence]


One and thruppence (if that is how you would say it) a pound

The tax - did they only have four pounds? Because that is as close as you can get and still have some money left!



lazarius
Posted: Friday, February 19, 2021 2:11:32 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/27/2016
Posts: 1,077
Neurons: 1,412,346
Location: Kotel’niki, Moskovskaya, Russia
thar wrote:
One and thruppence (if that is how you would say it)

Yes, tuppence and thruppence are good words.

Thank you.

thar wrote:
The tax - did they only have four pounds? Because that is as close as you can get and still have some money left!

I'm afraid they didn't have a farthing.

Quote:
Ginger and Pickles gave unlimited credit.

Now the meaning of “credit” is this — when a customer buys a bar of soap, instead of the customer pulling out a purse and paying for it — she says she will pay another time.

And Pickles makes a low bow and says, “With pleasure, madam,” and it is written down in a book.

The customers come again and again, and buy quantities, in spite of being afraid of Ginger and Pickles.

But there is no money in what is called the “till.”

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The Tale of Ginger and Pickles, 1909, by Beatrix Potter

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tautophile
Posted: Friday, February 19, 2021 8:26:20 PM
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Joined: 3/14/2018
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Seven pounds of butter at 1/3" presumably means "...at 1 shilling and 3 pence per pound (or 15d per pound). That would total 7 shillings and 21 pence or 105 pence or 8 shillings and 9 pence or £ -/8/9 or 8s 9d.

"...he owes 22/9 for the bacon" means 22 shillings 9 pence (22s 9d), which is £1 2s 9d or £1/2/9.

I have not translated the above £sd amounts into decimal. One shilling = 12 old pence = 5 (new) pence = 5p.

One (old) penny (1d) = two halfpennies (ha'p'nnies) or 4 farthings. There were thus 960 farthings in £1
When Britain went decimal in the late '60s, the pound was divided into 100 new pence. £1 = 100p. Thus 1 (new) penny = £0.01 or 2.4d. (There used to be a decimal half-penny worth £0.005 but it has since been abolished.)

Other coins
A threepenny (or thrupenny) bit was a coin worth three old pence (3d). 80 threepenny coins = £1.
A long time ago there was a coin worth 4d called a groat.
A sixpence or tanner was a coin worth 6d or half a shilling. £1 = 40 sixpences
A shilling (1s) was a coin worth 12d or 2 sixpences or 4 threepences, or 48 farthings, or £0.05. There is now a 5p coin that replaces but is the same as the old shilling.
A florin was a coin worth two shillings (2s) or 24d, or a tenth of a pound sterling.
A half-crown was a coin worth two and a half shillings or 2 shillings 6 pence (2s 6d) or 1/8th of a pound sterling.
A crown was a coin worth 5 shillings or a quarter of a pound sterling, for a long time minted as commemorative coins only.
After decimalisation, the older coins (3d, 6d, half-crown, etc) were no longer used; and a new coin worth 50p or half a pound sterling was introduced.

A pound sterling was worth 240 old pence (240d) or 20 shillings. A sovereign was a gold coin worth this amount.
A guinea was a money of account worth a varying amount, eventually set as 21 shilling or £1 1s, or, in decimal £1.05.
In medieval times, a "mark" was a money of account worth 1/3rd of a pound sterling or 80d or 6s 8d.

Complicated, isn't it?

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