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analgesic Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, February 4, 2021 12:00:00 AM
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Joined: 3/7/2009
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analgesic

(noun) A medicine used to relieve pain.

Synonyms: anodyne, painkiller

Usage: An over-the-counter analgesic is not going to suffice for this pain.
thar
Posted: Thursday, February 4, 2021 1:54:42 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 24,016
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Ancient Greek ἄλγος (álgos, “pain”).

Ancient Greek ἄλγησις (álgēsis, “sense of pain”)
> Neuralgia, fibromyalgia,
ἀν- (an-, “without”) + ἄλγησις - without a sense of pain
New Latin analgesia
English analgesia

Non-mdical term
Painkiller
Which when you think about it is actually quite a violent and anthropomorphic concept!

I think AmE seems to use analgesic more in common speech (maybe they are just more used to taking pills) but in BrE it is purely a medical term. I am sure a lot of people wouldn't know what it means.


The Greeks being Greek had another word for pain
Ancient Greek ὀδύνη (odúnē, “pain”).
ἀνώδυνος (anṓdunos, “free from pain”), from ἀν- (an-, “without”) + ὀδύνη (odúnē, “pain”).
Medieval Latin anōdynos (“stilling or relieving pain”),
English anodyne

> Anadin?, sensodyne?

Which I always think of as meaning bring, bland, banal.
Lacking any spark of originality or spirit. An insult

But apparently comes to that though pain- relieving
Quote:
anodyne (comparative more anodyne, superlative most anodyne)

(pharmacology) capable of soothing or eliminating pain [from 16th c.] quotations

(figuratively) soothing or relaxing [from 18th c.]
Classical music is rather anodyne.

(by extension) noncontentious, blandly agreeable, unlikely to cause offence or debate [from 20th c.]
Synonyms: bland, inoffensive, noncontentious



Some traditional painkillers
- morphine
Borrowed from French morphine or German Morphin, from Ancient Greek Μορφεύς (Morpheús, “the god and personification of dreams”).

- laudanum
From New Latin, from Latin laudō (“I praise”), or ladanum (“a gum resin”), from Ancient Greek λάδανον (ládanon). Originally the same word as ladanum, labdanum, compare French laudanum, Italian laudano, ladano. See ladanum.

Used by Paracelsus to refer to ladanum gum, and to a compound recipe containing pearls, but apparently not to any preparation of opium; this modern sense was introduced by his followers (Sigerist 1941:540–1).

- aspirin
From the German trademark Aspirin, from acetylierte Spirsäure (literally “acetylated spiraeic acid”).

- paracetamol
Contraction of para-acetylaminophenol.








thar
Posted: Thursday, February 4, 2021 1:54:44 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 24,016
Neurons: 97,340
Ancient Greek ἄλγος (álgos, “pain”).

Ancient Greek ἄλγησις (álgēsis, “sense of pain”)
> Neuralgia, fibromyalgia,
ἀν- (an-, “without”) + ἄλγησις - without a sense of pain
New Latin analgesia
English analgesia

Non-medical term
Painkiller
Which when you think about it is actually quite a violent and anthropomorphic concept!

I think AmE seems to use analgesic more in common speech (maybe they are just more used to taking pills) but in BrE it is purely a medical term. I am sure a lot of people wouldn't know what it means.


The Greeks being Greek they categorise pain.
There are three types of 'algea' pain:
Lupe (Λύπη – "pain"),
Achos (Ἄχος – "grief"), (not related to Germanic 'ache')
Ania (Ἀνία – "sorrow").

Analgesics are not recommended for the second and third types!

Lupe (Λύπη – "pain"),
Alypon - from the Greek for "without pain a+lupe", is the name of a plant in Latin and used in its systematic name Globularia alypum. Globe daisies.
This is about a globularia species but in that family:
Quote:
The leaves are antirheumatic, laxative and stimulant[1]. The plant is a mild laxative, but it also has a beneficial effect on the stomach and is therefore preferable to many other laxatives[1].



Achos (Ἄχος – "grief")
Ache is a Germanic word, and was always 'ace, ake' until Samuel John mistakenly thought it was related to Greek Ἄχος" and spelt it with a 'che' in his dictionary in 1755.
Which is why it is now spelt 'ache' in modern English.

Quote:

Old English acan
From Proto-Germanic *akaną.
Verb
acan
to ache
Middle English: aken
English: ache
Scots: ake



There is also another set of Greek pain:
Ancient Greek ὀδύνη (odúnē, “pain”).
ἀνώδυνος (anṓdunos, “free from pain”), from ἀν- (an-, “without”) + ὀδύνη (odúnē, “pain”).
Medieval Latin anōdynos (“stilling or relieving pain”),
> odynophagia - painful swallowing
and
English anodyne
> Anadin?, sensodyne?

Which I always think of as meaning boring, bland, banal.
lacking any spark of originality or rebellious spirit. An insult

But apparently comes to that though pain- relieving
Quote:
anodyne (comparative more anodyne, superlative most anodyne)
(pharmacology) capable of soothing or eliminating pain [from 16th c.]
(figuratively) soothing or relaxing [from 18th c.]
Classical music is rather anodyne.

(by extension) noncontentious, blandly agreeable, unlikely to cause offence or debate [from 20th c.]
Synonyms: bland, inoffensive, noncontentious












monamagda
Posted: Thursday, February 4, 2021 10:50:28 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 8,768
Neurons: 7,550,582
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia
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