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have a monk on (BrE) Options
Mnemon
Posted: Tuesday, January 19, 2021 1:32:05 PM

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Quote:
have a monk on
(also get a monk on)
phrase
informal Northern English
Be or get annoyed; be in a bad mood.

Lexico

Have you ever heard or seen the phrase before?

To take some examples:

- Everyone at work seems to have a monk on today.

- Don't get a monk on, mate.

The phrase actually makes me think of another term,

Quote:
get (one's) monkey up
To make one angry.

https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/get+your+monkey+up

I wonder whether there is some kind of relation between the two!
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, January 19, 2021 1:57:08 PM

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No but I am from Southern England, with some ties to the North East Northumberland and Newcastle.
The slang in each of the other parts of Northern England Yorkshire, Lancashire, Cumbria etc. are all different from each other.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, January 19, 2021 2:51:37 PM

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Sounds more like Cockney rhyming slang
Monk's cowl - scowl.
Whistle
tautophile
Posted: Tuesday, January 19, 2021 11:39:37 PM
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You may be right, Thar; it sounds plausible. (I've never heard the term "have a monk on", though I'm reasonably familiar with Cockney rhyming slang.)
365er
Posted: Wednesday, January 20, 2021 5:34:22 AM

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I think that this also refers to "get your monkey up" or "get someone's monkey up" which is to be angered/disgruntled.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, January 20, 2021 6:34:11 AM

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I'm from the north-west of England, and lived in Sussex (south-east), Plymouth (south-west) and Newcastle (north-east) - and now near Edinburgh - for years each place. I've never hear the 'monk' or 'monkey' versions.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, January 20, 2021 6:46:30 AM

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If it were just from tfd I would happily say it is simply wrong. So many of the idioms they quote are just that little bit off. But from another source - have to believe it does exist, but clearly not at all common. Or not from 'the North', just one small bit of it!

Doncaster, apparently.

Quote:


Posted by RRC on May 26, 2006

In Reply to: Got the monk on posted by Marcia Allass on May 26, 2006

: Where I grew up near Doncaster the phrase "S/he's got the monk on" was commonly used to describe someone who was sulking. Any idea where this comes from?

I'm guessing it's because many monks take a vow of silence.



Sulking makes sense. Not 'being annoyed' for which the normal response is not sulking. But I suppose it could have outgrown its origin.

Anybody from the region here? The closest I know would be Jignesh in Leeds but I think the difference between South and West Yorkshire makes it highly unlikely!Whistle



Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, January 20, 2021 7:40:51 AM

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Well that is the thing about British slang, it can be highly regional.
Mnemon
Posted: Monday, January 25, 2021 2:57:24 AM

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Thank you.
The Yorkshire Post believes that it's Yorkshire slang;
See https://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/got-monk-feeling-nithered-yorkshires-strangest-slang-explained-1765018
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, January 25, 2021 3:21:57 AM

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Thanks for the link.

Several of those phrases are also extant (maybe only for the 'older folk' like me) in the eastern parts of Lancashire, east and north-east of Manchester - "Thisen" (thy self); "ginnel" (narrow alleyway between terraces of houses, sometimes only the ground floor, with the first floor being joined); "mard" or "mardy" (sulky); "Eyup", "Eyup lad", "Eyup lass" (hello); and "Bobby dazzler" (anything great, wonderful).
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