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Amarillide
Posted: Friday, November 20, 2020 12:03:04 PM
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Joined: 2/13/2020
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Hi there, 
I am looking for a good adjective that would be ideal to describe a violin learner that's imperfect and that is not interested in getting perfect. Someone that just learn for the pleasure of learning and with no consistency, and with no other aim than thrumming every now and then. 
The statement is said with a kind of self-mockery attitude, so I guess that if the word I am looking foo may sound offensive in another contest, here it should just sound ok. Of course, I am not looking for a word that conveys all that meaning ( that would be impossible, I guess), but just for something that gives an idea.

I thought something like "frivolous violin learner" "shoddy violin learner" "extra low level violin learner" "junky violin learner"... but since I haven't found any of these expressions online I thought that they may sound too weird...

I hope I'll get some ideas!
Thank you in advance,
Boo hoo!
Amarillide
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, November 20, 2020 12:21:27 PM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
If you are referring to yourself - it's OK to be a little self deprecatory, but (as you say) this could be seen to be insulting if you say it about someone else.

I'm a dilettante violin student.

dilettante - n
1. a person whose interest in a subject is superficial rather than professional (Collins)
adj. n.
1. a person who takes up an art, activity, or subject merely for amusement, esp. in a desultory or superficial way (Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary)

OR
I dabble in playing the violin.

dabble
2. (intr; usually foll by in, with, or at) to deal (with) or work (at) frivolously or superficially; play (at) - (Collins)
Amarillide
Posted: Friday, November 20, 2020 12:42:16 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/13/2020
Posts: 128
Neurons: 836
Thank you for your quick reply DragOnspeaker,
and for the new expression, I have just learned "to dabble in something"! Lovely.
Also, reading your replies, I have just realized that I am looking for a more deprecative term!
Of course, I am talking about me Anxious , and I would like to stress the self denigratory tone... I don't know why... maybe because I list the activity among my "trivial (or frivolous, I don't know yet) endeavors": I suspect this last expression sounds a bit higher register, and I like how it would clash with a lower image afterward... something like "among my trivial endeavors I can list being a shoddy violin learner and..." 

Thank you for bearing with me!
Ama
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, November 21, 2020 11:35:30 AM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Self-denigration is a speciality subject - the English are famous for it!

"I dabble a bit in playing the violin - I wrote a little ditty last week." (goes on to play an amazingly complicated dance-tune perfectly, at double speed) "It's not bad, really, just an amateur attempt."

Some of the synonyms of "frivolous" look quite good.

trivial, petty, trifling, unimportant, light, minor, shallow, pointless, niggling, paltry, impractical.

Shoddy is a bit more seriously imperfect - "among my trivial endeavors I can list being a shoddy violin learner and..." sounds good to me.
Romany
Posted: Saturday, November 21, 2020 3:59:55 PM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

As for me, I say things like:

"Oh I mess about with X sometimes"
"I like playing around with X from time to time."
"Every once in a while I fiddle about with X" (if x did represent a violin that is a deliberate pun.)

When you use "from time to time/sometimes/every once in a while" it suggests you aren't of professional standard.If you were you would have to be engaging in it every day.(But neither does it define what YOU consider these phrases to mean; nor whether you are using them sardonically.)

Describing the activity in ways that suggest momentary, not very skilful concerns, "fiddling about", "playing around with", "mess about with" suggest you don't rate your skill very highly.
thar
Posted: Saturday, November 21, 2020 4:25:13 PM

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Playing the fiddle would often be interpreted as not being a serious violin player. Even though folk musicians who play "the fiddle" may be excellent musicians.
Hope123
Posted: Saturday, November 21, 2020 9:42:33 PM

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Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
I say my art is just a hobby. (And it is.)

Edited -to putter, amateur was mentioned, a novice
Amarillide
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 7:55:51 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/13/2020
Posts: 128
Neurons: 836
Drag0nspeaker wrote:


"among my trivial endeavors I can list being a shoddy violin learner and..." sounds good to me.


That's cool, this was my first take, but sometimes, when I have to write in English I become extremely unconfident, I feel like everything I write may sound weird! Thank you!

Romany wrote:

 "Every once in a while I fiddle about with X" (if x did represent a violin that is a deliberate pun.)


That's a nice one, but as a nonmother tongue I often refrain to play too much around with language (at least for now): the reason is that, on many occasions, I have noticed that when a use a pun or an intentional slightly unusual combination of words (for example splitting common occurrences) is often perceived as a mistake... but I'll keep it aside for the future! Dancing

All of your posts have something new and interesting, thank you, everyone, for the nice suggestions and new expressions! 
Take care... now I'll go back pottering aroundAngel
Xx
Ama
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 9:02:08 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Well, now that you're settled, I'll add some data which even some professional violinists don't know . . .

A fiddle is not the same as a violin. It's built differently and it's played differently - but from a distance, they look alike.

A violin is played, most usually one string at a time. The angle at which the bow is held determines which string vibrates at any one time.
The "bridge" is arched to make this easier.

The fiddle is often played two or three strings at a time - a chord for each 'note' in the tune. The bridge is flatter to make this possible.



Have a look at this old video.

It starts with two violins (Dave Pegg and Dave Swarbrick), then at about 1:03, Simon Nicol joins in on fiddle (and Dave Mattacks, the drummer, playing bass guitar). The sound and style are very different.



Hope you like it.
Hope123
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 11:27:47 AM

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Thanks, Drago for that post - and thanks to all other contributors! I learn something new every day on this Forum!
Romany
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 2:01:24 PM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom



Amarillide,

I don't blame you in the slightest to steer away from word-play until you're sure you know enough to make you feel confident.

But there's one nice thing about a pun. It doesn't matter whether you get it right or wrong: if it's wrong it won't be a pun; so no-one'll know you were attempting it.Applause

But a pun isn't meant to be obvious. i.e. you don't stop after you've made one and wait for everybody to laugh. You don't 'perform' them for other people's benefit. They usually pop into your mind unconsciously and amuse you, yourself, and so come out on your tongue. If no-one ever picks up on it, it doesn't matter in the slightest. You feel rather pleased with yourself for thinking of it, and that's fine. (Even though often, you provide a pun unconsciously and don't even realise it at the time!) But, if someone else DOES happen to get it too, that's a bonus. You feel rather pleased there's someone else in the world who thinks like you do!

Puns are nice. They make you smile inside. Sometimes they make other people smile. Inside and outside.

So that's just something to add to the things you know about word play for when the time comes.Dancing

Amarillide
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 2:42:26 PM
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Joined: 2/13/2020
Posts: 128
Neurons: 836
Drag0nspeaker, you nailed it... I had no clue of these differences!
Thank you for the video!

Romany, your encomium of the Pun is actually a poem! 

I definitely endorse what Hope123 said about this blessed forum! 


Boo hoo!
Ama
Romany
Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 2:54:14 PM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Drago -

in our house, it was impossible not to be aware of the difference between fiddles & violins. Notwithstanding, and for the sake of a pun, I claim it as Acceptable in the Common Understanding.Not talking

However, for all that, I had never really explored the technicalities of the difference.

Thanks for that. Now I know.

(My criteria was that the fiddle-players cases were more bashed and battered - and more likely to be dark green - than violinists cases)
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, November 24, 2020 9:04:05 PM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi Romany!

Yeah. I don't know why 'fiddle' gives an impression of 'old and battered', but it does bring up that automatically with me too.
Even though I KNOW, analytically that some of the most expensive and 'elite' string-things are fiddles.
In the same class as the "Strad" are some of the Hardanger Fiddles - the hardingfele of Norway. There are some cheap & nasty ones (made primarily for their 'looks'), but many are real class (and in a price-range to make your eyes water!) - the four extra drone-strings add a quality of sound which is unmistakeable.



Take your choice - they're "The Devil's Music" or players are 'gifted by the fair folk'.

Hope123
Posted: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 11:40:07 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2015
Posts: 9,707
Neurons: 55,571
Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi Romany!

Yeah. I don't know why 'fiddle' gives an impression of 'old and battered', but it does bring up that automatically with me too.
Even though I KNOW, analytically that some of the most expensive and 'elite' string-things are fiddles.
In the same class as the "Strad" are some of the Hardanger Fiddles - the hardingfele of Norway. There are some cheap & nasty ones (made primarily for their 'looks'), but many are real class (and in a price-range to make your eyes water!) - the four extra drone-strings add a quality of sound which is unmistakeable.



Take your choice - they're "The Devil's Music" or players are 'gifted by the fair folk'.



Beautiful!
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