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Atatürk
Posted: Monday, November 16, 2020 5:26:57 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/25/2018
Posts: 1,821
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Location: İstoç, Istanbul, Turkey
Hi
University professor: Michael, would you please answer this question?

Michael: [answers the question]

Professor: Thank you.

Michael: You're welcome/no problem/no worries/sure/ don't mention it....


What would be the most appropriate response/s to the professor saying "thank you" in the above?



Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Monday, November 16, 2020 6:26:51 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/4/2015
Posts: 5,676
Neurons: 1,269,998
Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
You're welcome.


All the others are slang terms. Some or many people would consider them rude in certain situations.
georgew
Posted: Tuesday, November 17, 2020 12:00:34 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/13/2016
Posts: 346
Neurons: 2,164
Location: Calabasas, California, United States
Wilmar (USA) 1M wrote:
You're welcome.


All the others are slang terms. Some or many people would consider them rude in certain situations.


Especially so here, in a university classroom setting.

thar
Posted: Tuesday, November 17, 2020 4:28:25 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 23,388
Neurons: 94,875
Also, the others are for when you have done a favour for someone and they thank you, and you minimise the extend trouble they have caused you.

eg
Michael expends time and effort carrying a load of books and equipment for the lecturer.
L > Thankyou
M > You're welcome / no worries / no problem / happy to help


Just answering a question is not an onerous action done by the student for the benefit of the lecturer - the question is asked by the lecturer as part of his teaching of the student.


I personally don't like 'don't mention it' as it seems dismissive of the gratitude you have been shown. You should accept that graciously. I know it is commonly used, but I don't use it myself.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, November 17, 2020 4:35:21 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 23,388
Neurons: 94,875
Ata - can you tell me why 'lütfen' is so often translated in otherwise reasonable subtitles as 'you're welcome' when it is a plea, or a simple polite 'please'?
I have never heard it said as a response to a thankyou. It has always be a 'please!'

I know in some languages the same word does both,
eg in German
Bitte (please)
Danke (thankyou)
Bitte (acknowedging thanks)

thatenglishbloke
Posted: Tuesday, November 17, 2020 6:34:56 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 11/16/2020
Posts: 26
Neurons: 245
Speaking as a former uni lecturer, almost any response that causes the student to look up from his or her smartphone will be taken positively! Even a grunt. A nod and a smile are usually well received.
Atatürk
Posted: Tuesday, November 17, 2020 9:59:11 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/25/2018
Posts: 1,821
Neurons: 8,268
Location: İstoç, Istanbul, Turkey
thar wrote:
Ata - can you tell me why 'lütfen' is so often translated in otherwise reasonable subtitles as 'you're welcome' when it is a plea, or a simple polite 'please'?
I have never heard it said as a response to a thankyou. It has always be a 'please!'

I know in some languages the same word does both,
eg in German
Bitte (please)
Danke (thankyou)
Bitte (acknowedging thanks)



I don't why, but no Turkish translator would make such a mistake. 'lütfen' means just 'please' and nothing else. It's a very common word in all Turkish dialects and other languages such as Persian (Lutfan) with exactly the same meaning.

'lütf' means favor, and the suffix 'en/an' means 'based on'.

For "you're welcome" the most frequently used term is "rica ederim".




thar
Posted: Tuesday, November 17, 2020 10:03:54 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 23,388
Neurons: 94,875
thanks.

How odd. Maybe they are translating through German, or Russian (?), but it is very odd. Please is one of the simplest ideas, and a word even a low-level learner of English would know, let alone someone doing subtitles. But at least that has cleared up the fact, if not solved the mystery!
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, November 17, 2020 1:53:47 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 18,343
Neurons: 59,641
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Thatenglishbloke - same here.

When I saw those "You're welcome" responses I actually giggled. I can't recall any student - ever - saying "You're welcome"!

You're right: a grunt, an undefinable vibration of the vocal chords...and besides they'd be half-way out of the room already!Dancing Dancing

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