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raising the tution Options
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, November 12, 2020 11:56:28 AM

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Can you please explain the bold part?

The students object to raising the tution.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, November 12, 2020 12:01:50 PM

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Tara2 wrote:
Can you please explain the bold part?

The students object to raising the tution.


Tuition is the American word for tuition fees money paid by students to an institution like a college or university to study there.
Raising means to increase in this context.
The students object to increasing the tuition fees.
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, November 12, 2020 5:19:23 PM

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Sarrriesfan wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Can you please explain the bold part?

The students object to raising the tution.


Tuition is the American word for tuition fees money paid by students to an institution like a college or university to study there.
Raising means to increase in this context.
The students object to increasing the tuition fees.

Many thanks dear Sarries!
Sorry I still don't understand. Can you please explain 'tution' in 'tution fees'?
Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Thursday, November 12, 2020 5:23:21 PM

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tu·i·tion (to͞o-ĭsh′ən, tyo͞o-)
n.
1. A fee for instruction, especially at a college, university, or private school.

fee (fē)
n.
1. A fixed sum charged, as by an institution or by law, for a privilege: a license fee; tuition fees.

It's the money a student pays to attend a college, university, or private school.
georgew
Posted: Thursday, November 12, 2020 5:45:53 PM

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Tara2 wrote:
Can you please explain the bold part?

The students object to raising the tuition.


For example, a university charges its students the amount of $100 (tuition) to attend a given class. But the university has announced it will increase that amount to $120. That was a tuition increase.

Perhaps you are confused because "tuition fees" is a bit redundant. Yes, it is. It would be clearer to simply say "tuition."

Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, November 13, 2020 6:30:27 AM

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georgew wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Can you please explain the bold part?

The students object to raising the tuition.


For example, a university charges its students the amount of $100 (tuition) to attend a given class. But the university has announced it will increase that amount to $120. That was a tuition increase.

Perhaps you are confused because "tuition fees" is a bit redundant. Yes, it is. It would be clearer to simply say "tuition."



But not correct in British English.
Tuition is the act of teaching especially in small groups or to a single person.
Tuition fees the fees paid to someone to give tuition.

So here tuition fees is not redundant.
Romany
Posted: Friday, November 13, 2020 7:14:21 AM
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Actually, I was going to point that out.

The sentence "Raising the tuition" means there is going to be more tuition - Tutors are going to give more tutorials & lectures, students are going to attend more tutorials and lectures.

Raising the tuition fees; raising the postage fees, raising the Joining Fees, raising the Entrance Fees...all relate to paying more money for an existing service.
Tara2
Posted: Friday, November 13, 2020 7:29:47 AM

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Many thanks to you all!!!
Sarrriesfan wrote:
georgew wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Can you please explain the bold part?

The students object to raising the tuition.


For example, a university charges its students the amount of $100 (tuition) to attend a given class. But the university has announced it will increase that amount to $120. That was a tuition increase.

Perhaps you are confused because "tuition fees" is a bit redundant. Yes, it is. It would be clearer to simply say "tuition."



But not correct in British English.
Tuition is the act of teaching especially in small groups or to a single person.
Tuition fees the fees paid to someone to give tuition.

So here tuition fees is not redundant.


Romany wrote:


Actually, I was going to point that out.

The sentence "Raising the tuition" means there is going to be more tuition - Tutors are going to give more tutorials & lectures, students are going to attend more tutorials and lectures.

Raising the tuition fees; raising the postage fees, raising the Joining Fees, raising the Entrance Fees...all relate to paying more money for an existing service.

Many thanks to you both again!!!
Sorry Sarries and Rom, so have all 'tutor' and 'tution' and 'tutorials ' the same root?
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, November 13, 2020 11:46:12 AM

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Yes they derive from the same root in Latin, tutor “one who watchers over, has guardianship over”.

A tutor is paid to watch over young people, and provide them with lessons tuition, those lessons are tutorials.
Tara2
Posted: Friday, November 13, 2020 11:53:56 AM

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Sarrriesfan wrote:
Yes they derive from the same root in Latin, tutor “one who watchers over, has guardianship over”.

A tutor is paid to watch over young people, and provide the, with lessons tuition, those lessons are tutorials.

Excellent. Many thanks!!!
Romany
Posted: Friday, November 13, 2020 3:39:28 PM
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Yes they're all from the same root as Sarries said.

As this was about tertiary tuition, I was actually referring to how the terms are used in Universities:to explain "raising the tuition fees" & "Raising the tuition."

If you teach at University you are a Lecturer i.e. you give lectures on your subject to a large group of students. Those students are broken into small groups for "tutorials".i.e. After hearing and taking notes at the lectures,and before they go to the next one, students meet together in tutorials to ask questions, argue their point, learn from each other,and learn more from their Tutor - the person conducting tutorials.

If there aren't many people enrolled in the course, sometimes the Lecturer acts also as Tutor. And sometimes there are certain students whom a Lecturer wants to tutor - if they show special aptitudes.

A Tutor, however, doesn't double as a Lecturer. A Tutor gives tutorials. That's their occupation: to give Tutorials. (They're often Post-grads doing research).

Thus if tutorials rise: more people are attending tutorials, or more tutorials are being offered.Dancing
Tara2
Posted: Friday, November 13, 2020 4:22:40 PM

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Romany wrote:


Yes they're all from the same root as Sarries said.

As this was about tertiary tuition, I was actually referring to how the terms are used in Universities:to explain "raising the tuition fees" & "Raising the tuition."

If you teach at University you are a Lecturer i.e. you give lectures on your subject to a large group of students. Those students are broken into small groups for "tutorials".i.e. After hearing and taking notes at the lectures,and before they go to the next one, students meet together in tutorials to ask questions, argue their point, learn from each other,and learn more from their Tutor - the person conducting tutorials.

If there aren't many people enrolled in the course, sometimes the Lecturer acts also as Tutor. And sometimes there are certain students whom a Lecturer wants to tutor - if they show special aptitudes.

A Tutor, however, doesn't double as a Lecturer. A Tutor gives tutorials. That's their occupation: to give Tutorials. (They're often Post-grads doing research).

Thus if tutorials rise: more people are attending tutorials, or more tutorials are being offered.Dancing

How wonderfully you've explained. Many thanks dear Rom!!!
Sorry, just this question, please:
Has 'tour' aything to do with these?
Romany
Posted: Friday, November 13, 2020 7:20:54 PM
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I can't see any reason that it could

Both come from different languages and mean different things. They entered English language at different times, too.
tautophile
Posted: Friday, November 13, 2020 9:18:34 PM
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There was once a flute-player who was teaching a pair of music students how to plate the flute. His students asked him, "Do you find flute-playing harder than teaching us?"

In other words...

A tutor who tooted a flute
Tried to tutor two tooters to toot.
Said the two to the tutor,
"Is it harder to toot, or
To tutor two tooters to toot?"




Tara2
Posted: Saturday, November 14, 2020 5:29:18 AM

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Romany wrote:
I can't see any reason that it could

Both come from different languages and mean different things. They entered English language at different times, too.

Thank you so much for all the help!!!!!!!!!
Tara2
Posted: Saturday, November 14, 2020 5:30:56 AM

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Joined: 11/8/2017
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tautophile wrote:
There was once a flute-player who was teaching a pair of music students how to plate the flute. His students asked him, "Do you find flute-playing harder than teaching us?"

In other words...

A tutor who tooted a flute
Tried to tutor two tooters to toot.
Said the two to the tutor,
"Is it harder to toot, or
To tutor two tooters to toot?"





Many thanks for this difficult sentence.:)
Has 'toot' anything to do with 'tutor', please?
Audiendus
Posted: Saturday, November 14, 2020 8:40:38 AM
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Tara2 wrote:
Has 'toot' anything to do with 'tutor', please?


No, it is just a humorous play on similar-sounding words. (They sound more similar in American English, where the 'u' in 'tutor' is pronounced 'oo', rather than 'yoo' as in British English.)
Hope123
Posted: Saturday, November 14, 2020 10:29:50 AM

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Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
tautophile wrote:
There was once a flute-player who was teaching a pair of music students how to plate the flute. His students asked him, "Do you find flute-playing harder than teaching us?"

In other words...

A tutor who tooted a flute
Tried to tutor two tooters to toot.
Said the two to the tutor,
"Is it harder to toot, or
To tutor two tooters to toot?"






Good one!

::::

We all understood what the sentence means but grammatically did anyone else think the original sentence seemed as if the students were doing the raising? Or am I just being an insufferable pedant?

"The students object to raising the tuition".

I would prefer "The students object to the raising of the tuition."
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