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alpacinoutd
Posted: Friday, October 23, 2020 5:27:48 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 10/18/2020
Posts: 47
Neurons: 256
Hello all.

I want to know how different sites coming from a building site can be described.

Imagine they are constructing a building close to where you live. How would you describe those sounds?

The person who hears these noises is not fond of them.

This is what I have right now:


I could hear the sound of the angle grinder polishing the stone, the sound of the drill making a hole in the concrete and the sound of the hammer beating against the stones.


How can I make it more accurate?
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, October 24, 2020 12:12:51 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 14,643
Neurons: 69,802
alpacinoutd wrote:
Hello all.

I want to know how different sites coming from a building site can be described.

Imagine they are constructing a building close to where you live. How would you describe those sounds?

The person who hears these noises is not fond of them.

This is what I have right now:


I could hear the sound of the angle grinder polishing the stone, the sound of the drill making a hole in the concrete and the sound of the hammer beating against the stones.


How can I make it more accurate?


You have to think about the sounds and what they may remind you of hearing before. An angle grinder makes a high pitched screeching sound, so you might describe it that way.

A drill that drills into concrete must be a hammer drill since an ordinary drill won't drill into concrete. A hammer drill hammers once every half turn of the bit, so you'll hear not only the whirring of the drill but the pounding of the hammer cycle. And they are loud because of the hammering. This is often called a staccato sound because of its rapid repetition. It also has a knocking sound because of the hammering. So putting all that together, you could say you're hearing the annoyingly loud staccato knocking of the hammer drill as it breaks into concrete.

Hammering on stone produces not only a sharp and loud sound, but a popping sound as well. Also, if the stone is cracking under the blows, there will be that sound as well. Put that all together and you get the loud, popping and cracking of hammer blows on stones.
alpacinoutd
Posted: Saturday, October 24, 2020 12:01:56 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 10/18/2020
Posts: 47
Neurons: 256
So, I have written this after receiving your advice. Does it work?

I arrived home after the night shift, exhausted. I wanted to sleep for three days. Little did I know the ghastly noises from the construction site next door would deny me that. First came the high-pitched screeching of the angle grinder cutting tile. Then came the staccato knocking of the hammer drill, whirring and breaking into concrete. The crescendo came when the worker pounded hard and I could hear the stone crack under his ruthless blows.


FounDit wrote:

You have to think about the sounds and what they may remind you of hearing before. An angle grinder makes a high pitched screeching sound, so you might describe it that way.

A drill that drills into concrete must be a hammer drill since an ordinary drill won't drill into concrete. A hammer drill hammers once every half turn of the bit, so you'll hear not only the whirring of the drill but the pounding of the hammer cycle. And they are loud because of the hammering. This is often called a staccato sound because of its rapid repetition. It also has a knocking sound because of the hammering. So putting all that together, you could say you're hearing the annoyingly loud staccato knocking of the hammer drill as it breaks into concrete.

Hammering on stone produces not only a sharp and loud sound, but a popping sound as well. Also, if the stone is cracking under the blows, there will be that sound as well. Put that all together and you get the loud, popping and cracking of hammer blows on stones.
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, October 24, 2020 12:21:47 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 14,643
Neurons: 69,802
alpacinoutd wrote:
So, I have written this after receiving your advice. Does it work?
I would add two things. You omitted the hammer for that last worker, and a word ending.

I arrived home after the night shift, exhausted. I wanted to sleep for three days. Little did I know the ghastly noises from the construction site next door would deny me that. First came the high-pitched screeching of the angle grinder cutting tile. Then came the staccato knocking of the hammer drill, whirring and breaking into concrete. The crescendo came when the worker with a heavy hammer pounded so hard and I could hear the stone cracking under his ruthless blows.


FounDit wrote:

You have to think about the sounds and what they may remind you of hearing before. An angle grinder makes a high pitched screeching sound, so you might describe it that way.

A drill that drills into concrete must be a hammer drill since an ordinary drill won't drill into concrete. A hammer drill hammers once every half turn of the bit, so you'll hear not only the whirring of the drill but the pounding of the hammer cycle. And they are loud because of the hammering. This is often called a staccato sound because of its rapid repetition. It also has a knocking sound because of the hammering. So putting all that together, you could say you're hearing the annoyingly loud staccato knocking of the hammer drill as it breaks into concrete.

Hammering on stone produces not only a sharp and loud sound, but a popping sound as well. Also, if the stone is cracking under the blows, there will be that sound as well. Put that all together and you get the loud, popping and cracking of hammer blows on stones.
alpacinoutd
Posted: Saturday, October 24, 2020 1:30:08 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 10/18/2020
Posts: 47
Neurons: 256
I am grateful for your invaluable advice.Dancing

FounDit wrote:

I would add two things. You omitted the hammer for that last worker, and a word ending.

Romany
Posted: Sunday, October 25, 2020 4:57:06 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 17,933
Neurons: 58,264
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

You ended up with a good piece there, alpacinoutd, however one word stands out as not-belonging - and it's not one which refers to noise at all. It's the word "ghastly".

No matter that a lot of people DO use it incorrectly; using it to mean varying degrees of "bad" IS incorrect.

"I've had a ghastly day-to-day". Unless ghosts have been chasing you all around the house you've had a bad day, a terrible day, a stressful day, a difficult day. Not a ghastly one.

Because this word is an adjective related to the supernatural. (In fact, the two words "ghastly" and "ghostly" are pronounced in the same way in many English dialects and accents.)

"A ghastly screaming" = a scream that seemed supernatural in some way - voices from beyond the grave?
"A ghastly man" = one who looks like a corpse; or a demon.
"A ghastly noise" would make you shiver. It would be frightening; the hairs on the back of your neck would rise.

Construction workers (unfortunatelyDancing ?) rarely make the hackles on the back of our necks rise!

(In England it was once a well-known Upper-Class slang word. And even now if we are pretending to imitate Upper-Class people we use the word "ghastly" as the Universal adjective in our speech.)
alpacinoutd
Posted: Sunday, October 25, 2020 5:14:08 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 10/18/2020
Posts: 47
Neurons: 256
I see. So, I will change ghastly to terrible.

Romany wrote:

You ended up with a good piece there, alpacinoutd, however one word stands out as not-belonging - and it's not one which refers to noise at all. It's the word "ghastly".

No matter that a lot of people DO use it incorrectly; using it to mean varying degrees of "bad" IS incorrect.

"I've had a ghastly day-to-day". Unless ghosts have been chasing you all around the house you've had a bad day, a terrible day, a stressful day, a difficult day. Not a ghastly one.

Because this word is an adjective related to the supernatural. (In fact, the two words "ghastly" and "ghostly" are pronounced in the same way in many English dialects and accents.)

"A ghastly screaming" = a scream that seemed supernatural in some way - voices from beyond the grave?
"A ghastly man" = one who looks like a corpse; or a demon.
"A ghastly noise" would make you shiver. It would be frightening; the hairs on the back of your neck would rise.

Construction workers (unfortunatelyDancing ?) rarely make the hackles on the back of our necks rise!

(In England it was once a well-known Upper-Class slang word. And even now if we are pretending to imitate Upper-Class people we use the word "ghastly" as the Universal adjective in our speech.)
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