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lavash (flatbread) Options
Mnemon
Posted: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 2:42:55 PM

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Location: Enschede, Overijssel, Netherlands
Hello there,


I'm wondering whether a native speaker of English would understand if I utilized the term [lavash] in my talking!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lavash

Quote:

lavash
noun
a large, thin, soft or crisp flatbread with usually a rough surface from air bubbles

Merriam-Webster
thar
Posted: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 3:44:24 PM

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İt's a word from one particular ethnic cuisine, so probably not. İt is not a common style that has made it into general English except possibly in some areas with specific immigrant populations.

Other flat breads such as naan, chapati, injera, tortillas, matzah, yes - but İ think lavash is a bit too obscure. Unless someone is really into world food I doubt they would know the word.

My personal opinion only.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 5:01:51 PM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
I would agree it wouldn’t be recognised here in the U.K.
America though has its own food traditions so I wouldn’t rule out them understanding it.
tautophile
Posted: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 6:03:28 PM
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Thar is right. "Lavash" is not a well-known type of (flat)bread in the US. You can use the word, of course, but you would have to explain what it is, just as you might want to do if you mention "naan", "chapati", "injera", "tortillas", and "matzah". Well, maybe not tortillas and matzah: those are pretty well know, certainly better known than naan or chapati or injera.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 6:23:41 PM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
In the UK few people would not recognise naan, chipati or roti because of our links to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.
Tortillas are reasonable common, but matzah possibly less well recognised here except for Jewish people and food lovers.
Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 6:26:53 PM

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Use the terms naan, chapati, and lavash, but expect to explain (simply) what they are. People would be interested to know, if they don't already. Many know naan, but I would explain (simply) what it is. What not to do -- go into some great detail about the item.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 6:56:32 PM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom


Strangely enough lavash is commonly known in Australia - we used to make it to sell at school tuckshops. (I say 'strangely' because, being in Australasia the most common food in Australian is Asian - Vietnamese, Chinese, Thai etc.)

But lavash is probably the most popular and common bread eaten there.
Mnemon
Posted: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 7:02:59 PM

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Location: Enschede, Overijssel, Netherlands
Thank you all for your contributions and comments. I appreciate that.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 7:23:22 PM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
The question has been well answered, but a comment from me.
Sarriesfan and I obviously eat in different types of restaurant. I hadn't realised that different parts of Britain had different preferences in Asian food.

I know well (and wouldn't think to explain) naan, chapati and tortillas (and popadoms) - but I wouldn't know injera, roti, matzah or lavash.
We do have a few Caucasian and western Asian immigrants, but a lot more from southern Asia.
Mnemon
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2020 9:02:20 AM

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Location: Enschede, Overijssel, Netherlands
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
The question has been well answered, but a comment from me.
Sarriesfan and I obviously eat in different types of restaurant. I hadn't realised that different parts of Britain had different preferences in Asian food.

I know well (and wouldn't think to explain) naan, chapati and tortillas (and popadoms) - but I wouldn't know injera, roti, matzah or lavash.
We do have a few Caucasian and western Asian immigrants, but a lot more from southern Asia.



Hello my Scottish friend,

Thanks for chiming in.
Marek Guman
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2020 2:12:19 PM

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Hello,

I am not a native speaker and I live in Slovakia, but FWIW, I know lavash bread. There is a restaurant in our city, the owner of which is a proud Armenian (wifi password is armenia1), and they serve it, although not very often. I don't think I would know the word without the restaurant. The only other word for flatbread we hear around here is pita I think.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2020 2:45:04 PM

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I am not particularly keen on Indian (South Asian) food, but I know naan, chapati. What I didn't know was roti. I don't think I've ever heard the term. It only brings to mind French rôti!

Injera I know more from learning about places around the world than from any food experience, and I agree Jewish terms are not mainstream in Britain the way they are in the US. Although I did live in a very Jewish area they are Hasidic and so separated the culture never mixes. Full of Turkish eateries, though. I asked my local Turkish takeaway why they stopped putting the food inside the pita bread and was told 'people expect it that way in London'. What? And lose the whole point of soaking up the juices so you get a wet bag and dry bread. Philistines. Whistle


Quote:
The Armenian community of the United Kingdom consists mainly of British citizens who are fully or partially of Armenian descent. There has been sporadic emigration from Armenia to the UK since the 18th century, with the biggest influx coming after the Second World War. The majority are based in the major cities of London and Manchester. The 2001 UK Census recorded 589 Armenian-born people living in the UK,[1] and in 2013, the Office for National Statistics estimated that there were 1,235 people born in Armenia resident in the UK, with the number of Armenian nationals being 1,720,[2] although it has been estimated by the Armenian Diaspora Conference that there are up to 18,000 ethnic Armenians including those who are British-born, and of part Armenian descent, living in the UK.[3]


I thought maybe Toronto or New York would have Armenian influences. Turns out it was Sydney or other places south. With no history of empire, it just turns on coincidences of need and opportunity, and governments' policies at various times, who tends to go where.

For completeness, the Icelandic diaspora gifted the world (OK, Manitoba and Minnesota) with flatkaka. Made with lichen when you couldn't get rye because it is hard to grow grain in Iceland. I wonder why that never caught on as a restaurant staple. Lichen flatbread? Whistle The role that bread takes in other cultures, the staple side dish eaten at every meal, was filled by dried fish. Again, I wonder why that hasn't caught on. Would you like some dried fish with your meal?




Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2020 5:08:31 PM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Luton does have a lot, and I mean a lot of restaurants selling cuisine from the area of the Indian sub continent, with different cuisines.

One of my favourites is fully halal, at first when I first went there they said at the door, “You know we don’t sell alcohol?” they were so used to white folk wanting a beer with their food, now they recognise us an don’t bother.
But every one around here sells naans, roti, paratha, chapati and popadoms.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2020 8:50:29 PM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Mnemon wrote:
Hello my Scottish friend,
Thanks for chiming in.

Thanks.
(Don't tell anyone, but I'm actually from Northern England, living in Scotland.) Silenced Shhh
Mnemon
Posted: Thursday, October 22, 2020 1:38:32 PM

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Joined: 10/27/2019
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Location: Enschede, Overijssel, Netherlands
Drag0nspeaker wrote:

(Don't tell anyone, but I'm actually from Northern England, living in Scotland.) Silenced Shhh

No worries, I'm going to keep it under my hat. Not talking
[between you, me and the gatepost]Silenced
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