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Here rides! Options
Ivan Fadeev
Posted: Monday, October 19, 2020 3:41:32 AM

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DOes it sound OK to you?

Here rides a bicycle a boy!
or
Here rides a boy a bicycle!
Romany
Posted: Monday, October 19, 2020 5:56:59 AM
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There are very few verbs which are introduced by "here."

They are 'comes', 'is' & 'lies' ( for grave headstones).

So here "rides" is not acceptable.

However, even with this change the sentence is still not correct because then we have:

"Here comes a bicycle a boy" or "Here comes a boy a bicycle." (I don't think I need to explain why, as your level of English will confirm that these aren't valid)

"Here comes a boy riding a bicycle." is the correct way to express this thought.
Ivan Fadeev
Posted: Monday, October 19, 2020 6:23:10 AM

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Oh! I see.

I suppose that

"Here comes a boy riding a bicycle" can mean two things.

1) I can see a boy who is riding a bicycle right now.
2) Here comes a boy who rides a bicycle (off and on).

Right?
Romany
Posted: Monday, October 19, 2020 6:50:56 AM
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I don't agree that sentence 2) could have anything to do with how often "he" rides the bike.

The use of "a boy" implies it's just some random kid on a bike. Someone we don't know. How then could we know how often this kid rides a bike?

If there is text which comes before this sentence and provides context we'd be able to use "the boy" - because we've already mentioned him before.

Otherwise: "Here comes a boy riding a bicycle" implies nothing further than that a boy on a bike is approaching.
Audiendus
Posted: Monday, October 19, 2020 8:08:37 AM
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Ivan Fadeev wrote:
I suppose that

"Here comes a boy riding a bicycle" can mean two things.

1) I can see a boy who is riding a bicycle right now.
2) Here comes a boy who rides a bicycle (off and on).

As Romany says, it cannot mean (2) – or at least it is extremely unlikely to do so. The expression "Here comes..." is understood to mean 'right now'.

You are probably thinking of the use of the simple present to indicate a habitual action. We could indicate this by getting rid of the set phrase "Here comes...". For example, we could say: "A boy comes here riding a bicycle" or "A boy who rides a bicycle comes here".
KMQ
Posted: Monday, October 19, 2020 8:56:35 AM

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Location: Clearwater, Florida, United States
Romany wrote:

There are very few verbs which are introduced by "here."

They are 'comes', 'is' & 'lies' ( for grave headstones).

So here "rides" is not acceptable.

However, even with this change the sentence is still not correct because then we have:

"Here comes a bicycle a boy" or "Here comes a boy a bicycle." (I don't think I need to explain why, as your level of English will confirm that these aren't valid)

"Here comes a boy riding a bicycle." is the correct way to express this thought.


Well said, it is grammar 101 knowing it makes no sense to say "here a boy a bicycle". It's just words strung together with no meaning.
Kirill Vorobyov
Posted: Monday, October 19, 2020 9:28:35 AM

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Romany wrote:

There are very few verbs which are introduced by "here."

They are 'comes', 'is' & 'lies' ( for grave headstones).



Apparently it hasn't always been this way. Here is what I found:
My Dear Fellow-traveller, Here Hast Thou a Letter: Which I Have Wrote to Thee Out of the Fulness of My Heart and with Many Tears for Thy Salvation's Sake ...
(Benjamin Franklin, 1742)

FounDit
Posted: Monday, October 19, 2020 11:01:54 AM

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Kirill Vorobyov wrote:
Romany wrote:

There are very few verbs which are introduced by "here."

They are 'comes', 'is' & 'lies' ( for grave headstones).



Apparently it hasn't always been this way. Here is what I found:
My Dear Fellow-traveller, Here Hast Thou a Letter: Which I Have Wrote to Thee Out of the Fulness of My Heart and with Many Tears for Thy Salvation's Sake ...
(Benjamin Franklin, 1742)



True. English has evolved since Franklin's time. Today we'd say, "Here you have a letter...".

So to "here comes", "here is", and "here lies", you can add "here you"".
Audiendus
Posted: Monday, October 19, 2020 11:16:38 AM
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Location: London, England, United Kingdom
FounDit wrote:
So to "here comes", "here is", and "here lies", you can add "here you"".

And "here goes".
Ivan Fadeev
Posted: Monday, October 19, 2020 11:49:06 AM

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Joined: 2/21/2015
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I have found this example in an American book.

Here rides a boy on a three-wheeled bicycle , thick tires bounce, the boy rings in a brilliant bell, sweeps past Petit, as if Petit is not.

Scam : The First Four Issues Erick Lyle
Romany
Posted: Monday, October 19, 2020 6:54:10 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Oh, now I get it.

Some writers like to write in the immediate present because they think it makes the story more relatable but, having gone and read bits & pieces our of SCAM, I would say it was just used as part of the style this publication chose to use.

It was a subversive, edgy publication written not by journalists and writers but by the people living the lifestyle it's all about. They were, at that time, rebels.

The rules and conventions of grammar are unlikely to have been seen as anything but a false system introduced thousands of years after we'd all learnt to how to use language without these shackles to our communication. (Or something like that.)

In other words: it was a quirky publication, contributors were free to use quirky language.

Edited to add: "here you" doesn't fit the pattern of "Here + verb."; but Aud's "Here goes" is definitely one I overlooked!

tautophile
Posted: Monday, October 19, 2020 8:00:13 PM
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"Here comes a boy on a bicycle."
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