mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
piss off Options
Tara2
Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2020 8:14:11 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,568
Neurons: 9,802
If 'pissed off' means angry, why is it vulgar?
thar
Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2020 8:19:08 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 22,813
Neurons: 92,675
Because piss is urine.
No logic behind it meaning being angry, it is just slang.

In BrE to be pissed is to be drunk. So sometimes Americans saying they are pissed is confusing, although normally you can infer meaning from context.
Tara2
Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2020 8:25:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,568
Neurons: 9,802
thar wrote:
Because piss is urine.
No logic behind it meaning being angry, it is just slang.

In BrE to be pissed is to be drunk. So sometimes Americans saying they are pissed is confusing, although normally you can infer meaning from context.

Aha, thank you so much. Angel
Sorry thar, how does it mean 'go away', please?
thar
Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2020 8:36:58 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 22,813
Neurons: 92,675
Piss off! - an imperative - go away, leave me alone. Quite rude and certainly vulgar.

No logic, it is just a swear word. Like "fuck off!" but less offensive. The milder version.

https://youtu.be/v0rC-twlrfg
Tara2
Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2020 9:01:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,568
Neurons: 9,802
thar wrote:
Piss off! - an imperative - go away, leave me alone. Quite rude and certainly vulgar.

No logic, it is just a swear word. Like "fuck off!" but less offensive. The milder version.

https://youtu.be/v0rC-twlrfg

Thank you so much dear thar!!!
Tara2
Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2020 10:47:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,568
Neurons: 9,802
Sorry thar Angel
I read the comment below :

Quote:
AE is a little more direct than T. Tompion's thorough definition. Pissed off is vulgar slang for angry. It can, is softer circumstances, be vulgar slang for very irritated and annoyed. It has no sense of being tired and disappointed or discouraged in AE. It is sometimes abbreviated to pissed. This should not be confused with the BE meaning of pissed.


In the last part (It is sometimes abbreviated to pissed. This should not be confused with the BE meaning of pissed), which meaning of 'pissed' is meant?
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2020 11:10:29 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 14,481
Neurons: 68,876
Tara2 wrote:
Sorry thar Angel
I read the comment below :

Quote:
AE is a little more direct than T. Tompion's thorough definition. Pissed off is vulgar slang for angry. It can, is softer circumstances, be vulgar slang for very irritated and annoyed. It has no sense of being tired and disappointed or discouraged in AE. It is sometimes abbreviated to pissed. This should not be confused with the BE meaning of pissed.


In the last part (It is sometimes abbreviated to pissed. This should not be confused with the BE meaning of pissed), which meaning of 'pissed' is meant?


Hi, Tara. Just to add a bit to your understanding, in AmE, "I am pissed", and "I'm pissed off" means to be angry.

In BrE and in AmE, "piss off!" means to go away. It is a command, but being "pissed", meaning being drunk in BrE, is one we don't use in AmE.

Also, for the first part of the 1900's, up until around 1960, here in the U.S. there was a very strict language code that most people were taught. No one used language considered vulgar in public or in mixed company (men and women together). "Piss" was one of those words people didn't use, but preferred some euphemism instead.

Since the 1960's the culture has undergone a dramatic change and the most vulgar words are now commonplace, especially among young people. There appear to be almost no standards now governing behavior, coarsening our culture and reducing the respect and consideration that was once almost universal here.
Tara2
Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2020 11:29:05 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,568
Neurons: 9,802
FounDit wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Sorry thar Angel
I read the comment below :

Quote:
AE is a little more direct than T. Tompion's thorough definition. Pissed off is vulgar slang for angry. It can, is softer circumstances, be vulgar slang for very irritated and annoyed. It has no sense of being tired and disappointed or discouraged in AE. It is sometimes abbreviated to pissed. This should not be confused with the BE meaning of pissed.


In the last part (It is sometimes abbreviated to pissed. This should not be confused with the BE meaning of pissed), which meaning of 'pissed' is meant?


Hi, Tara. Just to add a bit to your understanding, in AmE, "I am pissed", and "I'm pissed off" means to be angry.

In BrE and in AmE, "piss off!" means to go away. It is a command, but being "pissed", meaning being drunk in BrE, is one we don't use in AmE.

Also, for the first part of the 1900's, up until around 1960, here in the U.S. there was a very strict language code that most people were taught. No one used language considered vulgar in public or in mixed company (men and women together). "Piss" was one of those words people didn't use, but preferred some euphemism instead.

Since the 1960's the culture has undergone a dramatic change and the most vulgar words are now commonplace, especially among young people. There appear to be almost no standards now governing behavior, coarsening our culture and reducing the respect and consideration that was once almost universal here.

Hi dear FounDit. thank you so much for the great explanation. Angel
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2020 12:25:51 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 2,066
Neurons: 13,290
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
In BrE there are several different meanings.
Piss off means to go away.
To be pissed off means to be angry.
To be pissed means to be drunk.

As FD and thar have said we don’t use “I am pissed” to mean angry here.
Tara2
Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2020 2:06:19 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,568
Neurons: 9,802
Sarrriesfan wrote:
In BrE there are several different meanings.
Piss off means to go away.
To be pissed off means to be angry.
To be pissed means to be drunk.

As FD and thar have said we don’t use “I am pissed” to mean angry here.

Excellent. Many thanks dear Sarries.Angel
georgew
Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2020 2:44:08 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/13/2016
Posts: 299
Neurons: 1,924
Location: Calabasas, California, United States
As FD and thar have said we don’t use “I am pissed” to mean angry here.

Not so in AE. The expression commonly has that meaning in AE with or without "off".

thar
Posted: Sunday, September 20, 2020 4:36:22 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 22,813
Neurons: 92,675
Also interesting that the imperative "piss off" means go away, I don't want you here, but the active (intransitive) verb "he pissed off" means he left when he shouldn't have. He should be here.

Eg
There should be two of us doing this job, but Maria pissed off just after lunch and left me to do all the work myself. She thinks she can sneak out early because the boss is too busy to notice.
Tara2
Posted: Sunday, September 20, 2020 5:29:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,568
Neurons: 9,802
georgew wrote:
As FD and thar have said we don’t use “I am pissed” to mean angry here.

Not so in AE. The expression commonly has that meaning in AE with or without "off".


Thank you very much. Angel
Tara2
Posted: Sunday, September 20, 2020 5:30:29 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,568
Neurons: 9,802
thar wrote:
Also interesting that the imperative "piss off" means go away, I don't want you here, but the active (intransitive) verb "he pissed off" means he left when he shouldn't have. He should be here.

Eg
There should be two of us doing this job, but Maria pissed off just after lunch and left me to do all the work myself. She thinks she can sneak out early because the boss is too busy to notice.

Fabluos. Many thanks. Angel
Tara2
Posted: Sunday, September 20, 2020 6:34:40 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,568
Neurons: 9,802
thar wrote:
Also interesting that the imperative "piss off" means go away, I don't want you here, but the active (intransitive) verb "he pissed off" means he left when he shouldn't have. He should be here.

Eg
There should be two of us doing this job, but Maria pissed off just after lunch and left me to do all the work myself. She thinks she can sneak out early because the boss is too busy to notice.

Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.