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stressed distress Options
Tara2
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 4:54:49 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,497
Neurons: 9,521
What is the difference between 'stressed' and 'distressed'?

I'm stressed/I'm distressed
thar
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 5:08:29 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 22,677
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Stress (in modern usage) is when the things that are happening are too much for you to cope with.
You have screaming kids, a boss who hates you, deadlines to meet, exams to revise for - it is all too much.
Stress is a long-term condition where your ability to cope is just worn down, whether the thing that stresses you is your neighbour being noisy or living in a war zone.


Distress is when you are upset because of something that has happened. You are hurt or lost or have had some bad news, although it implies that you are in difficulty now, and need help.
It is normally quite a short-term problem because either it gets so bad you get some help, or you just start to feel more comfortable about the situation.

The cliche is 'a damsel in distress' who is rescued from danger by a prince on a white horse. Whistle
Tara2
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 5:14:14 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,497
Neurons: 9,521
thar wrote:
Stress (in modern usage) is when the things that are happening are too much for you to cope with.
You have screaming kids, a boss who hates you, deadlines to meet, exams to revise for - it is all too much.
Stress is a long-term condition where your ability to cope is just worn down, whether the thing that stresses you is your neighbour being noisy or living in a war zone.


Distress is when you are upset because of something that has happened. You are hurt or lost or have had some bad news, although it implies that you are in difficulty now, and need help.
It is normally quite a short-term problem because either it gets so bad you get some help, or you just start to feel more comfortable about the situation.

The cliche is 'a damsel in distress' who is rescued from danger by a prince on a white horse. Whistle

Wonderful. Many thanks dear thar. Angel
Sorry thar, only this question, which of these two is more close to 'nerve-wracking', please?
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 6:08:49 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 17,562
Neurons: 56,763
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

My response would be that something that was nerve-wracking could be a component (part) of either stress or distress.

"wrack" is something that has been completely destroyed so something that is nerve-wracking destroys our nerves. Drives us nuts.(mad).

Stress can play havoc with one's nerves and completely destroy them. Acute distress can have the same effect.

The meaning of "Nerve-wracking" is thus not "close to" either 'stress' or 'distress'. But it can be a symptom of either state.
Tara2
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 6:59:18 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,497
Neurons: 9,521
Romany wrote:

My response would be that something that was nerve-wracking could be a component (part) of either stress or distress.

"wrack" is something that has been completely destroyed so something that is nerve-wracking destroys our nerves. Drives us nuts.(mad).

Stress can play havoc with one's nerves and completely destroy them. Acute distress can have the same effect.

The meaning of "Nerve-wracking" is thus not "close to" either 'stress' or 'distress'. But it can be a symptom of either state.


Many thanks dear thar for the great explanation!!!
Sometimes we behave angrily with other because of our nervous. (Not that it is a disease we are just temporarily, very short). In Farsi we say 'I'm nervouse', don't you say like this, please? (some women are like this in their monthly period)
pjharvey
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 10:39:25 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/13/2012
Posts: 1,099
Neurons: 71,920
Tara2 wrote:
Romany wrote:

My response would be that something that was nerve-wracking could be a component (part) of either stress or distress.

"wrack" is something that has been completely destroyed so something that is nerve-wracking destroys our nerves. Drives us nuts.(mad).

Stress can play havoc with one's nerves and completely destroy them. Acute distress can have the same effect.

The meaning of "Nerve-wracking" is thus not "close to" either 'stress' or 'distress'. But it can be a symptom of either state.


Many thanks dear thar for the great explanation!!!
Sometimes we behave angrily with other because of our nervous. (Not that it is a disease we are just temporarily, very short). In Farsi we say 'I'm nervouse', don't you say like this, please? (some women are like this in their monthly period)


Tara, you had better turn both your thanks and your question to Romany in this instance :)
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 10:50:05 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 17,562
Neurons: 56,763
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom


No. "nervous" doesn't have that meaning in English.

We use it to mean scared; unsure of ourselves;frightened that we are going to make a fool of ourselves.

If you are going to meet your partner's parents for the first time you are nervous.

The day you start a new job you are nervous.

Your period can make you cranky, cross, miserable, sore, tired - but not 'nervous'.

The term 'PMS' (pre-menstrual syndrome) is used to describe those couple of days when your period is due and you want to bite everyone's head right off! (In some places it's called 'PMT' - pre-menstrual tension. Women everywhere understand both terms.)
Tara2
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 12:19:04 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,497
Neurons: 9,521
pjharvey wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Romany wrote:

My response would be that something that was nerve-wracking could be a component (part) of either stress or distress.

"wrack" is something that has been completely destroyed so something that is nerve-wracking destroys our nerves. Drives us nuts.(mad).

Stress can play havoc with one's nerves and completely destroy them. Acute distress can have the same effect.

The meaning of "Nerve-wracking" is thus not "close to" either 'stress' or 'distress'. But it can be a symptom of either state.


Many thanks dear thar for the great explanation!!!
Sometimes we behave angrily with other because of our nervous. (Not that it is a disease we are just temporarily, very short). In Farsi we say 'I'm nervouse', don't you say like this, please? (some women are like this in their monthly period)


Tara, you had better turn both your thanks and your question to Romany in this instance :)

I think thar knows these things too he knows everything Whistle WhistleAngel Angel
I just used that period example to make my question maybe more clearer
Tara2
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 12:20:19 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,497
Neurons: 9,521
Romany wrote:


No. "nervous" doesn't have that meaning in English.

We use it to mean scared; unsure of ourselves;frightened that we are going to make a fool of ourselves.

If you are going to meet your partner's parents for the first time you are nervous.

The day you start a new job you are nervous.

Your period can make you cranky, cross, miserable, sore, tired - but not 'nervous'.

The term 'PMS' (pre-menstrual syndrome) is used to describe those couple of days when your period is due and you want to bite everyone's head right off! (In some places it's called 'PMT' - pre-menstrual tension. Women everywhere understand both terms.)

Very impressive. Many, many thanks dear Rom that you answered both my questions. Angel
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