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scaffy witch gave me a gammy spell (BE) Options
Mnemon
Posted: Friday, July 10, 2020 12:59:00 AM

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Joined: 10/27/2019
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Quote:
That scaffy witch gave me a gammy spell.

Brave animated movie


I'm interested to know more about the words "scaffy" and "gammy". I've looked them up in a couple of online dictionaries, but it was of no avail. What do you understand from the red parts?
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, July 10, 2020 1:40:22 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 2,010
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Mnemon wrote:
Quote:
That scaffy witch gave me a gammy spell.

Brave animated movie


I'm interested to know more about the words "scaffy" and "gammy". I've looked them up in a couple of online dictionaries, but it was of no avail. What do you understand from the red parts?


“Scaffy” in Scottish slang means disreputable, cheap or tacky originally it meant a street sweeper or bin man.
Gammy is British slang meaning injured, damaged or broken, it’s often said of the leg in British English “ I would have won that race, if it wasn’t for me gammy leg”.

“That rubbish witch gave me a broken spell”. would be my translation.
Mnemon
Posted: Friday, July 10, 2020 1:58:28 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 10/27/2019
Posts: 48
Neurons: 279
Sarrriesfan wrote:
Mnemon wrote:
Quote:
That scaffy witch gave me a gammy spell.

Brave animated movie


I'm interested to know more about the words "scaffy" and "gammy". I've looked them up in a couple of online dictionaries, but it was of no avail. What do you understand from the red parts?


“Scaffy” in Scottish slang means disreputable, cheap or tacky originally it meant a street sweeper or bin man.
Gammy is British slang meaning injured, damaged or broken, it’s often said of the leg in British English “ I would have won that race, if it wasn’t for me gammy leg”.

“That rubbish witch gave me a broken spell”. would be my translation.


Many thanks for the explanation.
FounDit
Posted: Friday, July 10, 2020 11:17:00 AM

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Joined: 9/19/2011
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Just to add a bit to your knowledge, in AmE, we often use the word "game" (as in "soccer game") for "gammy".

game2 (geɪm)

adj.
lame: a game leg.
[1780–90; perhaps shortening of gammy, though change in vowel unclear]
Romany
Posted: Saturday, July 11, 2020 7:32:43 AM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

A little more "knowledge": the word "game" being used to mean "lame" is not confined only to AE but is universal,

It is a far later usage than "gammy" (19thC) and comes from a completely different source.

"Gammy" which traces back to Old English, has been a dialect word for centuries. It does not necessarily mean "lame", but can mean injured in any way, and can refer to permanent gamminess or temporary gamminess.

The quoted source which supplies a possible "shortening of the the word "gammy" to provide "game" merely puts out a supposition or guess which is not backed up by linguistic research.

This is one of the reasons the rule about providing sources governs the instructions, advice or information given when one has no learned knowledge of a subject or question: it enables recipients of such information to decide for themselves whether the source is reliable or not.

This then removes any question of "personal error" from the person who cited the quote, and places such misinformation squarely as the responsibility of the quoted source.
Mnemon
Posted: Saturday, July 11, 2020 7:13:48 PM

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Thanks.

Romany wrote:

A little more "knowledge": the word "game" being used to mean "lame" is not confined only to AE but is universal [...]


You can say that again,

Quote:

gammy in British English
(ˈɡæmɪ )
adjectiveWord forms: -mier or -miest
British slang
(esp of the leg) malfunctioning, injured, or lame; game
US equivalent: gimpy


According to Collins, the American equivalent of the word "gammy" is "gimpy".

Romany
Posted: Sunday, July 12, 2020 6:57:13 AM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 17,562
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

I'd be surprised to learn that "gimpy" is still used in America - even the dictionary entries for the word stress that it's:-

"gimp. The noun gimp is sometimes used to describe a limp or another physical disability, although it's an outdated and offensive word to use. (https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/gimp)"

"US and Canadian offensive, slang a physically disabled person, esp one who is lame. slang a sexual fetishist who likes to be dominated and who dresses in a leather or rubber body suit with mask, zips, and chains." (https://www.dictionary.com/browse/gimp)

Thus the adjective "gimpy" has become not only sexualised, but references fetishism as well in AE.

(There's a town in Australia called "Gympie" - pronounced the same way as "Gimpy". When people from there get asked where they come from there's always a big laugh and lots of teasing!! "I'm a Gympie girl!" takes on a whole different meaning!!"
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