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Mohammad Reza.s
Posted: Monday, June 1, 2020 7:44:51 PM

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Joined: 3/13/2019
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Location: Tabrīz, East Azarbaijan, Iran
Hi my dear friends,
What does the word 'hingeaflex' mean in the following sentence?
Does it mean 'flex point'?

I remember christening "the hingeaflex."
tautophile
Posted: Monday, June 1, 2020 9:43:04 PM
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Joined: 3/14/2018
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I have no idea what "hingeaflex" refers to. I note, though, that it appears in a 2014 book titled The ACT Matrix: A New Approach to Building Psychological Flexibility Across Settings and Populations. You would have to read the book to find out what "hingeaflex" means in the context it's apparently referring to.
Aaron Andrew
Posted: Monday, June 1, 2020 11:44:09 PM
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Location: Omaha, Nebraska, United States
wow, hingeaflex! You've got me buddy.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, June 2, 2020 7:02:24 AM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Mohammad Reza.s wrote:
'I remember christening "the hingeaflex".'

It is something which the author "christened" - he invented a name for it.

It is not a normal English word - it's an invention.

This is what the author says it is:
"When I was at Togus, we improvised a role-play in which the client was visually presented with two choices. This was the first time I had clearly observed a client faced with a discrimination task . . . I remember christening this 'The Hingeaflex'."

So a hingeaflex is a role-play in which the client is visually presented with two choices.
Roxanne Royal
Posted: Tuesday, June 2, 2020 8:17:05 AM

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Location: Dubai, Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Hingeaflex does not exist in the English language. It's a word created for a certain material/reference. You should look-up the material and understanding the meaning in context. It's seems to be a code for something since you're reading about the Matrix and the grid. Christening something here would mean to make something holy. To accept it and/or submit to it as something divine like NOW but was not considered like hat before. The reason for christening is that people wanted to use it or have it be used on someone, whatever it is, and made it look holy so that they would embody it to show other people that they took it "seriously" in order to have other people copy them without much thought.

Hinge alone means dependent, like a connection. Flex is a cable. So connected cable? As in an existing ideology or methodology ? Christening it would be setting it in stone, making it 'absolute'.
Mohammad Reza.s
Posted: Tuesday, June 2, 2020 9:20:03 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 3/13/2019
Posts: 94
Neurons: 2,560
Location: Tabrīz, East Azarbaijan, Iran
Thanks to all of you, you are so helpful.🙏🙏🌺
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, June 4, 2020 8:17:34 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Roxanne Royal wrote:
Christening something here would mean to make something holy. To accept it and/or submit to it as something divine like NOW but was not considered like hat before


In the church, "christen" is to name in god's name - to accept a child into the religion and give the child a name.

In any other circumstances, it just means "to give something a name".

christen - v
2.a. To name: christened the kitten "Snowball."
American Heritage Dictionary
3. to give a name to (anything) Collins English Dictionary
3. to name and dedicate: to christen a ship.
4. to make use of for the first time.
- Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary

"We christened the first week of the survey ' the blitz ', during which we stormed through the sites obtaining preliminary information."
"I have christened this scheme "life-link"or"life-line" if, for no other reason than that one must have a name for it."
(Examples from the Cambridge Dictionary)

Nothing in these meanings refers to religion or making something holy.
tautophile
Posted: Thursday, June 4, 2020 6:58:39 PM
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Joined: 3/14/2018
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Very true, Drag0nspeaker. Consider the word "silly". Originally it meant "spiritual, having to do with the soul" (Cf. German selig, meaning holy.) "Silly" now means "foolish". In the same way "christen", originally "annoint, make holy", with particular reference to the Christian religion, now means merely "give a name to", with almost no religious reference at all.
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