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kira100
Posted: Saturday, May 30, 2020 1:35:34 AM

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Location: Saint Petersburg, St.-Petersburg, Russia
Hi! One of my favorite stories by Jerome K Jerome is "The Hobby Rider", but I don't understand its title. What does "rider" mean in this case? (A story about a man who took different hobbies with passion and what came out of it).
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, May 30, 2020 2:01:58 AM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
kira100 wrote:
Hi! One of my favorite stories by Jerome K Jerome is "The Hobby Rider", but I don't understand its title. What does "rider" mean in this case? (A story about a man who took different hobbies with passion and what came out of it).


It’s a play on words.
You understand hobby as activities are interests that a person does for fun.
But there is another meaning of the word hobby, that is archaic now.
https://www.thefreedictionary.com/Hobby
Quote:
3. Archaic. a small horse.


The man has many pass times or hobbies, hobbies are horses and so he is a rider.
kira100
Posted: Saturday, May 30, 2020 3:12:26 AM

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Location: Saint Petersburg, St.-Petersburg, Russia
Thank you so much!
tautophile
Posted: Saturday, May 30, 2020 5:23:17 PM
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A toy horse, such as a child might ride, is often called a hobby horse or hobbyhorse. Typically it's a stick with a model of a horse's head at one end. The child sits astride it, as in this old picture:


A hobby horse is sometimes called a cock-horse, as in the well-known Mother Goose rhyme that goes:

Ride a cock-horse
To Banbury Cross
To see a fine lady
Upon a white horse
With rings on her fingers
And bells on her toes,
And she shall have music
Wherever she goes.

"Horse" in the rhyme is pronounced "hoss" to rhyme with "cross". The original cross in the town center of Banbury, a town in north Oxfordshire, England, is long gone, but was replaced in 1858. George Orwell parodied this verse in "Brave New World" with the couplet:

Streptocock-gee to Banbury T,
To see a fine bathroom and W.C.

tautophile
Posted: Saturday, May 30, 2020 5:35:50 PM
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Joined: 3/14/2018
Posts: 1,100
Neurons: 22,282
A toy horse, such as a child might "ride" by sitting astride it, is often called a hobby horse or hobbyhorse. Typically it's a stick with a model of a horse's head at one end. Children have played with such toy horses since medieval times: in one of Breughel's famous paintings, a child is shown astride one in a village street.

A hobby horse is sometimes called a cock-horse, as in the well-known Mother Goose rhyme that goes:

Ride a cock-horse
To Banbury Cross
To see a fine lady
Upon a white horse
With rings on her fingers
And bells on her toes,
And she shall have music
Wherever she goes.

"Horse" here is pronounced "hoss" to rhyme with "cross". The original cross referred to in the rhyme was in the town center of Banbury, a market town in north Oxfordshire, England, but Puritans destroyed it in about 1600. The present town cross in Banbury was built in 1858. Aldous Huxley parodied this verse in his novel "Brave New World" with the couplet:

Streptocock-G to Banbury T,
To see a fine bathroom and W.C.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, May 30, 2020 6:04:29 PM

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Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 2,153
Neurons: 13,806
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Hobby horse is also the name of a character in folklore particularly English Morris dancing.
This is a painting from 17th century England of a Morris at Richmond on Thames.


This is a modern hobby horse.


But the original hobby horses were a type of small horse now extinct.
https://www.archaeology.org/news/7185-181205-ireland-hobby-horses

They were ridden by a type of light cavalry known as Hobilers or Hobilars.
https://www.thefreedictionary.com/Hobiler
Romany
Posted: Saturday, May 30, 2020 7:24:42 PM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom


Regarding the Irish horses: - Yes, it's a rare example of something real becoming, in time, to be thought of as mythical, isn't it?

Usually it's the other way round - something/someone entirely mythical is believed, over time, to have been real.
kira100
Posted: Tuesday, June 2, 2020 9:49:21 AM

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Joined: 4/28/2020
Posts: 26
Neurons: 671
Location: Saint Petersburg, St.-Petersburg, Russia
That is so interesting! So my question was not an empty question. I've got a whole lecture! Thanks a lot))
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, June 2, 2020 2:26:43 PM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 17,936
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom


Yeah - but theDancing Lecturing Fee is in the mail!Dancing
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, June 2, 2020 3:47:09 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 2,153
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Romany wrote:


Yeah - but theDancing Lecturing Fee is in the mail!Dancing


You charge!?
Now I feel stupid doing it for free.Whistle
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