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Jigneshbharati
Posted: Monday, May 25, 2020 3:55:34 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/3/2016
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This morning, we shall see if weightlessness changes the way spiders weave their webs.
I read the above in Ricky Rocket by Shoo Rayner.
Please explain the use of "shall see vs will see" in the above?
FounDit
Posted: Monday, May 25, 2020 11:57:10 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
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Jigneshbharati wrote:
This morning, we shall see if weightlessness changes the way spiders weave their webs.
I read the above in Ricky Rocket by Shoo Rayner.
Please explain the use of "shall see vs will see" in the above?

It seems to be the difference between BrE and AmE. BrE traditionally tended to use "shall" while AmE tends to use "will".

Americans tend to use "shall" only with the meaning of obligation, or requirement, such as "Visitors shall display identification upon entering", or in a somewhat humorous way as in "Shall we go?"

But the meaning is the same in the sentence you provided.
thar
Posted: Monday, May 25, 2020 12:15:36 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
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The traditional grammar uses shall for the first person (I, we) and will for the second and third person (you, he she it, they)

We shall see....

You will see....

Quote:
The traditional rule is that shall is used with first person pronouns (i.e. I and we) to form the future tense, while will is used with second and third person forms (i.e. you, he, she, it, they). For example: I shall be late.


Quote:

Shall
Grammar > Verbs > Modal verbs and modality > Shall
from English Grammar Today
Shall: forms
Affirmative form
Shall comes first in the verb phrase (after the subject and before another verb). We use it mostly with I and we:

I shall post it to you tomorrow.


Shall cannot be used with another modal verb:

I shall have to be at the airport by 5 pm.

Not: I shall must be … or I must shall be …

Shall can be followed by have to, need to and be able to:We shall have to tell him what happened.

The good news is I shall be able to join you at your meeting next week.

Negative form
The negative form of shall is shan’t. We don’t use don’t, doesn’t, didn’t with shall:

I shan’t be home tomorrow night.

We shan’t know the result of the tests till Tuesday.

We can use the full form shall not in formal contexts or when we want to emphasis something:

[a public notice in a restaurant]

The management shall not be responsible for damage to personal property.

We don’t often use the negative form


https://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/shall

That pattern is not so commonly known any more, but a few people still follow it.

edit - this guy was an army child and got a public school education (for those in the US, in Britain that means a fee-paying school) - in this case he went to King's College Canterbury which has been a school continuously since 597 AD. Yes, I didn't miss out the 1. I am guessing they taught traditional grammar rules when he was there.
Or he may have picked it up from his parents or even from the very correct style of English in Pakistan were he lived for a time as a child (the source of the name Shoo from his nanny who couldn't say "Hugh"). Or all of those combined.
)


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