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International tracking of the COVID-19 invasion: an amazing example of a globalized scientific coordination effort Options
Hope123
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2020 10:01:07 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2015
Posts: 9,170
Neurons: 52,433
Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10530-020-02287-5

It is extraordinary to witness the spread of COVID-19 almost in real-time. This tight monitoring of the invasion of a new virus is a situation that most other invasion scientists could only dream of. Especially spatiotemporal spread data of the early phases of an invasion would be extremely useful in order to understand and predict the human-mediated spread of species around the globe...

One can follow daily news about the number of new cases and deaths resulting from this respiratory disease since its very beginning in China to several hundreds of thousands of cases in over one hundred countries worldwide. Although most citizens take this information for granted, it is actually the result of a remarkable international open data-sharing policy. International health regulations require countries to inform the World Health Organization (WHO) of any event that may have implications for international public health (World Health Organization 2005). As a result, WHO is able to publish a database of cases and their geographic locations with daily updates. The data on the spread of COVID-19 are openly accessible to researchers who can build maps and mathematically model the spread of the disease to make predictions about potential future spread under different scenarios (Dong et al. 2020).

Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Friday, May 22, 2020 10:53:55 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/3/2016
Posts: 1,612
Neurons: 86,015
Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
Yes Hope123, mankind has taken giant leaps in many fields. With the advent of the internet, new methods and the speed with which the news travels have improvised exponentially. And so is research and measures devised to contain the spread of the dangerous virus. It has been labeled pandemic. But I disagree. Pandemics were the Spanish flu, the Great Plague of London. The 1918 influenza pandemic was the most severe pandemic in recent history. It was caused by an H1N1 virus with genes of avian origin. Although there is no universal consensus regarding where the virus originated, it spread worldwide from 1918-1919. In the United States, it was first identified in military personnel in spring 1918. It is estimated that about 500 million people or one-third of the world’s population became infected with this virus. The number of deaths was estimated to be at least 50 million worldwide with about 675,000 occurring in the United States. Mortality was high in people younger than 5 years old, 20-40 years old, and 65 years and older. The high mortality in healthy people, including those in the 20-40 year age group, was a unique feature of this pandemic. While the 1918 H1N1 virus has been synthesized and evaluated, the properties that made it so devastating are not well understood. With no vaccine to protect against influenza infection and no antibiotics to treat secondary bacterial infections that can be associated with influenza infections, control efforts worldwide were limited to non-pharmaceutical interventions such as isolation, quarantine, good personal hygiene, use of disinfectants, and limitations of public gatherings, which were applied unevenly.
The Spanish flu pandemic started in 1918. By the summer of 1919, the flu pandemic came to an end, as those that were infected either died or developed an immunity.
Almost 90 years later, in 2008, researchers announced they’d discovered what made the 1918 flu so deadly: A group of three genes enabled the virus to weaken a victim’s bronchial tubes and lungs and clear the way for bacterial pneumonia.
Since 1918, there have been several other influenza pandemics, although none as deadly. A flu pandemic from 1957 to 1958 killed around 2 million people worldwide, including some 70,000 people in the United States, and a pandemic from 1968 to 1969 killed approximately 1 million people, including some 34,000 Americans.
More than 12,000 Americans perished during the H1N1 (or “swine flu”) pandemic that occurred from 2009 to 2010. The novel coronavirus pandemic of 2020 is spreading around the world as countries race to find a cure for COVID-19 and citizens shelter in place in an attempt to avoid spreading the disease, which is particularly deadly because many carriers are asymptomatic for days before realizing they are infected.
Each of these modern-day pandemics brings renewed interest in and attention to the Spanish Flu, or “forgotten pandemic,” so-named because its spread was overshadowed by the deadliness of WWI and covered up by news blackouts and poor record-keeping.
In spite of the research, the WHO has not been able to invent any vaccine against the attacks of such unexpected, very dangerous
enemies.
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Sunday, May 24, 2020 12:14:40 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/3/2016
Posts: 1,612
Neurons: 86,015
Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
"The 1918 influenza pandemic was the most severe pandemic in recent history. It was caused by an H1N1 virus with genes of avian origin. Although there is no universal consensus regarding where the virus originated, it spread worldwide from 1918-1919. In the United States, it was first identified in military personnel in spring 1918. It is estimated that about 500 million people or one-third of the world’s population became infected with this virus. The number of deaths was estimated to be at least 50 million worldwide with about 675,000 occurring in the United States. Mortality was high in people younger than 5 years old, 20-40 years old, and 65 years and older. The high mortality in healthy people, including those in the 20-40 year age group, was a unique feature of this pandemic. While the 1918 H1N1 virus has been synthesized and evaluated, the properties that made it so devastating are not well understood. With no vaccine to protect against influenza infection and no antibiotics to treat secondary bacterial infections that can be associated with influenza infections, control efforts worldwide were limited to non-pharmaceutical interventions such as isolation, quarantine, good personal hygiene, use of disinfectants, and limitations of public gatherings, which were applied unevenly.
The Spanish flu pandemic started in 1918. By the summer of 1919, the flu pandemic came to an end, as those that were infected either died or developed an immunity.
Almost 90 years later, in 2008, researchers announced they’d discovered what made the 1918 flu so deadly: A group of three genes enabled the virus to weaken a victim’s bronchial tubes and lungs and clear the way for bacterial pneumonia.
Since 1918, there have been several other influenza pandemics, although none as deadly. A flu pandemic from 1957 to 1958 killed around 2 million people worldwide, including some 70,000 people in the United States, and a pandemic from 1968 to 1969 killed approximately 1 million people, including some 34,000 Americans.
More than 12,000 Americans perished during the H1N1 (or “swine flu”) pandemic that occurred from 2009 to 2010. The novel coronavirus pandemic of 2020 is spreading around the world as countries race to find a cure for COVID-19 and citizens shelter in place in an attempt to avoid spreading the disease, which is particularly deadly because many carriers are asymptomatic for days before realizing they are infected.
Each of these modern-day pandemics brings renewed interest in and attention to the Spanish Flu, or “forgotten pandemic,” so-named because its spread was overshadowed by the deadliness of WWI and covered up by news blackouts and poor record-keeping.
In spite of the research, the WHO has not been able to invent any vaccine against the attacks of such unexpected, very dangerous
enemies."

Source : CDC
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