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Ascension Day (Portugal) Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2020 12:00:00 AM
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Ascension Day (Portugal)

Also known as Quinta Feira da Espiga, or Ear of Wheat Thursday, Ascension Day in Portugal is associated with wishes for peace and prosperity. Traditionally, in rural communities, people gather olive branches, wheat sheaves, poppies, and daisies and fashion them into bouquets. The olive and wheat are symbolic of an abundant harvest, the poppy represents tranquility, and the daisy stands for money. Many Portuguese preserve a sprig of wheat in their homes as a symbol of prosperity. Another custom is to cull healing plants and herbs to be used later in homemade medicines. More...
Ashwin Vemuri
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Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2020 7:17:00 AM

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Portugal’s Ascension Day Traditions, Customs and Activities
At the time that Portugal became a republic, in 1910, the Republican Government placed emphasis on the religious holidays, including the one used to celebrate the Ascension of Christ. Today, the Ascension Day is a public holiday only in select regions. However, Christian communities around the country gather to celebrate the Ascension of Christ into heaven with Mass and organized prayer meetings within the Easter spirit of the season.

Also celebrated on this day is the Dia da Espiga (Day of the Corn) in Portugal. Traditionally, boys and girls go out into the fields in the early morning to pick corn and flowers to make flower arrangements, symbolizing wealth, peace, and happiness in their lives. This bouquet is kept inside the house until the next year. Today this tradition has been lost since many people live within the city limits away from corn fields.


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