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Sometimes I wonder why God ever trusts talent in the hands of women, they usually make such an infernal mess of it. I think... Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 12:00:00 AM
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Sometimes I wonder why God ever trusts talent in the hands of women, they usually make such an infernal mess of it. I think He must do it as a sort of ghastly joke.

Willa Cather (1873-1947)
KSPavan
Posted: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 1:50:45 AM

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Sometimes I wonder why God ever trusts talent in the hands of women, they usually make such an infernal mess of it. I think He must do it as a sort of ghastly joke.
Willa Cather (1873-1947)
KSPavan
Posted: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 1:51:07 AM

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Sometimes I wonder why God ever trusts talent in the hands of women, they usually make such an infernal mess of it. I think He must do it as a sort of ghastly joke.
Willa Cather (1873-1947)
Bully_rus
Posted: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 5:46:06 AM
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Daemon wrote:
Sometimes I wonder why God ever trusts talent in the hands of women, they usually make such an infernal mess of it. I think He must do it as a sort of ghastly joke.

Willa Cather (1873-1947)


Yeah. It seems that the notion of talent and its related implications is right out of the man’s world and as such it means nothing to women. Usually. Moreover it remains to be seen, whether it's magic or mess.
Céline Raymond
Posted: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 6:59:27 AM
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misogynistic
ibj_ldn
Posted: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 7:43:43 AM

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What a weird comment. I think that's an offense to all incredibly talented women who are alive or have ever lived.
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 7:45:33 AM

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If she were living today, she would never come up with such a thing.
Ashwin Vemuri
Posted: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 9:14:25 AM

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Thanks
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 11:12:03 AM

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Note Relating to Cather


In a piece in the Leader Cather writes: "Even the finer chapters of Wanda and A Village Commune, which Mr. Ruskin so much admires, are spoiled by lack of taste, true elegance, verbal precision and restraint, and marred by those debauches of the imagination in which she continually permits herself to indulge."

In an 1895 Courier article Cather writes:"Sometimes I wonder why God ever trusts talent in the hands of women, they usually make such an infernal mess of it. I think He must do it as a sort of ghastly joke. Really, it would be hard to find a better plot than is in that same Under Two Flags, and the book contains the rudiments of a great style, and it also contains some of the most driveling nonsense and mawkish sentimentality and contemptible feminine weakness to be found anywhere."Also mentioned: A Village Commune, Pascarel, Ariadne, Wanda, and Friendship; each has merits, but "I hate to read them."

Note Source
Leader 6/17/1899; Courier 11/23/1895


https://cather.unl.edu/scholarship/reading_bibliography/rbib0689
FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 12:14:05 PM

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Thank you, monamagda. It's always amusing to read the "leaps to conclusions" of posters, only to find them so ghastly wrong when provided with context. I love that description of Cather's concerning the author: "...those debauches of the imagination in which she continually permits herself to indulge."

*Laughing out loud*
Verbatim
Posted: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 2:20:28 PM
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"While Cather enjoyed the novels of George Eliot, the Brontës, and Jane Austen, she regarded most women writers with disdain, judging them overly sentimental and mawkish.[2]:110 Cather's biographer James Woodress notes that Cather "so completely ... embraced masculine values that when she wrote about women writers, she sounded like a patronizing man."[2]:110 One contemporary exception was Sarah Orne Jewett, who became Cather's friend and mentor. Jewett advised Cather to use female narrators in her fiction, but Cather preferred to write from a male point of view.[2]:214"
Quoted from one of her biographies to stimulate further leaps to conclusions.
Hans Wobbe
Posted: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 4:52:38 PM

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Interesting irony
Emel Rapchan
Posted: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 5:47:08 PM

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FounDit
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2020 11:48:04 AM

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Verbatim wrote:
"While Cather enjoyed the novels of George Eliot, the Brontës, and Jane Austen, she regarded most women writers with disdain, judging them overly sentimental and mawkish.[2]:110 Cather's biographer James Woodress notes that Cather "so completely ... embraced masculine values that when she wrote about women writers, she sounded like a patronizing man."[2]:110 One contemporary exception was Sarah Orne Jewett, who became Cather's friend and mentor. Jewett advised Cather to use female narrators in her fiction, but Cather preferred to write from a male point of view.[2]:214"
Quoted from one of her biographies to stimulate further leaps to conclusions.

And to what conclusion have you leapt, or suggest we leap to, based on this opinion of Cather?
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