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uncnforceable Options
Tara2
Posted: Monday, May 11, 2020 7:51:40 AM

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Joined: 11/8/2017
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Can you please explain "uncnforceable" and "desideratum"?

So if the C in ACDD stands for consistency, then in a sease the property is trivial;' and if it stands for correctness, then it is uncnforceable. Either way, therefore, the property is essentially meaningless, at least from a formal standpoint. As already indicated, our own preference would be to say that the C stands for correctness; then we can go on to regard "the correctness property" not really as a property as such, but rather as a desideratum.
FounDit
Posted: Monday, May 11, 2020 11:49:40 AM

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Tara2 wrote:
Can you please explain "uncnforceable" and "desideratum"?

So if the C in ACDD stands for consistency, then in a sense the property is trivial;' and if it stands for correctness, then it is uncnforceable. Either way, therefore, the property is essentially meaningless, at least from a formal standpoint. As already indicated, our own preference would be to say that the C stands for correctness; then we can go on to regard "the correctness property" not really as a property as such, but rather as a desideratum.

uncnforceable appears to be a typo. It should be "unenforceable". And desideratum is Latin for "a thing to be desired", or "a desirable thing".

So then, the paragraph would read similar to this:

"So if the C in ACDD stands for consistency, then in a sense the property is trivial;' and if it stands for correctness, then it is unenforceable (that is to say, we cannot insist that "C" always means "correctness"). Either way, therefore, the property is essentially meaningless, at least from a formal standpoint. As already indicated, our own preference would be to say that the C stands for correctness; then we can go on to regard "the correctness property" not really as a property as such, but rather as a desideratum (or, a thing to be desired).
kfoob
Posted: Monday, May 11, 2020 11:54:27 AM

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Location: Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Hmm I feel there is a typo here (actually 2) : So if the C in ACDD stands for consistency, then in a seNse the property is trivial;' and if it stands for correctness, then it is unEnforceable. Either way, therefore, the property is essentially meaningless, at least from a formal standpoint. As already indicated, our own preference would be to say that the C stands for correctness; then we can go on to regard "the correctness property" not really as a property as such, but rather as a desideratum." I believe the first word is 'Unenforceable - something that cannot be maintained, upheld. In this case, the author means the C cannot stand for 'correctness'. As for Desideratum, it refers to something desired, but not actually enacted. Desiderata relates to a list of things one wishes for, a 'wish list' of sorts.
Tara2
Posted: Monday, May 11, 2020 12:45:24 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,025
Neurons: 7,932
FounDit wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Can you please explain "uncnforceable" and "desideratum"?

So if the C in ACDD stands for consistency, then in a sense the property is trivial;' and if it stands for correctness, then it is uncnforceable. Either way, therefore, the property is essentially meaningless, at least from a formal standpoint. As already indicated, our own preference would be to say that the C stands for correctness; then we can go on to regard "the correctness property" not really as a property as such, but rather as a desideratum.

uncnforceable appears to be a typo. It should be "unenforceable". And desideratum is Latin for "a thing to be desired", or "a desirable thing".

So then, the paragraph would read similar to this:

"So if the C in ACDD stands for consistency, then in a sense the property is trivial;' and if it stands for correctness, then it is unenforceable (that is to say, we cannot insist that "C" always means "correctness"). Either way, therefore, the property is essentially meaningless, at least from a formal standpoint. As already indicated, our own preference would be to say that the C stands for correctness; then we can go on to regard "the correctness property" not really as a property as such, but rather as a desideratum (or, a thing to be desired).

Many thanks FounDit!!!
Sorry do you think 'unenforceable" can't mean that the C cannot stand for 'correctness' like what Kfoob said?
Tara2
Posted: Monday, May 11, 2020 12:45:47 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,025
Neurons: 7,932
kfoob wrote:
Hmm I feel there is a typo here (actually 2) : So if the C in ACDD stands for consistency, then in a seNse the property is trivial;' and if it stands for correctness, then it is unEnforceable. Either way, therefore, the property is essentially meaningless, at least from a formal standpoint. As already indicated, our own preference would be to say that the C stands for correctness; then we can go on to regard "the correctness property" not really as a property as such, but rather as a desideratum." I believe the first word is 'Unenforceable - something that cannot be maintained, upheld. In this case, the author means the C cannot stand for 'correctness'. As for Desideratum, it refers to something desired, but not actually enacted. Desiderata relates to a list of things one wishes for, a 'wish list' of sorts.

Many thanks!!!
FounDit
Posted: Monday, May 11, 2020 3:41:53 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 13,909
Neurons: 66,397
Tara2 wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Can you please explain "uncnforceable" and "desideratum"?

So if the C in ACDD stands for consistency, then in a sense the property is trivial;' and if it stands for correctness, then it is uncnforceable. Either way, therefore, the property is essentially meaningless, at least from a formal standpoint. As already indicated, our own preference would be to say that the C stands for correctness; then we can go on to regard "the correctness property" not really as a property as such, but rather as a desideratum.

uncnforceable appears to be a typo. It should be "unenforceable". And desideratum is Latin for "a thing to be desired", or "a desirable thing".

So then, the paragraph would read similar to this:

"So if the C in ACDD stands for consistency, then in a sense the property is trivial;' and if it stands for correctness, then it is unenforceable (that is to say, we cannot insist that "C" always means "correctness"). Either way, therefore, the property is essentially meaningless, at least from a formal standpoint. As already indicated, our own preference would be to say that the C stands for correctness; then we can go on to regard "the correctness property" not really as a property as such, but rather as a desideratum (or, a thing to be desired).

Many thanks FounDit!!!
Sorry do you think 'unenforceable" can't mean that the C cannot stand for 'correctness' like what Kfoob said?

Yes. Even if "C" stands for "correctness", it can't be made to stand for correctness all the time. That is not "enforceable" -- you can't make that be true all the time.
Tara2
Posted: Monday, May 11, 2020 3:50:05 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 2,025
Neurons: 7,932
FounDit wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Can you please explain "uncnforceable" and "desideratum"?

So if the C in ACDD stands for consistency, then in a sense the property is trivial;' and if it stands for correctness, then it is uncnforceable. Either way, therefore, the property is essentially meaningless, at least from a formal standpoint. As already indicated, our own preference would be to say that the C stands for correctness; then we can go on to regard "the correctness property" not really as a property as such, but rather as a desideratum.

uncnforceable appears to be a typo. It should be "unenforceable". And desideratum is Latin for "a thing to be desired", or "a desirable thing".

So then, the paragraph would read similar to this:

"So if the C in ACDD stands for consistency, then in a sense the property is trivial;' and if it stands for correctness, then it is unenforceable (that is to say, we cannot insist that "C" always means "correctness"). Either way, therefore, the property is essentially meaningless, at least from a formal standpoint. As already indicated, our own preference would be to say that the C stands for correctness; then we can go on to regard "the correctness property" not really as a property as such, but rather as a desideratum (or, a thing to be desired).

Many thanks FounDit!!!
Sorry do you think 'unenforceable" can't mean that the C cannot stand for 'correctness' like what Kfoob said?

Yes. Even if "C" stands for "correctness", it can't be made to stand for correctness all the time. That is not "enforceable" -- you can't make that be true all the time.

Many thanks. 💐
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