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attendance, oil, homnibus Options
yummyspringroll
Posted: Saturday, May 9, 2020 10:11:18 PM

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Joined: 9/25/2016
Posts: 60
Neurons: 29,852
Here is an excerpt from a short story by H.G. Wells titled The Listener.

Quote:

Oct. 8.—My week’s book is nicely kept, and so far is reasonable. Milk and sugar 7d., bread 6d., butter 8d., marmalade 6d., eggs 1s. 8d., laundress 2s. 9d., oil 6d., attendance 5s.; total 12s. 2d.

The landlady has a son who, she told me, is “somethink on a homnibus”. He comes occasionally to see her. I think he drinks, for he talks very loud, regardless of the hour of the day or night, and tumbles about over the furniture downstairs


1. What are s. and d.?
2. What does attendance here mean?
3. What oil is referred to here? cooking oil? kerosene? Why is it so significant that it has to be included in his list of spending? (was it a common everyday need at that period of time?)
4. What is homnibus here? (I'm guessing it's an intentional misspelling) Why does the lady say his son is "somethink on a homnibus"? What does that mean?

Thank you~!
georgew
Posted: Sunday, May 10, 2020 1:05:57 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/13/2016
Posts: 221
Neurons: 1,477
Location: Calabasas, California, United States
yummyspringroll wrote:
Here is an excerpt from a short story by H.G. Wells titled The Listener.

Quote:

Oct. 8.—My week’s book is nicely kept, and so far is reasonable. Milk and sugar 7d., bread 6d., butter 8d., marmalade 6d., eggs 1s. 8d., laundress 2s. 9d., oil 6d., attendance 5s.; total 12s. 2d.

The landlady has a son who, she told me, is “somethink on a homnibus”. He comes occasionally to see her. I think he drinks, for he talks very loud, regardless of the hour of the day or night, and tumbles about over the furniture downstairs


1. What are s. and d.?
2. What does attendance here mean?
3. What oil is referred to here? cooking oil? kerosene? Why is it so significant that it has to be included in his list of spending? (was it a common everyday need at that period of time?)
4. What is homnibus here? (I'm guessing it's an intentional misspelling) Why does the lady say his son is "somethink on a homnibus"? What does that mean?

Thank you~!


And you thought the US budget was complicated??!!

http://projectbritain.com/moneyold.htm

Sarrriesfan
Posted: Sunday, May 10, 2020 3:28:14 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 1,870
Neurons: 11,980
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
S and d refer to to old predecimal coinage used in the UK as georgew has linked to.
S=Shilling
D=Penny

Oil probably refer to lamp oil, without electricity oil lamps where the only way to provide light at night and at some times of the year a British city has darkness from 4.00pm to 9.00am people needed light in their homes and lamp oil was a major budget item.
I am unsure what attendance means here perhaps it is a term for the small jobs the landlady does like cleaning his room, someone else might know.
“Homnibus” I think is “Omnibus” with an extra “H” at the beginning, a bus meaning her son is a driver or conductor.

It’s a fairly common trope of British literature of the time, adding an extra “H” to words that should not have them, something that lower class people do particularly when they are trying to sound more sophisticated than they actually are.
The Landlady is trying to sound posh and make her sons job sound more important than it actually is.
It’s a device used in “My Fair Lady” the musical film amongst other works, Eliza played by Audrey Hepburn drops “H”s where they should be but adds them where they should not be.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gUQpoyfbWJ0
taurine
Posted: Sunday, May 10, 2020 4:03:47 AM

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Joined: 4/20/2016
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Location: South Dublin, Ireland
Attendance there means, service. It was used before proletariat took over the power claiming social justice ideals and murdering millions of people around the world, like never before people in such a large number.

As to the word "homnibus", I dare say that, it has appended form, h inserted or dropped. The word "homnibus" is actually more common known "omnibus".
Similar words are: habit, hopus, to name two, only.
taurine
Posted: Sunday, May 10, 2020 4:06:23 AM

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Location: South Dublin, Ireland
I could not know what Sarrriesfan has written as at that time while I was writing, Sarrriesfan's text was not included within the last posts.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Sunday, May 10, 2020 6:31:50 AM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Taurine it’s always good when more than one poster answers a question it shows if there is a consensus of opinion or divergent opinions.
yummyspringroll
Posted: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 6:35:56 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 9/25/2016
Posts: 60
Neurons: 29,852
Thank you everyone for your answers, they really help!

georgew
Quote:
And you thought the US budget was complicated??!!

Haha, I never think of the US budget because I'm not even American.
Anyway, the website you linked is about old money. Does that mean the British no longer use s. and d. when writing down amounts of money?


Sarrriesfan
thanks for the movie reference! never watched classic movies before but it seems cute, hehe!


taurine
Quote:
It was used before proletariat took over the power claiming social justice ideals and murdering millions of people around the world, like never before people in such a large number.

Is this a historical reference? which particular event are you referring? I'm not very good at world history but I'm intrigued to know more :D
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 6:28:15 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi!

Way back - last century when I was a teenager (or maybe in my early 20s), Britain changed currency from "twelve pence is a shilling; and twenty shillings is a pound" (£, s, d) to "one hundred new pence is a pound" (£, P).
So now we just say 'pounds' and 'pence'. and usually just write the pounds as a sort of decimal.
£11.99, £22.50, "£0.45" OR "45P" (eleven pound ninety-nine, twenty-two pound fifty, forty-five Pee).

I think Taurine is referring to the bad good old days when everyone who mattered had servants and slaves.
The proletariat (the 90% who were servants and slaves, not masters) insisted on some rights.
This is, of course, equivalent to the Communist Revolution in Russia.
yummyspringroll
Posted: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 10:19:57 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 9/25/2016
Posts: 60
Neurons: 29,852
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi!

Way back - last century when I was a teenager (or maybe in my early 20s), Britain changed currency from "twelve pence is a shilling; and twenty shillings is a pound" (£, s, d) to "one hundred new pence is a pound" (£, P).
So now we just say 'pounds' and 'pence'. and usually just write the pounds as a sort of decimal.
£11.99, £22.50, "£0.45" OR "45P" (eleven pound ninety-nine, twenty-two pound fifty, forty-five Pee).

I think Taurine is referring to the bad good old days when everyone who mattered had servants and slaves.
The proletariat (the 90% who were servants and slaves, not masters) insisted on some rights.
This is, of course, equivalent to the Communist Revolution in Russia.


got it, thank you Drag0nspeaker! I'm reading about Russian revolution now :D
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, May 13, 2020 2:06:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 1,870
Neurons: 11,980
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi!

Way back - last century when I was a teenager (or maybe in my early 20s), Britain changed currency from "twelve pence is a shilling; and twenty shillings is a pound" (£, s, d) to "one hundred new pence is a pound" (£, P).
So now we just say 'pounds' and 'pence'. and usually just write the pounds as a sort of decimal.
£11.99, £22.50, "£0.45" OR "45P" (eleven pound ninety-nine, twenty-two pound fifty, forty-five Pee).

I think Taurine is referring to the bad good old days when everyone who mattered had servants and slaves.
The proletariat (the 90% who were servants and slaves, not masters) insisted on some rights.
This is, of course, equivalent to the Communist Revolution in Russia.


Well except that the in the UK slavery has never been legal, servants yes but not slaves.
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