mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
Position of 'is' in question forms Options
Roops
Posted: Thursday, May 7, 2020 3:26:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/13/2013
Posts: 3,972
Neurons: 66,041
Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
The teacher is looking for her students.
To get the underlined words as answer, what should be the question?

Whom the teacher is looking for?

or

Whom is the teacher looking for?

Pls tell me which one is correct.
thar
Posted: Thursday, May 7, 2020 3:42:31 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 22,788
Neurons: 92,574
1 to answer your question.

To form a question, invert the subject (the teacher) and the auxiliary verb (be) after your question word.
If there is no auxiliary insert 'do'.

The teacher is looking for X.
Who is the teacher looking for?


The teacher has found Y.
What has the teacher found?

The teacher goes home.
Where does the teacher go?


Etc


If you don't invert the subject and verb, it is not a question. It is a noun phrase.
I know who the teacher is looking for.
What the teacher has found is interesting.
Tell me where the teacher goes!



2 a side-note about 'whom?'.
From my experience there are two versions of this.

One is the common version, that most people say most of the time.
The teacher is looking for the students.
You treat ' to look for' as the phrasal verb. Because 'for' has a particular meaning when used with that verb. It does not mean 'on behalf of'.
You don't bother with the object pronoun.

Who is the teacher looking for?



The other way is old-fashioned but some people say it naturally and others would use it in formal writing. I think this way will suit your style of English better.
The teacher is looking for the students.
You keep the preposition and the object noun together. Because the pronoun is directly after the preposition, you use the object pronoun 'whom'.

For whom is the teacher looking?

That will sound very stilted to most modern western English speakers, but it is not incorrect.
'whom is the teacher looking for' is not natural to me. If you are treating 'whom' as the object pronoun, it is normally put together with its preposition. 'For whom?'

It is the old 'grammar rule' (that native speakers do not follow) that you should not end a sentence with a preposition.
I think most education systems have given up trying to teach that 'rule' because it is so clearly wrong. But it is the old-fashioned way that fits in with using the correct case ending for 'whom'.

If you don't have the preposition immediately before the object pronoun, it is normal to ignore the case and just use the subject pronoun. Who......looking for?


Audiendus or someone will be able to say what is acceptable to teachers. I can only say what is normal.
Roops
Posted: Thursday, May 7, 2020 5:37:03 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/13/2013
Posts: 3,972
Neurons: 66,041
Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Thank you thar for your wonderful explanation.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.