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issued (with) Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Monday, April 6, 2020 11:36:31 AM
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The store was given verbal warnings but its premises continued to be overcrowded at about 7.15pm later that day, and was issued an advisory letter.

Should it be"issued with" instead?

Thanks.
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Monday, April 6, 2020 11:46:46 AM

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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
The store was given verbal warnings but its premises continued to be overcrowded at about 7.15 pm later that day and was issued an advisory letter.
I will write it as follows;

The store was issued verbal warnings, but its premises continued to be overcrowded till about 7.15 pm later that day, hence, was issued an advisory letter. IMO
tautophile
Posted: Monday, April 6, 2020 1:27:05 PM
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No, plain "issued" is fine and preferable to "issued with".
Koh Elaine
Posted: Monday, April 6, 2020 2:15:38 PM
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Sorry, my question comes after the reply.

My friend just told me that "issued" is AM, whereas "issued with" is BE? Is he correct?

Thanks.
tautophile
Posted: Monday, April 6, 2020 2:47:23 PM
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I don't know whether "issued" is AmE, and "issued with" is BrE. I don't think there's any difference between AmE and BrE usage in this case. But as I say, "issued" is preferable to "issued with", IMHO.
Koh Elaine
Posted: Monday, April 6, 2020 7:56:14 PM
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Joined: 7/4/2012
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tautophile wrote:
I don't know whether "issued" is AmE, and "issued with" is BrE. I don't think there's any difference between AmE and BrE usage in this case. But as I say, "issued" is preferable to "issued with", IMHO.
Thanks.
FounDit
Posted: Monday, April 6, 2020 8:54:31 PM

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People do sometimes say, "issued with", but technically speaking, I think it is wrong.

The action of issuing means to give forth, or proceed from a source, in this case, an authority. Much like a police officer would issue a ticket to a motorist.

The motorist gets the ticket as a consequence of some action that is forbidden. In your example the store did something forbidden and was issued a letter from an authority.

So it was the letter that was issued. Saying the store was "issued with" a letter would, strictly speaking, mean the store and the letter were both "issued", or sent out.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, April 7, 2020 5:49:51 AM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom


I too have no idea whether using "with" is only done on one side of the pond or not. But it is definitely common utterance:

"We were issued with the instructions on Monday."
"He was issued with enough masks for the entire village."

HOWEVER, "the store" - a building, a non-sentient entity - wasn't issued a notice. The Management/The owners/The Staff of the shop were the ones issued with something...buildings can't read!Dancing
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