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Quarantine Kitchen: Keeping Your Spirits Up With Good Food! Options
Epiphileon
Posted: Friday, April 3, 2020 4:15:56 AM

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Now that I only work for 2 hours in the early morning, I've been trying to make dinners that give us something to look forward to every day. Last night I did a variation on a novel recipe I tried quite a while ago and it came out fantastic. I was thinking that we could have a topic here where we could share recipes with each other as it seems difficult to come up with something new every day. You can post a link to a recipe you've found, type in your own recipe, or a combination of the two like this one. I have found it is a nice distraction and it has worked well to give us something fun to do together, as well as getting a really good meal in the process.

Bacon-Wrapped Cheesesteak Meatloaf PREP/COOK TIME 45/50 mins

What I changed was I used 1.25 pounds of lean ground beef, 1.25 pounds of ground hot sausage, the cheese underneath the peppers instead of provolone is a layer of grated 3 cheese mix (parmesan, asiago, romano) and a layer of mozzarella, I cut the cayenne pepper from 1 teaspoon to a half, and only used one pack of bacon so 14 slices instead of the 20 called for. This has earned my new "stupid good" food rating as it is so good you're likely to eat a stupid amount of it.

I also changed the prep method a bit, and it made it a ton easier than their method. Rather than using a piece of foil and patting the meat into a rectangular baking pan, I lined a large rectangular baking pan with parchment paper, spread the meat out on it then covered it with another piece of paper and used a rolling pin to get it evenly spread. Also the easiest way to mix the meats is to put them in a mixing bowl add the spices and then just get all squishy with your hands.
I also cheated and used two bags of frozen pepper strips and one of diced onions from the grocery but if you use fresh vegetables I highly recommend a couple of different colors of bell peppers.




ETA Oh I actually increased the unwrapped bake time to 35 minutes, you could probably do 40 maybe get the bacon a little crispier. I thought of putting it on broil for a few minutes but in a gas stove I was afraid I might get a grease fire.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, April 3, 2020 7:42:50 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Sounds tasty!

My favourite "not very time-consuming" thing - can't really call it a recipe - is good for irregular shopping-days (sometimes it's ten days between my visits to the shops).

It's random, so if my shopping day meets a day when others decided to stock up on ham and there's none left, I use Angus mince (ground very lean beef, from Aberdeen Angus cattle), but "lamb mince" would be OK too, though that's a bit more fatty. I suppose goat, kangaroo, dog, snake or buffalo would work, too, but they're a bit expensive.

Day 1. (usually early evening) put dried pulses to soak in cold water. This is often yellow split-peas, but sometimes includes mixed bean salad, lentils, green peas - whatever I have most of in the cupboard. Sometimes I change the water after a few hours which reduces the Sulphur content.

Day 2. (12-24 hours later) stick the pulses in a sauce-pan, bring to the boil and simmer for 20 minutes or so (if chick-peas and yellow split-peas are the main one, then a bit longer). Meanwhile sear the mince (chopped ham doesn't need any searing). Add it to the pulses and bring back to boiling point. Transfer to the slow-cooker, and go to bed. You can add soaked barley at the same time as the mince - if you boil it with the pulses, it tends to thicken too much.

Day 3. (12 hours later). Dice and boil some potatoes with onion and/or carrots; maybe some cabbage; and some rice with spring onion/chives (whatever I happened to buy).
While they're boiling, separate the "meat&pease pudding" from the slow cooker into a couple of bowls. Add a random mix of herbs to one, and a random mix of hot curry, spice and chilli to the other.

I usually end up with three or four "main meals" in the freezer for ninety minute's work (split over three days) - curry & rice; Scotch Broth & spuds; Chilli & rice; Curry & chips (with a few minute's extra work frying the chips).
Never quite predictable, but I have enough experience with herbs & spices that I don't mix up something inedible and, despite being all cooked at the same time, each meal is different.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, April 3, 2020 8:02:45 AM

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Looks nice I’ll have to try it sometime.
Yesterday I made a Bread and Butter Pudding, something my Gran used to make she would store the heels of the loaves of bread she had in the freezer to make this waste not want.

https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/food/recipes/a537264/bread-and-butter-pudding/

Take 6 slices of stale bread and butter them, then layer these in an oven proof dish with an ounce of sultanas and currants (each)
Make a mixture of the 3 eggs, a pint of milk and sugar (I used a sugar alternative) and mixed spices.
Pour this over the bread and leave it to soak in for at least 30 minutes, longer is better.
Bake in an oven for 45 minutes at 180c or 356f.

To get something like this.


Because I like ginger I added ground ginger and chopped stem ginger to give some kick.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, April 3, 2020 8:05:13 AM

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Drago sounds like the sort of thing my Scottish Gran would make, every time we visited Saturday was mince and tattles day.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, April 3, 2020 8:11:23 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Sarrriesfan wrote:
Yesterday I made a Bread and Butter Pudding,

It's YEARS since I had that - I have all the ingredients. (Well, I can save up the crusts for a loaf or two).
My mum used mixed fruit (sultanas, currants, raisins and dried citrus-peel).

When I have a bit of time I'll do it - allspice, nutmeg and ginger . . .
Hope123
Posted: Friday, April 3, 2020 4:00:46 PM

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Joined: 3/23/2015
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Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
“Just be careful because people are going crazy from being in lockdown! Actually I've just been talking about this with the microwave and toaster while drinking coffee and all of us agreed that things are getting bad. I didn't mention anything to the washing machine as she puts a different spin on everything and certainly not to the fridge as he is acting cold and distant. I haven't spoken to the kettle....he was steaming and the vacuum cleaner told me to suck it up (rude!!) In the end the iron calmed me down as she said everything will be fine - no situation is too pressing.” (And it will all be ironed out eventually.)

Love this - pinched it from someone😁 Pass it on 🤪

Drago and Sarri - we had that a lot as kids. It was the only thing my Dad knew how to make. We called it bread pudding. Bread preferably stale chunks, milk, eggs, raisins, sugar. Probably cinnamon. Don't remember butter in it.

Tasty!
Hope123
Posted: Friday, April 3, 2020 4:11:01 PM

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Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
Epi,

We are just eating the same old tried and true recipes. Mostly plain meals. Right now we are emptying our fridge and freezers because of a planned move third week in April. We are waiting for the new list of essential services.

I always make my own bread and buns and today am going to make a banana cake and date squares now I have some flour. We ordered groceries ten days ago and they were ready for pick up today. Everybody must be baking and bread making because there was no organic AP flour, not even any unbleached. But I did get a bag of regular flour. I use mostly whole wheat flour and have a bag of that already.

Enjoy your new recipes! Good thread idea.
Epiphileon
Posted: Friday, April 3, 2020 4:21:22 PM

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Joined: 3/22/2009
Posts: 4,270
Neurons: 165,996
Drag0nspeaker wrote:

My favourite "not very time-consuming" thing - can't really call it a recipe - is good for irregular shopping-days (sometimes it's ten days between my visits to the shops).


Wow Drag0 that sounds very interesting. The first time I read it through I was like nope not for me, but then I thought about how much my aversion to any vegetable content in my food has been modifying over the last few years and I'm thinking of giving this a try. A couple of questions though. Do you have rough proportions of the various ingredients?

Drag0nspeaker wrote:

Never quite predictable, but I have enough experience with herbs & spices that I don't mix up something inedible and, despite being all cooked at the same time, each meal is different.


This may put it out of reach of my cooking skills, I've only come to an appreciation of cooking late in life and my experience with herbs and spices is pretty limited.
Epiphileon
Posted: Friday, April 3, 2020 4:24:52 PM

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Sarrriesfan wrote:
Looks nice I’ll have to try it sometime.
Yesterday I made a Bread and Butter Pudding, something my Gran used to make she would store the heels of the loaves of bread she had in the freezer to make this waste not want.


Thanks Sarrriesfan, I've heard many references to bread pudding over the years but never had any idea what it was. What exactly are sultanas, seedless grapes? Is that right?
Epiphileon
Posted: Friday, April 3, 2020 4:30:14 PM

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Joined: 3/22/2009
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Hope123 wrote:
Epi,

We are just eating the same old tried and true recipes. Mostly plain meals. Right now we are emptying our fridge and freezers because of a planned move third week in April. We are waiting for the new list of essential services.


Thanks Hope, I hope everything goes well with your move. Got any good blueberry recipes. Sam's club had 6 pound bags of frozen blueberries so I have plenty right now. I just discovered their delectableness last year. I have made a blueberry maple syrup pie a few times since then but it's always got for tipping the scale higher again so I gotta watch that one.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, April 3, 2020 4:30:34 PM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Epiphileon wrote:
Sarrriesfan wrote:
Looks nice I’ll have to try it sometime.
Yesterday I made a Bread and Butter Pudding, something my Gran used to make she would store the heels of the loaves of bread she had in the freezer to make this waste not want.


Thanks Sarrriesfan, I've heard many references to bread pudding over the years but never had any idea what it was. What exactly are sultanas, seedless grapes? Is that right?


They are dried seedless grapes, the type of thing you put into a fruit cake.


In America they are called raisins, but we differentiate between different varieties of dried fruit.

Hope123 we also have bread pudding but it is slightly different to bread and butter pudding.

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/bread-pudding-0

You tear the bread into small pieces rather than use slices and you do not butter them, it’s also in the oven for twice as long.

Hope123
Posted: Saturday, April 4, 2020 11:53:41 AM

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Joined: 3/23/2015
Posts: 9,170
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Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
Getting recipes - back later with them.

::::

This alludes to food and is cute to cheer you up.

A short poem to lift your spirits -mainly for the girls. (We still call ourselves girls. Written by an Aussie or a Brit?)

I'm normally a social girl

I love to meet my mates

But lately with the virus here

We can't go out the gates.



You see, we are the 'oldies' now

We need to stay inside

If they haven't seen us for a while

They'll think we've upped and died.


They'll never know the things we did

Before we got this old

There wasn't any Facebook

So not everything was told.


We may seem sweet old ladies

Who would never be uncouth

But we grew up in the 60s -

If you only knew the truth!


There was sex and drugs and rock 'n roll

The pill and miniskirts

We smoked, we drank, we partied

And were quite outrageous flirts.


Then we settled down, got married

And turned into someone's mum,

Somebody's wife, then nana,

Who on earth did we become?


We didn't mind the change of pace

Because our lives were full

But to bury us before we're dead

Is like a red rag to a bull!


So here you find me stuck inside

For 4 weeks, maybe more

I finally found myself again

Then I had to close the door!


It didn’t really bother me

I'd while away the hour

I'd bake for all the family

But I've got no bloody flour!


Now Netflix is just wonderful

I like a gutsy thriller

I'm swooning over Idris

Or some random sexy killer.


At least I've got a stash of booze

For when I'm being idle

There's wine and whiskey, even gin

If I'm feeling suicidal!


So let's all drink to lockdown

To recovery and health

And hope this bloody virus

Doesn't decimate our wealth.


We'll all get through the crisis

And be back to join our mates

Just hoping I'm not far too wide

To fit through the flaming gates!

Hope123
Posted: Saturday, April 4, 2020 5:25:16 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2015
Posts: 9,170
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Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
Hello Epi and Sarrri,

Sarrri, we never had a recipe - just leftover bread, judge as to amount of milk and egg, throw in some raisins and sugar, and I don’t remember for sure but if I were doing it now, I'd sprinkle cinnamon to cover the top. Egg and milk are two my worst sensitivities so I have to be careful with them. I use quail and duck eggs now but even those I can't repeat too often. So no bread pudding these days.

Epi, we make a blueberry smoothie every fourth day on my rotary diet. Dump some blueberries, maybe about a cup for two servings, into a blender, add rice milk to cover plus some depending upon thickness you like (I use Rice Dream) and press liquify. You can use cow milk but would probably need a sweetener. Rice milk is inherently sweet enough. I suppose you could add vanilla or cinnamon - we like it as is with just blueberries and rice milk. I thaw the blueberries ahead of time or in microwave.

All I ever bake with blueberries is pie. I tried to make muffins a couple of times but they were too soggy so I threw out the recipe. The photos posted are an old sheet of recipes and I use a similar one for my pies. I am disappointed in the legibility of the photos - don't know if they will be of use to you or not.

I may have made blueberry pudding using one of my Robin Hood recipe books from when I got married but I have not done that for some time. You make a sauce for it. There's a pudding recipe here. Make sauce for pancakes too.

Just research online and you'll find more recipes than you ever wanted to know.

My pie is slightly different than the one in the photo - it calls for 4 c blueberries, 1 c sugar, 2T flour, 2 T butter, 1/4 t salt, 1/4 t cinnamon and 1/8 t nutmeg optional. You can put lemon juice in the pastry instead of the spices. Method on this photo is the same. T = tablespoon, t = teaspoon

Blueberries have excellent nutrition but unfortunately, except for the smoothie, these recipes will have the same effect on your body as the maple pie unless you limit your portions.

Enjoy!

(Assume you wife is doing ok these days?)



1 die 2 dice



Epiphileon
Posted: Sunday, April 5, 2020 4:08:38 AM

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Great poem Hope! Thanks for the smoothie idea! That's a great one hadn't even thought of the liquid potential of blueberries definitely going to check it out. Now I wish I'd bought two of those giant bags.
Epiphileon
Posted: Sunday, April 5, 2020 7:41:13 AM

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Joined: 3/22/2009
Posts: 4,270
Neurons: 165,996
This recipe will probably have Italian cooks cursing a blue streak, but it's really easy, fast, and amazingly good.

Fastest Lasagna in the West


Ingredients
Lasagna noodles (ready to bake variety for ultimate ease)
1 or 2 jars of pizza sauce, have 2 on hand probably won't use all
1.5 pounds (680 grams)* of ground hot sausage.
24 oz (680grams) Cottage or Ricotta Cheese
2 cups (well damn does 1/2 a liter make sense?) of mozzarella cheese, this is probably a minimum depends if your a cheese freak like me, I no doubt used more.

Directions
Brown the hot sausage in a frying pan, breaking it up as much as possible, this is critical to being able to get 3 layers.
Drain as much of the grease as possible!

Put a thin layer of pizza sauce on the bottom of a 10.5"x7.5"x2.5"
(‪26.67‬x19.05x6.35 centimeters) casserole dish (deeper would be nice may even allow another layer)

Depending on the brand you may have to try the amazing feat of trimming the bottom layer of noodles to fit if using the ready to bake variety. In any case, put in a layer of noodles.

Cover noodles with sauce.

evenly spread 1/3 of hot sausage

dollop around a bunch of the curdley cheese

cover with grated mozzarella

add next layer of noodles

press down, if ready to bake noodles you can do this with your fingertips, if boiled use a burger flipper (not really sure what people call these things I've heard them referred to as spatulas but to me that is a different thing.)

Repeat these steps twice more.
Spread sauce on top layer of noodles
Liberally cover with mozzarella cheese
If using ready to bake noodles consult package for baking time and temp, I used 45 minutes at 400f (204c) degrees and it worked well.

I'm guessing prep time on this is 20 minutes depending on how fast you brown the sausage.

Not responsible for waistline expansion!

*not responsible for wacko results of converting to a rational measuring system, particularly the size of the casserole dish.


Epiphileon
Posted: Monday, April 6, 2020 4:53:24 AM

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Well hmmmm, I tried the above last night with ricotta cheese and was not impressed, I actually liked the cottage cheese version much better. I also happened to read the recipe on the package of noodles and realized that anyone who knows much about cooking now knows my claims to being a rookie at it are confirmed. I think next time I'm going to use the same ingredients and the few that are missing and try mixing the cheese as directed.

I did try a new variation with the cheeses last night though and added a 3 grated cheese mix of romano, parmesan, and asagio. I used about 60/40 this mix to mozzarella and the cheese got a bit too crusty, I'm thinking a better mix would be 70/30
Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, April 7, 2020 12:11:33 AM

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Try mine Epi!

Recipe ingredients:

Lasagna Noodles 1/4 lb (about 9 pieces)
Oil 3T
Onions 0.5 Cup finely chopped
Garlic 2 cloves finely chopped
Hamburger 0.5 lb
Tomato Paste 6 oz can
Tomatoes 20 oz (I use the whole 28 oz can)
Mushrooms 1 tin 10 oz? optional
Salt 1 tsp
Pepper 0.5 tsp
Basil 0.25 tsp
Oregano 0.25 tsp
Sugar 1/2 tsp
Cottage Cheese 0.5 lbs dry
Cheese 0.5 lb mozzarella or swiss (I usually use more cheese)

Cook Lasagna noodles, drain and rinse. Saute onions, garlic in 2 T oil. Brown hamburg, add tomatoes, seasonings, and sugar. Cook 30 mins. Grease casserole, arrange in layers. 350F 30 Mins. (I think the original recipe tossed the cooked lasagna with the third T of oil. I don’t measure the oil - just dump some in the electric frypan.)

I double this recipe of the main ingredients excluding noodles and cheeses, and put the second half into Mason jars enough for two and into the freezer for spaghetti sauce.

We make up a batch of chili in a second electric frypan at the same time - uses similar ingredients so that makes the mess at all once. We package the chili in single serving sized jars and freeze. Take out of freezer the night before - or very carefully thaw in microwave on defrost.
Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, April 7, 2020 12:34:54 AM

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Joined: 3/23/2015
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Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
I make my own bread and buns all the time. You need a bread machine for this recipe and ingredients must go in in order given. Never use the delay function with egg in the recipe. Accurate measurements are very important, as is the temperature of flour.

Use a liquid (not dry measure) measuring cup for the water and get down to eye level to see the 1 cup line. My cups have metric too but I use cups.Then add 2 T of water and warm in microwave for 15 seconds. Pour into machine bread pan.

You make the dough in the machine and then shape and allow the buns to rise again before baking. About 50 mins and then preheat oven. You must get the dough out and shape immediately as soon as the dough cycle shuts off before it can rise again in the machine. My oven is set at 375F for 15-17 minutes. Just bake until brown on bottom.

You do save money making your own bread and you can put your own wholesome ingredients in. It takes about three minutes to put the ingredients in and maybe 5 minutes to shape the 15 buns into a 12 x 15 pan. But you do have to be there three hours after putting the ingredients to mix, or to remove the loaf.

I have a new Cuisinart Convection Breadmaker that I like very much. There are lots of recipes that come in the instruction booklet.

Put the ingredients into the machine bread pan in the following order. I use filtered water and all organic ingredients. I have not tried milk lately. Covering your hands with oil and greasing the pan with butter makes it easier to handle the dough and remove the cooked buns.

1 and 1/8 cup room temperature (important) water (1/8 cup is equal to 2 Tablespoons)
(the recipe says liquid but I always use water.)
1 teaspoon salt (seasalt)
2 Tablespoons oil (I use olive)
1 egg (I have used chicken or duck egg) I buy large chicken eggs.
1 and 1/2 cups all purpose unbleached white wheat flour and 2 c whole wheat flour (level with a knife after dunking the tip of the knife in to flour to settle it) at room temperature (important) Plus 3 Tablespoons of gluten.
1/4 cup sugar + 1 tsp (I cut the recipe from a larger amount)
1Tablespoon bread machine yeast

Set machine to Dough setting. Takes 1 hour forty minutes. Take out and shape 15 buns. Or one loaf and 3 buns in two loaf pans. Cover wth greased wad paper. Rise 1 hour or so. Take buns out of oven at 15 minutes, move rack to lowest level, and finish bread 8 minutes. Brush tops with butter. Enjoy! Check online for how to shape bread or buns. You can make all kinds of shapes of buns. I make mostly dinner rolls or HB buns.

Slice loaf, put into Ziploc containers, and freeze after one day as it goes stale. No preservatives. I bought a bread cutter apparatus that comes with a really sharp bread knife.

There is a request every family dinner for Nana to bring rolls.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, April 7, 2020 2:51:27 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 1,809
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Hope123 wrote:
I make my own bread and buns all the time. You need a bread machine for this recipe and ingredients must go in in order given. Never use the delay function with egg in the recipe. Accurate measurements are very important, as is the temperature of flour.

Use a liquid (not dry measure) measuring cup for the water and get down to eye level to see the 1 cup line. My cups have metric too but I use cups.Then add 2 T of water and warm in microwave for 15 seconds. Pour into machine bread pan.

You make the dough in the machine and then shape and allow the buns to rise again before baking. About 50 mins and then preheat oven. You must get the dough out and shape immediately as soon as the dough cycle shuts off before it can rise again in the machine. My oven is set at 375F for 15-17 minutes. Just bake until brown on bottom.

You do save money making your own bread and you can put your own wholesome ingredients in. It takes about three minutes to put the ingredients in and maybe 5 minutes to shape the 15 buns into a 12 x 15 pan. But you do have to be there three hours after putting the ingredients to mix, or to remove the loaf.

I have a new Cuisinart Convection Breadmaker that I like very much. There are lots of recipes that come in the instruction booklet.

Put the ingredients into the machine bread pan in the following order. I use filtered water and all organic ingredients. I have not tried milk lately. Covering your hands with oil and greasing the pan with butter makes it easier to handle the dough and remove the cooked buns.

1 and 1/8 cup room temperature (important) water (1/8 cup is equal to 2 Tablespoons)
(the recipe says liquid but I always use water.)
1 teaspoon salt (seasalt)
2 Tablespoons oil (I use olive)
1 egg (I have used chicken or duck egg) I buy large chicken eggs.
1 and 1/2 cups all purpose unbleached white wheat flour and 2 c whole wheat flour (level with a knife after dunking the tip of the knife in to flour to settle it) at room temperature (important) Plus 3 Tablespoons of gluten.
1/4 cup sugar + 1 tsp (I cut the recipe from a larger amount)
1Tablespoon bread machine yeast

Set machine to Dough setting. Takes 1 hour forty minutes. Take out and shape 15 buns. Or one loaf and 3 buns in two loaf pans. Cover wth greased wad paper. Rise 1 hour or so. Take buns out of oven at 15 minutes, move rack to lowest level, and finish bread 8 minutes. Brush tops with butter. Enjoy! Check online for how to shape bread or buns. You can make all kinds of shapes of buns. I make mostly dinner rolls or HB buns.

Slice loaf, put into Ziploc containers, and freeze after one day as it goes stale. No preservatives. I bought a bread cutter apparatus that comes with a really sharp bread knife.

There is a request every family dinner for Nana to bring rolls.


Looks like a nice recipe I’ll have to convert it to British measures we don’t use cups here.
Although I kneed by hand and prove in the proving draw of my oven, it’s a good workout for the arms.
Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, April 7, 2020 10:06:28 AM

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Joined: 3/23/2015
Posts: 9,170
Neurons: 52,433
Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
Sarrri, I actually converted this recipe from one that made double and I used to knead too. It is from an old Robin Hood flour booklet that is 60 + years old. Robin Hood is a brand of flour over here. That's why it is still in cups. Although we are metric in Canada, a lot of baking is still in cups.

Right now there is a shortage of yeast where I live - imagine it is pretty much everywhere as people are adapting to new (old) methods of getting food. I had a full jar of bread machine yeast so am good for a while. It may be easier to get than regular yeast, I don't know.

Edited: https://recipeland.com/how-to/liquid-dry-measurement-conversi-325

I have a few more recipes on my iPad from when friends requested them, and since it is so easy to copy and paste, I'll find some time later to post more.







Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, April 7, 2020 10:58:56 AM

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Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 1,809
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
This is a recipe I sometimes bake, I adapted it from a bread the UK supermarket Tesco makes.
Raisin, Cranberry and Cashew Bread.

500g strong bread flour
300 ml hand warm water
100g raisins
100g dried cranberries
75g chopped cashews
1 packet yeast
1 egg
Pinch of cinnamon
Pinch of nutmeg.
1 tablespoon of sugar.
A few cashews split into halves.

Mix the flour, water, salt, sugar and egg to form a dough but crack the egg into a separate bowl first and gentle stir it, pour most of the egg into the mix but reserve a tiny amount.
Kneed the dough for around 10 minutes when it stops being sticky it will be done.
Put the mix into a warm place to rise.
Leave for at least 1 hr.
Then knock it back by taking the mixture out of the bowl and giving it a gentle kneed.
As you do this add the spices, cranberries, raisins and cashews.
Form a bloomer loaf on a grease baking tray or use a more traditional bread tin.
Stud the top of the loaf with the halved cashews.
Use the reserved egg as a wash on top the loaf.
Leave for 10 minutes in a warm place.
Bake at 230c for 20-25 minutes until it looks golden and the base sounds hollow when tapped.
My oven has a steam function but you can put an ovenproof dish of water on a lower shelf beneath the bread, the steam created makes better bread.

Slice, spread with butter and enjoy.
Epiphileon
Posted: Wednesday, April 8, 2020 4:35:50 AM

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Joined: 3/22/2009
Posts: 4,270
Neurons: 165,996
Hope123 wrote:
Try mine Epi!

We package the chili in single serving sized jars and freeze. Take out of freezer the night before - or very carefully thaw in microwave on defrost.

Thanks Hope, I'll try that.

You freeze jars? Glass jars? What kind? Would mason jars work?
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, April 8, 2020 6:52:25 AM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 17,074
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Epi -

I'm sure Hope will be back to answer you, but, in the meantime: I gave up using plastic in my kitchen gradually and now only use glass/china. (I rather think Hope is the same).

I'm sure you have "Pyrex" in North America? They've always been around and are still tough, durable, hard to break.

But now there's such a choice of glass/china vessels which are great: you can mix in them, cook in them, serve from them, put the left-overs back in the fridge/freezer...all in the same container. Saves Soooo much washing up too!

And hey, you can even designer-co-ordinate if you're fussy about your kitchen decore!Whistle
Hope123
Posted: Wednesday, April 8, 2020 4:17:27 PM

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Hi Epi,

Yup. I have 7-8 different sizes of Mason jars. I store all my freezer food in them. Just leave at least about 1/2 inch at the top for expansion. I usually leave the lid off warm/hot stuff till they are frozen or at least put the lids on lightly and then take them off hours later and put them back on to make sure there is no vacuum. BTW if the jar narrows towards the top do not fill past the widest spot. Learned that the hard way long time ago after I broke a couple.

When thawing in the microwave I put them on low power but usually take them out of the freezer the night before and thaw them in the fridge. Or you can put them into water in a clean sink and leave to thaw for half an hour or so. I never leave food to thaw on the counter.

I have never tried to freeze anything in Pyrex and you do have to be careful with Pyrex when there is a temperature change. For example, never put hot pyrex into water or vice versa. Do they even make dishes for freezer storage?
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, April 9, 2020 3:16:48 AM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Hope123 wrote:
Hi Epi,

Yup. I have 7-8 different sizes of Mason jars. I store all my freezer food in them. Just leave at least about 1/2 inch at the top for expansion. I usually leave the lid off warm/hot stuff till they are frozen or at least put the lids on lightly and then take them off hours later and put them back on to make sure there is no vacuum. BTW if the jar narrows towards the top do not fill past the widest spot. Learned that the hard way long time ago after I broke a couple.

When thawing in the microwave I put them on low power but usually take them out of the freezer the night before and thaw them in the fridge. Or you can put them into water in a clean sink and leave to thaw for half an hour or so. I never leave food to thaw on the counter.

I have never tried to freeze anything in Pyrex and you do have to be careful with Pyrex when there is a temperature change. For example, never put hot pyrex into water or vice versa. Do they even make dishes for freezer storage?


Yes Pyrex can be frozen, in the UK and elsewhere there is a range that is capable of going from frozen to a hot oven and visa versa.
https://www.pyrexuk.com/products/cook-freeze-glass-rectangular-dish-with-plastic-lid

Although I would allow food to cool to room temperature first before it goes into my freezer, but large commercial freezer that have steel racks in would be okay,
Epiphileon
Posted: Thursday, April 9, 2020 4:47:39 AM

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Hope123 wrote:
Hi Epi,
I have never tried to freeze anything in Pyrex and you do have to be careful with Pyrex when there is a temperature change. For example, never put hot pyrex into water or vice versa.


LOL, thanks for the info Hope, I'm laughing because I remember spending an entire afternoon in a friends basement as a teenager heating up a bunch of old lab glassware we found near a dumpster with a torch and dropping it into a washbasin filled with cold water. There may have been some plant matter involved as well, but I can neither confirm nor deny that. If there was we probably didn't inhale!
Hope123
Posted: Thursday, April 9, 2020 8:40:03 AM

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Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
Lol, Epi. That is the kind of stuff kids back then did to “get into mischief”. I assume the fun was in the breaking.

Last time I bought Pyrex while renting a condo in FL 3-4 years ago and looked at the label instructions, it said do not immerse in water when hot.

Most of my Pyrex is old - some of it 58 years old, given to me as shower/wedding gifts. That attests to its durability. I still have a hand mixer my maid of honour gave me as a wedding gift. It is heavier than the newer ones but the cord is detachable and it has a third beater for whipping egg whites or whipping cream.

Sarri, I'll have to check for the freezer to oven Pyrex if I need any more but having owned two houses at the same time, I accumulated a lot of extra dishes when we sold both places and moved to the condo.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, April 9, 2020 6:50:24 PM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Today we had a casserole.
750g Chicken Thighs on the bone ( they have more flavour)
1 Red Onion chopped
1 Red Pepper chopped
1 large Mushroom ( this was one we had in the fridge for a week and needed using up) chopped
Thyme
Parsley
Half a bottle of red wine
2 large potatoes chopped with skin on.
Water ( I added this by eye so I cannot tell you exactly how much)

Toss the chicken thighs in flour.
Get your casserole dish put some oil in the bottom, and cook the onion pepper so that they begin to colour.
Add the chicken thighs and brown them off the flour on the outside will thicken the sauce.
Add the mushroom so it gets some colour.
Then add the red wine and potatoes.
Top it up with water until the food is just covered.
Add the thyme and parsley.
Slow cook for 3 hrs at 110C
You get a lovely casserole with chicken that falls off the bone.
Epiphileon
Posted: Friday, April 10, 2020 9:28:57 AM

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Good Morning Sarrriesfan, That sounds good it so happens I have chicken thighs on hand, I'll try this out. I realize though I do not have wine on hand is there anything else you could recommend. If I do need wine specifically what type of red would you say to use?

Also, I'm wondering if there is another terminology problem, what do you mean by a casserole dish? Most of the initial processes you describe I would do in a skillet.
Epiphileon
Posted: Friday, April 10, 2020 9:38:40 AM

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Of course, we also need to cover the treats side of the menu, so here's a great recipe I found for Chocolate chip cookies.
Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies

The only things I changed about this were I used white chocolate chips and I made them a little smaller getting 28 cookies rather than just 16.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, April 10, 2020 11:22:11 AM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Epiphileon wrote:
Good Morning Sarrriesfan, That sounds good it so happens I have chicken thighs on hand, I'll try this out. I realize though I do not have wine on hand is there anything else you could recommend. If I do need wine specifically what type of red would you say to use?

Also, I'm wondering if there is another terminology problem, what do you mean by a casserole dish? Most of the initial processes you describe I would do in a skillet.


I like a Merlot or a Malbec, if you did it without wine then some chicken stock or vegetable stock would work at a pinch.
Something like a Fleurie is too light.

A casserole dish is a large metal pan with a lid, it has high sides that allow it to contain the ingredients within it.
You can start of cooking things as you would a skillet or frying pan and then transfer to the oven for the final part of the cooking cooking.


The one I actual own is this one.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/ProCook-Professional-Non-Stick-Casserole-Heat-Resistant/dp/B009LU9HO0?ref_=s9_apbd_orecs_hd_bw_bn9or&pf_rd_r=SQD39MCE53TYVB870VNH&pf_rd_p=a1415105-ac30-571f-97fc-4d410c141ca9&pf_rd_s=merchandised-search-10&pf_rd_t=BROWSE&pf_rd_i=11715821&th=1

Some people use glass or ceramic dishes that are similar.
Epiphileon
Posted: Saturday, April 11, 2020 3:37:09 AM

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Thanks Sarrriesfan, I don't have one of those looks like a handy item to put on my wish list though. I think I'll try the Merlot, I'm pretty sure I can get that at the grocery store without a special trip to the state liquor store.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, April 11, 2020 5:09:36 AM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
You can always use a skillet for the first party and transfer to an oven proof dish for te later cooking.
Epiphileon
Posted: Saturday, April 25, 2020 4:56:07 AM

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A coworker told me about an amazing way to make Chicken Parmesan!
Rolled! Yep, rolled.

Take the chicken breasts and trim off any hanging bits.

Place between two sheets of plastic wrap.

Using the smooth side of a meat tenderizing hammer, (or some other instrument of blunt force trauma on a chicken breast), pound it down to as thin as you can while maintaining structural integrity.

Sprinkle breasts with whatever seasonings you like. (Usually, this would be a waste of time as they would come off in the egg washes but as they will be rolled before then this works and to wonderful effect.) I used garlic, Italian seasoning, and ground pepper.

Spread ricotta cheese on breasts
Toss on some grated mozzarella
Roll up from the longest edge as tight as possible
Depending on how big the breasts were you may have to cut them in half at this point. 9 inch long rolls are unwieldy in the next steps.

using tongs run breasts through an egg wash then roll in flour.
run through the egg wash a second time then roll in Italian seasoned bread crumbs.

Have a pan with two tablespoons or so of hot olive oil ready to put them in when they come out of the crumbs and fry until golden brown.

Place in a casserole dish, pour on marinara sauce, and cover with grated parmesan.

Bake for however long it takes for the internal temp of the chicken to reach 165°f (74°c) I think I did 350°f (177°c)

This stuff is really worth the effort folks!

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