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A contemporary reckoning Options
Amarillide
Posted: Saturday, March 21, 2020 2:25:03 PM
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Hi, dear forum people,
I bumped into this statement:

"From this perspective, this performance is a TwentyFirst-Century Orestes: a contemporary reckoning in the same way that Hamlet is a Renaissance Orestes."

I am asking you, mother tongue, one or more synonyms for "reckoning" in this context, in order to grasp the overall meaning. I am not sure if "a contemporary reckoning" is referred to the idea of putting the 2 things aside, or if the performance and Hamlet are a contemporary reckoning of Orestes. And also if I think it is more the latter, I still have some problems in finding a synonym, I mean, the precise meaning of the word in this phrase... what I find in vocabularies does not fit that much...

Looking forward to receiving your suggestions,
Ama
thar
Posted: Saturday, March 21, 2020 2:55:07 PM

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Reckoning is thinking, having an opinion, or judging something, making decisions.
(It is also adding up and estimating. And judging where you are.)

It is not a reworking - it is not identifiably the same story. But it has similar ideas and themes.

it is a rethinking of that story, new view of it in each new situation. That is not exactly what reckoning means, and I am not putting it as well as I would like, but that is what I take 'reckoning' to mean here.

Ancient Greek myth had the character Orestes, who kills his father's murderer.

In Shakespeare's time (English Renaissance) you have the character and the play Hamlet. The author here is making that link - he is saying you could call that play "Orestes: a Renaissance reckoning."

Now, in the twenty-first century (contemporary) we have this character/play, which he is calling "Orestes: a contemporary reckoning"


But it is unusual usage of the word.


Amarillide
Posted: Saturday, March 21, 2020 3:32:43 PM
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I am still chewing and rechewing...

Yes, none of the "official" meanings fitted.
Rethinking sounds closer to what I think it may mean. But still, I feel like not totally at rest, I mean, I keep rethinking it like an issue that's not completely resolved.

How about viewpoint...could it be possible to put viewpoint (or something similar) among the "unusual but still possible" meanings of reckoning?

Ama
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, March 21, 2020 6:06:55 PM

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Amarillide wrote:
I am still chewing and rechewing...

Yes, none of the "official" meanings fitted.
Rethinking sounds closer to what I think it may mean. But still, I feel like not totally at rest, I mean, I keep rethinking it like an issue that's not completely resolved.

How about viewpoint...could it be possible to put viewpoint (or something similar) among the "unusual but still possible" meanings of reckoning?

Ama


I think that viewpoint, or simply, view, works just fine.
Amarillide
Posted: Sunday, March 22, 2020 5:27:37 AM
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Joined: 2/13/2020
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Ok, thank you FounDit and Thar,
I couldn't have the confidence to get out the official meanings range on my own!
Cheers,
Ama
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, March 23, 2020 6:32:53 AM

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There IS one definition which can more easily be 'stretched' to fit.

It is normally only used in phrases/literary texts. "A day of reckoning", "A reckoning will come" . . .

reckoning n
4. retribution for one's actions (esp in the phrase day of reckoning)

Collins English Dictionary

Aegisthus and Clytemnestra met their reckoning when Orestes came back. In the same way, Claudius meets his day of reckoning in Hamlet.

POSSIBLY it's this one.

The sentence is not quite right to my mind (if that is the meaning the writer meant to use) but it's not too far wrong.

"From this perspective, this performance is a TwentyFirst-Century Orestes: a contemporary reckoning in the same way that Hamlet is a Renaissance Orestes."

"From this perspective, this performance is a TwentyFirst-Century Orestes: a contemporary story of retribution in the same way that Hamlet is a Renaissance Orestes."
Amarillide
Posted: Monday, March 23, 2020 7:24:24 AM
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Joined: 2/13/2020
Posts: 76
Neurons: 544
Drag0nspeaker wrote:

reckoning n
4. retribution for one's actions (esp in the phrase day of reckoning)

Collins English Dictionary

Aegisthus and Clytemnestra met their reckoning when Orestes came back. In the same way, Claudius meets his day of reckoning in Hamlet.

POSSIBLY it's this one.



B I N G O!
Dancing Dancing Dancing

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, March 23, 2020 7:56:04 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 33,914
Neurons: 219,510
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
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