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A certain use of the -ing form Options
Amarillide
Posted: Friday, March 20, 2020 4:18:44 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 2/13/2020
Posts: 79
Neurons: 561
Hi, everyone!
Here I am with the silliest question ever... but when indecision takes over, I may end up being paralyzed in front of the most obvious things.

Ok, here is the phrase:

"My project has always been about charm rather than beauty: the two having become separated from each other in the late works of the artist. 

I am a bit doubtful about the phrase after the two points... could it be expressed, in other words, by: "because the two of them became separated from each other in the late works of the artist"?

Does it express a cause or there is something else that I may be missing?

Thank you in advance for bearing with me...

Ama
Audiendus
Posted: Saturday, March 21, 2020 1:58:37 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 6,429
Neurons: 1,217,704
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
Amarillide wrote:
"My project has always been about charm rather than beauty: the two having become separated from each other in the late works of the artist.

"The two having become..." is correct. It explains the contrast in "charm rather than beauty". In grammatical terms, it is an 'absolute phrase'. To say "because the two of them became separated" would not be so good, as it would appear to answer the question "why have you specifically chosen charm?" when the actual implied question is "why have you contrasted charm with beauty?" "The two having become..." answers the latter question.

As the part of the sentence after "beauty" is not a finite clause (it has no finite verb), it may be better to change the colon to a dash, or leave out the colon and put everything after "beauty" in parentheses.
Amarillide
Posted: Saturday, March 21, 2020 2:46:02 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 2/13/2020
Posts: 79
Neurons: 561
Audiendus wrote:

As the part of the sentence after "beauty" is not a finite clause (it has no finite verb), it may be better to change the colon to a dash, or leave out the colon and put everything after "beauty" in parentheses.


This sounds like the perfect solution to leave the flavor of such a statement, a flavor that — now I know Dancing — was given from dealing with a non-finite verb on its own!

Every day I see how useful is to give a name to a specific grammatical situation instead of just following my instinct and experience of the language in use. I wonder if there is any specific grammar book that you would recommend to start and study a bit of grammatic/syntax in a more systematic way, like following a path that would slowly fill up my deficiencies.

Thank you very much for your help,
Ama

Audiendus
Posted: Saturday, March 21, 2020 2:59:47 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 6,429
Neurons: 1,217,704
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
Amarillide wrote:
Every day I see how useful is to give a name to a specific grammatical situation instead of just following my instinct and experience of the language in use. I wonder if there is any specific grammar book that you would recommend to start and study a bit of grammatic/syntax in a more systematic way, like following a path that would slowly fill up my deficiencies.

The Farlex Grammar Book (used in the TFD Daily Grammar Lessons) may be a good place to start.
Amarillide
Posted: Saturday, March 21, 2020 3:16:57 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 2/13/2020
Posts: 79
Neurons: 561
Thank you very much!
I'll check it out!
Ama
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