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nightdream
Posted: Sunday, March 15, 2020 2:03:51 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/20/2015
Posts: 1,467
Neurons: 4,344
Would it be correct if I write:

"Now it became clear for me"?

Or should I write:

"Now it has become clear for me"?
sureshot
Posted: Sunday, March 15, 2020 2:51:24 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2015
Posts: 2,741
Neurons: 451,004
nightdream wrote:
Would it be correct if I write:

"Now it became clear for me"?

Or should I write:

"Now it has become clear for me"?

_________________

Use your second sentence. "Now" connects the state with the present time.
nightdream
Posted: Sunday, March 15, 2020 3:17:23 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/20/2015
Posts: 1,467
Neurons: 4,344
sureshot wrote:
nightdream wrote:
Would it be correct if I write:

"Now it became clear for me"?

Or should I write:

"Now it has become clear for me"?

_________________

Use your second sentence. "Now" connects the state with the present time.



Would it be exactly wrong if one uses the first?

tautophile
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2020 12:10:18 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/14/2018
Posts: 828
Neurons: 13,866
No, it wouldn't be "wrong" (in my opinion) if you use your first option. i.e., "Now it became clear to me."

"Now it became clear to me" means that something ("it", whatever "it" is) that had not been clear to you before, has became clear to you at the time you're referring to, which may not be the actual present time.

"Now it has become clear to me" means that, at some time in the past, "it" was not clear to me, but it has since (at some unspecified time, also in the past) become clear.
BobShilling
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2020 6:43:43 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/1/2018
Posts: 1,449
Neurons: 7,891
Location: Beroun, Stredocesky, Czech Republic
nightdream wrote:
Would it be exactly wrong if one uses the first?



Now it became clear to me is so unlikely that I think it would be reasonable to consider it incorrect. 'Now' refers to the present time; the past tense (generally) refers to past time.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2020 7:27:59 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,213
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
"Now, it became clear to me" sounds like a literary 'tool' - like using the present tense for telling about a past action in storytelling.

I spent weeks pondering what it was that was making me feel uncomfortable.
On that fateful Saturday evening, my five-year-old daughter asked "Why is the sky blue?" and suddenly . . . Now, it became clear to me. I had spent so long underground that the sky itself felt oppressive to me.


To me, it doesn't sound right in normal grammatical English - but it makes sense in that story.

***************
I've heard it in normal life, particularly when used concerning sudden realisations or memories.
"Now" does have a meaning "then", and is used with a past tense, strangely enough. However, most dictionaries specify a literary use.

now - adv
4. At this point in the series of events; then: The ship was now listing to port.
American Heritage
3. at the time being referred to: The case was now ready for the jury. Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary,
Adv 1.now - in the historical present; at this point in the narration of a series of past events; "President Kennedy now calls in the National Guard"; "Washington now decides to cross the Delaware" Farlex Wordnet
used in stories or reports of past events to describe a new situation or event: It was getting dark now, and we were tired. Cambridge Dictionary
1.5(in a narrative or account of past events) at the time spoken of or referred to.
she was nineteen now, and she was alone
‘Up until then Callum had just been sitting quietly watching the bookworm, but now he spoke up.’
‘Saria has lied about things relating to him in the past and now Miriam and Paul both lied to get Paul in the frame.’
‘I frowned at my brother as he clutched his suitcase to his chest and walked past me, now not daring to look at me.’
Oxford English Dictionary
WeaselADAPT
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2020 8:08:25 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/6/2014
Posts: 330
Neurons: 61,189
Location: Kentwood, Michigan, United States
nightdream wrote:
Would it be correct if I write:

"Now it became clear for me"?

Or should I write:

"Now it has become clear for me"?


Hey, Nightie.

I suggest that your first option is incorrect, at least in normal usage.

Dragon's suggestion that it could pass as a literary device seems agreeable, however. In this usage, I would note that you should probably add a comma after Now.

Coincidentally, I actually take more issue with your uses of "for" in the two sentences. This sounds much more natural to me:

"Now it has become clear to me."

the Weasel
WeaselWorks Freelance Editing
Audiendus
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2020 10:30:04 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 6,580
Neurons: 1,243,109
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
WeaselADAPT wrote:
nightdream wrote:
Would it be correct if I write:

"Now it became clear for me"?

Or should I write:

"Now it has become clear for me"?

Hey, Nightie.

I suggest that your first option is incorrect, at least in normal usage.

Dragon's suggestion that it could pass as a literary device seems agreeable, however. In this usage, I would note that you should probably add a comma after Now.


I agree with the above, except that I don't think a comma would be necessary in such a case.
nightdream
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2020 1:33:55 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/20/2015
Posts: 1,467
Neurons: 4,344
It turned out I had used a wrong preposition: it should be "to" and not "for", "became clear to me".
nightdream
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2020 5:02:20 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/20/2015
Posts: 1,467
Neurons: 4,344
I often confuse the use of "to" and "for".

Which of them should one use in the following cases:

"It is a real discovery to/for me"?

And why should one use "to" instead of "for" in the case of

"Now it has become clear to me"?
WeaselADAPT
Posted: Tuesday, March 31, 2020 4:33:27 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/6/2014
Posts: 330
Neurons: 61,189
Location: Kentwood, Michigan, United States
nightdream wrote:
I often confuse the use of "to" and "for".

Which of them should one use in the following cases:

"It is a real discovery to/for me"?

And why should one use "to" instead of "for" in the case of

"Now it has become clear to me"?


Hey, Nightie.

I think it should be: "It is a real discovery for me." I cannot think of any way to see the sentence where using to works, but the English language is often flexible, so there may be some angle that's not occurring to me. It is difficult (for me) to explain the why of it – the reason:

It is a real discovery for me.
It is a big deal to me.

With regard to your other question, I think the best I can do for you is to share a couple of links where others provide some advice on the matter:

https://www.espressoenglish.net/difference-between-to-and-for/
https://www.eslbuzz.com/the-difference-between-to-and-for-in-english/

Good luck!

the Weasel
WeaselWorks Freelance Editing
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