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comestible Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 12:00:00 AM
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comestible

(noun) Any substance that can be used as food.

Synonyms: eatable, edible, pabulum, victual

Usage: The kitchen table was laden with meats, cheeses, and countless other delectable comestibles.
KSPavan
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 1:29:07 AM

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Word of the Day
?
comestible
Definition: (noun) Any substance that can be used as food.
Synonyms: eatable, edible, pabulum, victual
Usage: The kitchen table was laden with meats, cheeses, and countless other delectable comestibles.
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 5:39:12 AM

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Did You Know?
Adjective:

Did you expect comestible to be a noun meaning "food"? You're probably not alone. As it happens, comestible is used both as an adjective and a noun. The adjective is by far the older of the two; it has been part of English since at least the 1400s. (In fact, one of its earliest known uses was in a text printed in 1483 by William Caxton, the man who established England's first printing press.) The noun (which is most often used in the plural form, comestibles) dates only from 1837. It made its first appearance in a novel in which a character fortified himself with "a strong reinforcement of comestibles."

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/comestible
taurine
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 5:59:45 AM

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As Darling's ship sailed through the heads in October 1831 while 4000 revellers at W.C. Wentworth's Vaucluse House "refreshed by copious potations of Wright's strong beer and 'helewated by the fumes of Cooper's gin', did justice to their kind hosts' tables loaded with comestibles, roast beef, and mutton" it was possible to conclude that at least one group of British subjects had succeeded in carving out for themselves ... "a distinct discursive space, one of rational judgment and enlightened critique.

- Edgeworth, Brendan, "Defamation Law and the Emergence of a Critical Press in Colonial New South Wales (1824-1831)" [1990] 6 Australian Journal of Law and Society 50, p.81
thar
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 6:59:59 AM

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Look who is being all posh!

Latin > comestibles

Borrowed from Middle French comestible, or its source, Medieval Latin comestibilis, from Latin comedō (“I eat”), from com- (English com-) + edō (“I eat”) (as in English edible), from Proto-Indo-European (whence also English eat). Cognate with Spanish comestible (“grocery”).



Anglo-Saxon > food

Old English fōda
From Proto-Germanic *fōdô, from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂-. Cognate with Old Norse fœða (Danish føde, Swedish föda, Icelandic fæða).


Whistle

Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 8:19:57 AM

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Definition: (noun) Any substance that can be used as food.
Synonyms: eatable, edible, pabulum, victual
Usage: The kitchen table was laden with meats, cheeses, and countless other delectable comestibles.
Fneto
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 10:04:18 AM

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comestible
Definition: (noun) Any substance that can be used as food.
Synonyms: eatable, edible, pabulum, victual
Usage: The kitchen table was laden with meats, cheeses, and countless other delectable comestibles.
Emel Rapchan
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 11:30:31 AM

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Emel Rapchan
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 11:30:52 AM

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coag
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 12:22:45 PM

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thar wrote:
Look who is being all posh!

Latin > comestibles

Borrowed from Middle French comestible, or its source, Medieval Latin comestibilis, from Latin comedō (“I eat”), from com- (English com-) + edō (“I eat”) (as in English edible), from Proto-Indo-European (whence also English eat). Cognate with Spanish comestible (“grocery”).



Anglo-Saxon > food

Old English fōda
From Proto-Germanic *fōdô, from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂-. Cognate with Old Norse fœða (Danish føde, Swedish föda, Icelandic fæða).


Whistle


aliment (n.)
"food, nutriment," late 15c., from Latin alimentum "nourishment," in plural, "food, provisions," from alere "to suckle, nourish," from PIE root *al- (2) "to grow, nourish." Related: Alimental.

nutriment (n.)
"food, drink, sustenance," early 15c., from Latin nutrimentum "nourishment; support," from nutrire "to nourish, suckle, feed," from PIE *nu-tri-, suffixed form (with feminine agent suffix) of *(s)nau- "to swim, flow, let flow," hence "to suckle," extended form of root *sna- "to swim."

sustenance (n.)
c. 1300, "means of living, subsistence, livelihood," from Old French sostenance "support, aid" (Modern French soutenance), from Late Latin sustinentia "endurance," from present participle stem of Latin sustinere
"hold up, hold upright; furnish with means of support; bear, undergo, endure," from assimilated form of sub "up from below" (see sub-) + tenere "to hold," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch."


Michelangelo
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 1:13:28 PM

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Buon pranzo a tutti
lazarius
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 2:14:31 PM

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Daemon wrote:
comestible

(noun) Any substance that can be used as food.

Synonyms: pabulum

Pabulum is a very technical word - it has ever been used to mean substances taken directly into cells or into plants. Here is a regular example of usage:

https://books.google.com/books?id=4nZGAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA43&dq=pabulum

Quote:
The mouths, or lacteals, being situate, and opening in the convex superficies of roots, they take their pabulum, being fine particles of earth, from the superficies of the pores, or cavities, wherein the roots are included.

And it is certain, that the earth is not divested or robbed of this pabulum, by any other means than by actual fire, or the roots of plants.

It is not synonymous to the word comestible, which has ever been used to mean food for human beings.

-
coag
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 3:42:25 PM

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Michelangelo wrote:
Buon pranzo a tutti

Hello Michelangelo, (I cannot believe I'm writing a message to Michelangelo Whistle )

I had to use the Internet to translate your sentence. It's "Good lunch to all".
Coincidentally, I saw another "tutti" sentence yesterday: "Tutti in casa"=Everyone in the house.
I hope that the coronavirus situation will improve and resolve quickly.

thar
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 4:38:22 PM

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coag wrote:

aliment (n.)
"food, nutriment," late 15c., from Latin alimentum "nourishment," in plural, "food, provisions," from alere "to suckle, nourish," from PIE root *al- (2) "to grow, nourish." Related: Alimental.

nutriment (n.)
"food, drink, sustenance," early 15c., from Latin nutrimentum "nourishment; support," from nutrire "to nourish, suckle, feed," from PIE *nu-tri-, suffixed form (with feminine agent suffix) of *(s)nau- "to swim, flow, let flow," hence "to suckle," extended form of root *sna- "to swim."

sustenance (n.)
c. 1300, "means of living, subsistence, livelihood," from Old French sostenance "support, aid" (Modern French soutenance), from Late Latin sustinentia "endurance," from present participle stem of Latin sustinere
"hold up, hold upright; furnish with means of support; bear, undergo, endure," from assimilated form of sub "up from below" (see sub-) + tenere "to hold," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch."




And another one for you.
Vittles (victuals in the OP but colloquially vittles)

Quote:
English Edit
Alternative forms Edit
victuall (obsolete)
Etymology Edit
From Middle English vitaile, vitaylle, from Anglo-Norman and Old French vitaille, from Late Latin victualia (“provisions”), from victus (“nourishment”), from vīvō (“live, survive”).

Noun
victual (plural victuals)

(archaic) Food fit for human consumption.
(archaic, in the plural) Food supplies; provisions.
(Scotland) Grain of any kind.



You can tell the Anglo-Saxon words from the Norman French ones by looking at some Icelandic ones.
Food: matur, fæði, æti. For animals: fóður.
In English they have tended to specialise - meat, food, "eats", fodder.

Grub, nosh, chow.
Why use four syllables when you can use one? Whistle



lazarius
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 9:01:39 PM

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Location: Kotel’niki, Moskovskaya, Russia
thar wrote:
Grub, nosh, chow.

Grub was in the first book I tried to read in English:

https://books.google.com/books?id=T11ODwAAQBAJ&pg=PT7&dq=grub

Quote:
"They know where their hides is safe," he said. "They'd sooner eat grub than be grub. They're pretty wise, them dogs"

That's the third page, about as far as I could get before giving up. I have never read it through.

Nosh I learned quite recently on Vocabulary.Com:

https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/nosh



They say it is Yiddish. I have never seen chow.

thar wrote:
Why use four syllables when you can use one?

Because there are contexts where they fit better:

https://books.google.com/books?id=_tpHYE9Z1PoC&pg=PA642&dq=comestibles

Quote:
Rents would go down. Parties wouldn’t be given any more. All the tradesmen of the town would be bankrupt. Wine, wax-lights, comestibles, rouge, crinoline petticoats, diamonds, wigs, Louis Quatorze gimcracks, and old china, park hacks and splendid high-stepping carriage horses — all the delights of life, I say, — would go to the deuce, if people did but act upon their silly principles, and avoid those whom they dislike and abuse.

-

coag
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 10:34:00 PM

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Joined: 3/27/2010
Posts: 1,412
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Thanks thar and lazarius. Victuals, vittels, pabulum, grub, nosh, chow, and nibble are new words for me.

I thought "chow" might be related to the famous New England clam chowder, but no, "chow" is from Chinese and "chowder" is from Latin calidus "warm, hot" (from PIE root *kele- (1) "warm").


"Nosh" is from Yiddish nashn "nibble," from Middle High German naschen, from Old High German hnascon, nascon "to nibble," from Proto-Germanic *(g)naskon.

I've seen "niblets" on cans of kernel corn but I never bothered checking what it meant. It's a trademark derived from "nibble".
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