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Give (way) Options
Ivan Fadeev
Posted: Monday, March 9, 2020 1:58:01 PM

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Joined: 2/21/2015
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Is any of them correct?

Give me way!
Give me the way!
Give me a way!

(to mean - get out of my way)
thar
Posted: Monday, March 9, 2020 3:36:21 PM

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None,unless you are in a car.

This is not 'a way' as in a path through.

If you want people to let you through you ask them to let you through.

At a junction, "Give Way" instructs a driver to let the cars on the other road have priority - it is that driver who has to wait for a gap in traffic before pulling out. But you don't use it for people moving around.

Quote:
give way

C1 UK
(US yield)
to allow other vehicles to go past before you move onto a road:
You have to give way to traffic coming from the right.
tautophile
Posted: Monday, March 9, 2020 3:47:55 PM
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Your three examples ("Give me way!", "Give me the way!", "Give me a way!") are all grammatically correct, but none of them are phrases a native speaker would normally use.

To order someone to get out of your way, you could say "Give way!" However, you would most likely simply say "Get out of my [or the] way!". You might want to say "Let me through". These sentences might be understood (by the person spoken to) as rude or discourteous, but putting "please" before or after any of them would make them much less so, because the "please" means you're making a request, not making a demand.

Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Monday, March 9, 2020 6:25:25 PM

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I would like to add, that even if the 3 sample sentences are grammatically correct, this native English speaker would have no idea what you wanted, if you used any of them. LOL!
Ivan Fadeev
Posted: Tuesday, March 10, 2020 12:05:16 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/21/2015
Posts: 610
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Wilmar (USA) 1M wrote:
I would like to add, that even if the 3 sample sentences are grammatically correct, this native English speaker would have no idea what you wanted, if you used any of them. LOL!



Poor thing! If I were around I would give you some free English lessons so that you know your first language better.
Islami
Posted: Tuesday, March 10, 2020 12:35:12 AM
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Romany
Posted: Tuesday, March 10, 2020 9:08:55 AM
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Ivan -

to be fair - Wilmar is an elderly gentleman and probably not too familiar with text-speak. I really don't think he meant to laugh at a learner for their attempts. He probably thought LOL was a way of being jolly or showing he was only joking?

The other night I heard someone saying their grandmother thought LOL meant "Lots of love" - so she would, for example, send a message such as "Dear old Fido the Dog died last night LOL" !!
Tara2
Posted: Tuesday, March 10, 2020 9:18:03 AM

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Romany wrote:
Ivan -

The other night I heard someone saying their grandmother thought LOL meant "Lots of love" - so she would, for example, send a message such as "Dear old Fido the Dog died last night LOL" !!

LoL Angel Angel Angel Whistle Applause Applause
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