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trickymania
Posted: Sunday, October 16, 2011 7:42:07 AM
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Can anybody tell me how to pronounce and use the word "tete-a-tete" by giving usage example?
Briton
Posted: Sunday, October 16, 2011 8:12:08 AM
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It is a French expression and while commonly used in English, should be pronounced the French way e.g. "tett-a-tett", with a short 'a'.

It literally means head-to-head and indicates a private conversation between two people.

"He had a tete-a-tete with his girlfriend over dinner."


leonAzul
Posted: Sunday, October 16, 2011 8:21:14 AM

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trickymania wrote:
Can anybody tell me how to pronounce and use the word "tete-a-tete" by giving usage example?


The Free Dictionary defines it in this way:

Quote:
Tete`-a-tete´ (tāt`å`tāt´)
n. 1. Private conversation; familiar interview or conference of two persons.


As a loan word, from French, the pronunciation varies from the anglicized /ˈte:t ə ˈte:t/ to the more French sounding /ˈtε tɑ ˈtεt/. Both are "correct", although the latter could sound pretentious in some contexts. When using it in the context of recorded speech, this can be indicated by italicizing the original spelling: tête à tête.

"It is time we had a little tete-a-tete to discuss this further without interruptions from the others."


As with many nouns, it can also be used adverbially:

"I miss our tete-a-tete breakfasts when we would share our plans to seize the day."
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Sunday, October 16, 2011 10:55:16 AM

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It is also used in some sports, as in pétanque, for head to head or singles game.
A small sofa with two seats can also be called tête-a-tete (or loveseat, vis-a-vis).
leonAzul
Posted: Sunday, October 16, 2011 11:11:22 AM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:

A small sofa with two seats can also be called tête-a-tete (or loveseat, vis-a-vis).


Ah yes, a means to promote «cerveau à cerveau» over «ventre à ventre» Dancing
excaelis
Posted: Sunday, October 16, 2011 4:13:07 PM

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[quote=Briton]It is a French expression and while commonly used in English, should be pronounced the French way e.g. "tett-a-tett", with a short 'a'.

It literally means head-to-head and indicates a private conversation between two people.


In Liverpool or Glasgow it may be translated as stickin' a nut on. Brick wall
leonAzul
Posted: Sunday, October 16, 2011 5:14:04 PM

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excaelis wrote:
[quote=Briton]It is a French expression and while commonly used in English, should be pronounced the French way e.g. "tett-a-tett", with a short 'a'.

It literally means head-to-head and indicates a private conversation between two people.


In Liverpool or Glasgow it may be translated as stickin' a nut on. Brick wall


That might be misunderstood south of 54˚40'. Whistle
Briton
Posted: Sunday, October 16, 2011 8:26:45 PM
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As an English person living neither in Liverpool nor a foreign country such as Scotland, I have not heard of this expression and would most likely have misunderstood it also. Whistle
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, October 17, 2011 9:19:54 AM

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Briton wrote:
As an English person living neither in Liverpool nor a foreign country such as Scotland, I have not heard of this expression and would most likely have misunderstood it also.

"stickin' a nut on." Brick wall

otherwise known as a "Glasgow kiss" is the act of strongly hitting one's forehead against the bridge of the other person's nose, causing a lot of blood, a lot of pain and usually (unless the other person is a berserker) the end of the confrontation.
Briton
Posted: Monday, October 17, 2011 11:13:40 AM
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Och! Noo I have haird of a "Glasgow Kiss"! I'm just glad I have nae experienced one.

I do hope we're not confusing our non-BE-speaking friends! Think

IMcRout
Posted: Monday, October 17, 2011 12:23:13 PM
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And do them Glaswegians get scot-free after bumping their nuts into somebody else's nose?
NancyLee
Posted: Monday, October 17, 2011 1:22:27 PM
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tête-a-tete

"stickin' a nut on." Brick wall

otherwise known as a "Glasgow kiss" is the act of strongly hitting one's forehead against the bridge of the other person's nose, causing a lot of blood, a lot of pain and usually (unless the other person is a berserker) the end of the confrontation.


Kinda sorta doesn't seem an exact definition...Shame on you

Funny though!Applause

leonAzul
Posted: Monday, October 17, 2011 1:33:29 PM

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IMcRout wrote:
And do them Glaswegians get scot-free after bumping their nuts into somebody else's nose?


Must be the whisky or something; most tea-baggers I hear about aim for the mouth. Anxious
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, October 17, 2011 2:08:09 PM

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Ah well - if you get the angle wrong while aiming for the mouth, his teeth can do a lot of damage to your forehead. d'oh!

I don't know about "scot-free" - you might end up having a tête-à-tête with the pōliss (Scottish pronunciation of police) Shame on you
NancyLee
Posted: Monday, October 17, 2011 2:53:22 PM
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Ah well - if you get the angle wrong while aiming for the mouth, his teeth can do a lot of damage to your forehead. d'oh!

I don't know about "scot-free" - you might end up having a tête-à-tête with the pōliss (Scottish pronunciation of police) Shame on you


"scot-free" - great usage! timing and reference great! Applause Applause Applause


excaelis
Posted: Monday, October 17, 2011 5:07:47 PM

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Briton wrote:
As an English person living neither in Liverpool nor a foreign country such as Scotland, I have not heard of this expression and would most likely have misunderstood it also. Whistle


Briton, my friend, I'm concerned that this response of yours may give the impression to the unwary visitor that Liverpool is not a foreign country.
Briton
Posted: Monday, October 17, 2011 6:38:23 PM
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That was not my intent, excaelis, my chum, as everyone I know looks upon Liverpool with horrible fascination, not understanding a word that is said there. It must be a foreign place indeed.

On the other hand, it may be that the indecipherability of the speech is the result of consuming that strange dish, "Scouse".

................

Also, I got so intent on achieving a mock Scottish accent in my last post that I made some basic errors in grammar.

Thank you for for being gracious and not pointing these out.

What was the question again?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, October 18, 2011 4:25:06 PM

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Briton asked:
What was the question again?

The original question about tete-a-tete was well answered some time ago by leonAzul. (thank you)

As you say, Liverpuddle is a fascinating place - it was even disowned by Lancashire and now exists in its own little bit of territory.

Scouse is not actually from Liverpool, but was stolen from the Norwegian and German sailors who landed there...

Scouse is a type of lamb or beef stew. The word comes from lobscouse (originally lob's course) or lapskaus, Norwegian for "stew" and refers to a meat based stew commonly eaten by sailors throughout Northern Europe, which became popular in seaports such as Liverpool.
...
The name of the North German hash Labskaus is derived from "Lapskaus" the Norwegian for stew. Labskaus is traditional in the Lower Elbe region, especially in the port city Hamburg.
Wikipedia
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, October 18, 2011 5:38:44 PM

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Funnily Rauma, Finland, is like Liverpool. Rauma dialect is somewhat from other planet and lapskoussi is Raumlaine traditional food ;-)
Briton
Posted: Tuesday, October 18, 2011 7:31:22 PM
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:


Scouse is not actually from Liverpool, but was stolen from the Norwegian and German sailors who landed there...

Scouse is a type of lamb or beef stew. The word comes from lobscouse (originally lob's course) or lapskaus, Norwegian for "stew" and refers to a meat based stew commonly eaten by sailors throughout Northern Europe, which became popular in seaports such as Liverpool.
...
The name of the North German hash Labskaus is derived from "Lapskaus" the Norwegian for stew. Labskaus is traditional in the Lower Elbe region, especially in the port city Hamburg.
Wikipedia


It's still strange, still eaten by Liverpuddlians and is still the probable cause of many of their problems. Topped only by haggis and cockaleekie. Whistle
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, October 18, 2011 7:36:14 PM

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The Norwegian Lapskaus seems to be quite the same Finnish Army serves with the name Battalion Stew.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 4:56:47 AM

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Briton wrote:
Topped only by haggis and cockaleekie.

That's fightin' talk the noo! Shame on you

Strangely enough - I've not noticed any Scots on this forum, possibly they don't want to be associated with an English Language Forum. Whistle

Briton
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 10:02:05 AM
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:


Strangely enough - I've not noticed any Scots on this forum, possibly they don't want to be associated with an English Language Forum. Whistle


If I, as a native English person, can refer to myself as a Briton who speaks 'British' English, the least a Scot can do is admit to it also.

Are they hiding do you think?

And what is British English? It's just the mother language that no-one else, including a lot of British people, can speak properly!

Humph!

I'm now off dahn the caff for a bit of scran and a cuppa.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 10:25:22 AM

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[image not available]
Discombobulated is a Scot.
Briton
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 12:32:11 PM
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Ah! An educated Scot with no need to hide, obviously. Applause

(Please note, nice Scottish people, I am only kidding so no "kisses", please.)
Discombobulated
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 5:30:59 PM
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I've half a mind to don the old kilt and Glasgow kiss the lot of you (except you JJ)

Only joking. I'm a peaceful Scot who used to linger around TFD before being distracted by other English related sites and such. Perhaps I should show my presence more often in defence for my fellow men and women.

Alas, I am proud to be a Scot but I do love the English language. England isn't half bad either although I do prefer curvaceous countries (no offence - the lake district provide me with enough sweetness for forgiveness). And, I am a qualified English language teacher. Have I provided enough for my defence?

Kisses all round (the non Glasgow kind)
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 5:47:57 PM

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Ah - Briton - you didn't mention the deep fried Mars Bar:


[image not available]

and Jyrkka Jatka said nothing of Kalakukko.

But since we have completely switched this topic from "tete-a-tete" to food, perhaps we should go back to the earlier topic:
http://forum.thefreedictionary.com/postst11451_Why-don-t-Fish-Chip-shops-sell-fish-fingers-.aspx
Whistle Whistle I'll shut up now Not talking
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 6:18:15 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:

and Jyrkka Jatka said nothing of Kalakukko.

But since we have completely switched this topic from "tete-a-tete" to food, perhaps we should go back to the earlier topic:
http://forum.thefreedictionary.com/postst11451_Why-don-t-Fish-Chip-shops-sell-fish-fingers-.aspx
Whistle Whistle I'll shut up now Not talking


That topic was some serious fun, really ;-)

And we Finns still use our Ä's like in Jyrkkä Jätkä. Jatka means "continue", Jätkä means "Jack", "Dude"...
Whistle
leonAzul
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 7:26:55 PM

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Back on topic, imagine this romantic tête-à-tête, complete with une tête de veau:





[image not available]





Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 7:37:51 PM

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What were you thinking, this is tete-a-tete:



[image not available]

Peaceward
Posted: Thursday, October 20, 2011 1:19:15 AM
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In Russian variant the expression is linked with talking only
Briton
Posted: Thursday, October 20, 2011 11:13:56 AM
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Discombobulated, we would welcome you back gladly.

I too am peaceful, so if you will forgive my cheap and unwarranted anti-Scottish jokes (and split-infinitives), I will forgive an English teacher writing, "in defence for".

A momentary lapse, I'm sure.Whistle

Discombobulated
Posted: Thursday, October 20, 2011 11:22:05 AM
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Or a deliberate error? You decide. :P
Briton
Posted: Thursday, October 20, 2011 11:30:06 AM
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Discombobulated wrote:
Or a deliberate error? You decide. :P



X^D
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