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Question about some sentences in Pride and Prejudice Options
yummyspringroll
Posted: Sunday, February 16, 2020 10:44:55 PM

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Joined: 9/25/2016
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Please help me understand these sentences from Pride and Prejudice


Darcy's letter:

Quote:
That I was desirous of believing her indifferent is certain—but I will venture to say that my investigation and decisions are not usually influenced by my hopes or fears. I did not believe her to be indifferent because I wished it; I believed it on impartial conviction, as truly as I wished it in reason.


So Darcy wishes Jane to be indifferent, and he also believes that she is, based on his unbiased observation. Am I correct? Now, what does the last part mean (as truly as I wished it in reason)?

Darcy's letter:

Quote:
Here again shall give you pain—to what degree you only can tell. But whatever may be the sentiments which Mr. Wickham has created, a suspicion of their nature shall not prevent me from unfolding his real character—it adds even another motive.


Does this mean Darcy suspects Wickham has made Elizabeth in love with him, and therefore exposing Wichkam will pain Elizabeth?

Chapter 36:

Quote:
If Elizabeth, when Mr. Darcy gave her the letter, did not expect it to contain a renewal of his offers, she had formed no expectation at all of its contents. But such as they were, it may well be supposed how eagerly she went through them, and what a contrariety of emotion they excited.


Does this means that Elizabeth expects the letter to contain none other than a renewal of Darcy's proposal? And therefore she eagerly goes through the letter to find this renewal, which would prove her expectation right?

Thank you Angel
baosen
Posted: Sunday, February 16, 2020 11:48:50 PM
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Joined: 2/16/2020
Posts: 1
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1. Darcy was desirous that Jane was indifferent, but he did not wish that she is.
I am from china,try to explain the question,but my grammar is awful.
FounDit
Posted: Monday, February 17, 2020 11:44:15 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 13,890
Neurons: 66,326
yummyspringroll wrote:
Please help me understand these sentences from Pride and Prejudice

I've never read Pride and Prejudice. It's not my type of reading material, but I'll tell you how I read these excerpts.

Darcy's letter:

Quote:
That I was desirous of believing her indifferent is certain—but I will venture to say that my investigation and decisions are not usually influenced by my hopes or fears. I did not believe her to be indifferent because I wished it; I believed it on impartial conviction, as truly as I wished it in reason.


So Darcy wishes Jane to be indifferent, and he also believes that she is, based on his unbiased observation. Am I correct? Now, what does the last part mean (as truly as I wished it in reason)?
Darcy operates on reason rather than the emotions of hope, or fear. Because of this he reasons that she will be indifferent, and that proves to be true, not because he wished it, but impartial conviction verified what he wished for with his reason.

Darcy's letter:

Quote:
Here again shall give you pain—to what degree you only can tell. But whatever may be the sentiments which Mr. Wickham has created, a suspicion of their nature shall not prevent me from unfolding his real character—it adds even another motive.


Does this mean Darcy suspects Wickham has made Elizabeth in love with him, and therefore exposing Wichkam will pain Elizabeth?
I can't answer that question, but can say only this:
Darcy is saying that by describing Mr. wickham's true character, it will add another motive to the feelings he may have generated in her, and that may cause her pain.

Chapter 36:

Quote:
If Elizabeth, when Mr. Darcy gave her the letter, did not expect it to contain a renewal of his offers, she had formed no expectation at all of its contents. But such as they were, it may well be supposed how eagerly she went through them, and what a contrariety of emotion they excited.


Does this means that Elizabeth expects the letter to contain none other than a renewal of Darcy's proposal? And therefore she eagerly goes through the letter to find this renewal, which would prove her expectation right?
We are told Elizabeth had formed no expectations of the letter if it contained anything beyond a renewal of the proposal. However, if she did have any, she would still be eager to read the letter and experience whatever emotions it might engender.

Thank you Angel
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