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Spring has come. / Spring is here. Options
Reiko07
Posted: Saturday, February 15, 2020 10:59:58 PM

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(1) Spring has come.

(2) Spring is here.

Which is natural in ordinary conversation?
tautophile
Posted: Sunday, February 16, 2020 1:29:43 AM
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We're still in the middle of winter here in mid February.... But...both (1) and (2) are natural in conversation. I would probably say "spring is here (at last)" when temperatures start to warm and trees, grass, etc., start to put forth leaves and flowers. I would probably saysay "spring has come" in the third week of March when the Spring equinox takes place, even if it's still chilly and the trees are still bare here in the Midwest.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Sunday, February 16, 2020 1:57:03 AM

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I might also say “Spring has sprung” because it’s a set phrase made famous in poetry and song.
Old Blue Eyes, Frank Sinatra has well known song “Feel so Young”.
“ You make me feel so young
You make me feel as spring has sprung
And every time I see you grin
I'm such a happy individual
The moment that you speak
I wanna go play hide and seek”.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZNIKZdoehE
nooshin65
Posted: Sunday, February 16, 2020 2:23:56 AM

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both sound ok... even you can say, "spring arrived!" :)
Reiko07
Posted: Sunday, February 16, 2020 6:22:02 AM

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Thank you all.

Romany
Posted: Sunday, February 16, 2020 7:51:32 AM
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Once you know the vocabulary and the grammatical way to express something there's no phrases to learn in how YOU wish to speak.

Yes, you can say either of the two sentences - they're both grammatical and the vocabulary is correct. But each person can express this in whatever way comes into their head, or with excitement, or with sadness, or with jubilation ("Yayyy. It's Spring at last!")

"I just saw my first crocus of the year. It must be Spring!
"It's Spring!"
Pointing out a tree in bud "Look! Spring's arrived!"

There's no set phrases which you ALWAYS say. Besides which, there's no "wrong" way to say a particular season has started. "Spring's here!"...how could anyone not know what you meant!!Dancing

PS: When Sarried suggested the ever-popular "Spring has sprung" sentence, I thought he might have also presented the silly poem my father (and most of his generation) used with which to greet Spring: -

"Oh Spring had sprung,
The grass is riz,
I wonder where the birdies is?
The bird is on the wing, they say,
But that's absurd,
because I've heard,
The wing is on the bird!!"

("riz" is a deliberate messing up of the verb "to rise" i.e. the grass has risen."
Reiko07
Posted: Sunday, February 16, 2020 1:48:47 PM

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Thanks, Romany.

Does "Spring has sprung" mean "Spring has come suddenly"?


Romany
Posted: Sunday, February 16, 2020 3:13:24 PM
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Yep.

It's a deliberate mistake - as are "grass is riz" "birdies is". I think that's one of the reasons it delighted us as kids: ooo-er! The grown-ups who were saying it were using bad grammar! Enough to make any kid giggle: Daddy's wrong! It's not me, for a change!!
Reiko07
Posted: Sunday, February 16, 2020 4:55:14 PM

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Thanks, Romany.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 5:27:36 AM

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Romany wrote:
"Oh Spring had sprung,
The grass is riz,
I wonder where the birdies is?
The bird is on the wing, they say,
But that's absurd,
because I've heard,
The wing is on the bird!!"

Apparently from Brooklyn -
Spring is came,
The gass is riz.
The grass is riz,
The flowers is.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 5:44:24 AM
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Drago -

Now there's one I've never heard before. Short and sweet! I like it.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 8:09:03 AM

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Yes, Reiko, that is a great example of how English loves to play with language by using it as a child would, and pointing out its absurdities..

Eg this rhyme points out three silly things in the English language.
1 - the favourite wordplay -puns - double meanings of words.
Spring is the season and also the verb to jump. (Past participle sprung)

2 - verb irregularities.
Is /was but rise/risen. Why not 'ris'? Whistle

3 idioms. The bird is 'on the wing' - it is flying. But the wing is on the bird (attached to it).


All designed to make people smile and let grown-ups act like kids for a moment. Angel


Or you can have the more philosophical outlook

Quote:
From Pippa’s Song in “Pippa Passes” by Robert Browning (1812-1889)

The year's at the spring,

And day's at the morn;

Morning's at seven;

The hill-side's dew-pearl'd;

The lark's on the wing;

The snail's on the thorn;

God's in His heaven—

All's right with the world!


Knew the last bit, but never knew the source before.
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