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Novels so often provide an anodyne and not an antidote, glide one into torpid slumbers instead of rousing one with a burning... Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, February 14, 2020 12:00:00 AM
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Novels so often provide an anodyne and not an antidote, glide one into torpid slumbers instead of rousing one with a burning brand.

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)
KSPavan
Posted: Friday, February 14, 2020 1:09:10 AM

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Quotation of the Day
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Novels so often provide an anodyne and not an antidote, glide one into torpid slumbers instead of rousing one with a burning brand.
Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Friday, February 14, 2020 6:01:17 AM

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It all depends on the kind of novel we choose to read. There are novels which stir your imagination and make you think just as there are some which will do you nothing but send you to sleep.
Bully_rus
Posted: Friday, February 14, 2020 6:01:53 AM
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Daemon wrote:
Novels so often provide an anodyne and not an antidote, glide one into torpid slumbers instead of rousing one with a burning brand.

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)


Yeah. The human nature is weak. And more pressure can’t increase its capability but rather break it to pieces...
monamagda
Posted: Friday, February 14, 2020 6:31:37 AM

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Context from A Room of One's Own

Chapter V

If you had read the entirety of A Room of One's Own you would have learned that generally Woolf was arguing that womens' progress in writing fiction has been impeded by their gender roles in a male dominated society. The title of the collected essays comes from her argument that every woman should have "money and a room of her own to write fiction." (An opportunity, that is.) Along the way Woolf gave credit to Jane Austen, the Bronte sisters, and other women who wrote superlative fiction. She never once mentioned her own work. Her concerns were much more general. The sentence, "Novels so often provide an anodyne and not an antidote, glide one into torpid slumbers instead of rousing one with a burning brand," expresses a value judgment about which type of fiction has greater value--serious fiction or entertainment. Woolf implies that if women are to be taken seriously, and treated equally, then writing about serious subjects will advance their cause more than writing about fluff. I quote below a section of the essay from which the fragment of Woolf's sentence was plucked to give a flavor of her meaning. The whole work would have to be read to understand her argument.

"And though novels predominate, novels themselves may very well have changed from association with books of a different feather. The natural simplicity, the epic age of women’s writing, may have gone. Reading and criticism may have given her a wider range, a greater subtlety. The impulse towards autobiography may be spent. She may be beginning to use writing as an art, not as a method of selfexpression. Among these new novels one might find an answer to several such questions.
I took down one of them at random. it stood at the very end of the shelf, was called LIFE’S ADVENTURE, or some such title, by Mary Carmichael, and was published in this very month of October. it seems to be her first book, I said to myself, but one must read it as if it were the last volume in a fairly long series, continuing all those other books that I have been glancing at — Lady Winchilsea’s poems and Aphra Behn’s plays and the novels of the four great novelists. For books continue each other, in spite of our habit of judging them separately. And I must also consider her — this unknown woman — as the descendant of all those other women whose circumstances I have been glancing at and see what she inherits of their characteristics and restrictions. So, with a sigh, because novels so often provide an anodyne and not an antidote, glide one into torpid slumbers instead of rousing one with a burning brand, I settled down with a notebook and a pencil to make what I could of Mary Carmichael’s first novel, LIFE’S ADVENTURE."

Read more: http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/w/woolf/virginia/w91r/chapter5.html

Mtchell Lee
Posted: Friday, February 14, 2020 6:36:25 AM

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Well, it's a masterpiece!
mudbudda669
Posted: Friday, February 14, 2020 11:34:55 AM

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