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William and Mary Proclaimed Co-Rulers of England (1689) Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, February 13, 2020 12:00:00 AM
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William and Mary Proclaimed Co-Rulers of England (1689)

King William III and Queen Mary II were joint monarchs of England. Married in 1677, they were called to the throne by Parliament after King James II—Mary's father—fled the country during the Glorious Revolution of 1688. To end the revolution, William and Mary signed the English Bill of Rights, which barred any future Catholic succession to the throne and began a new cooperation between Parliament and monarchs, leading to greater democracy. What effect did this have on the colonies in America? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Thursday, February 13, 2020 12:46:51 AM

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William and Mary Proclaimed Co-Rulers of England (1689)
King William III and Queen Mary II were joint monarchs of England. Married in 1677, they were called to the throne by Parliament after King James II—Mary's father—fled the country during the Glorious Revolution of 1688. To end the revolution, William and Mary signed the English Bill of Rights, which barred any future Catholic succession to the throne and began a new cooperation between Parliament and monarchs, leading to greater democracy.
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Thursday, February 13, 2020 6:07:59 AM

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William III and Mary II ruled Britain jointly after deposing King James II in what is known as the Glorious Revolution of 1688. Although Mary was James's daughter, she was a devoted Protestant, as was her husband, William (Prince of Orange), and many Parliamentarians and nobles wanted Mary to be monarch instead of her Roman Catholic father. In the autumn of 1688, after being asked by Parliament to take action against King James, William arrived in England with an army to depose him. James fled the country, abdicated, and Mary was invited to take the throne. However, Mary did not want to rule alone. She felt that her husband should be crowned instead (he was also a grandchild of King Charles I). But as William wanted the crown to pass to the next legitimate heir (which was Mary) and not claim the crown by conquest, a compromise was reached: Mary and William would rule jointly.

In 1690, Mary's father made an attempt to recover the throne, but was heavily defeated at the Battle of the Boyne. James was hurt by what he saw as a betrayal by his two Protestant daughters (his younger daughter Anne also supported his deposition) and disowned them both. Mary was troubled by her estrangement from her father, but felt it was her duty to put her God, country and husband first.



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thar
Posted: Thursday, February 13, 2020 6:41:39 AM

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That sounds like a very different version of history to what I have heard.

the version I have heard:
Nothing about Mary being a 'dutiful wife'. This was all about expedient politics - the combination of a strong ruler who would be a staunch defender of England against France, and a legitimate claim to the throne from a direct heir.

William wanted to be ruler of England in order to be able to fight more effectively against Catholic France (which had already invaded the Netherlands once - "The year of disaster" - and was a constant threat to them).
But although he was the nephew of James, he had a weak claim on the throne. That was particularly important given the plots by James' supporters for him to regain the throne. After William's marriage, England and Holland had agreed an alliance to defend each other against France.
William's wife being the daughter of James was what gave William legitimacy as ruler of England, but by himself it was not quite enough. He was what the English establishment wanted - a constitutional ruler who was used to working in a system where parliament had the power (he was a 'Stadtholder' in the Dutch republic) so the danger of him becoming a problem like James was much smaller. But still, having him rule on his own, as a foreign incomer, was a risk given the still volatile situation and the plotting of the Jacobites. Having Mary there as joint ruler removed that problem, and made any plot against the joint rulers a clear case of treason against the rightful monarch.

James led an army from Ireland, backed by the French, hoping to retake the throne, but that was thwarted. Plots did increase after Mary died, and after William's death Anne took the throne.
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