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How do you say about legs when... Options
marcin.k
Posted: Monday, October 10, 2011 7:14:07 AM
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Ok. Hello.
What is the proper sentence/word to describe what happened with someone who ski, skijump etc... and
his legs suddently go to different directions?
pedro
Posted: Monday, October 10, 2011 7:21:17 AM
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fractured
Shivanand
Posted: Monday, October 10, 2011 7:23:51 AM
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His faulty jump resulted in his legs being torn apart! Spreadeagled shall we say?! Thinking!
Ben Chod
Posted: Monday, October 10, 2011 7:30:33 AM
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" My legs gave way" - may be? Something gives way implies collapse of sorts.
srirr
Posted: Monday, October 10, 2011 7:36:16 AM

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I too would say "spread eagle". It is the best word that comes to my mind.

P.S.: Ben, your name? I should keep mum. Welcome on board.
marcin.k
Posted: Monday, October 10, 2011 8:22:26 AM
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pedro wrote:
fractured

Hi. It sounds like hurt or injure.
But to understand more you can see "Bode Miller hits the gate" in Y2B
M.
leonAzul
Posted: Monday, October 10, 2011 9:01:52 AM

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marcin.k wrote:
Ok. Hello.
What is the proper sentence/word to describe what happened with someone who ski, skijump etc... and
his legs suddently go to different directions?


Epic.Fail. Whistle

"Caught up in the rupture" Drool

"The agony of de feet" -- This is a reference to a video clip of a spectacular fall that was used in a promotional video to illustrate "the agony of defeat" for an American television sports program.

Seriously, I don't recall a single expression that covers that. "Spread eagle" would describe the position in which the skier might find himself after landing, but a description of the loss of control of his legs would be left to the creativity of the person describing it.

Romany
Posted: Monday, October 10, 2011 10:22:11 AM
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I think the word you are looking for, Marcin, is 'akimbo'.

Although many people think this word applies only to the arms, it is actually applicable to the legs as well: it's just not as frequently used.

"The skier, after a perfect jump, landed with his legs akimbo and so lost the competition." is a perfectly valid way of expressing the scene you presented.
IMcRout
Posted: Monday, October 10, 2011 11:18:09 AM
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His skis ran apart and his legs followed easily.
leonAzul
Posted: Monday, October 10, 2011 11:22:13 AM

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His left ski knew not where his right ski was going.
leonAzul
Posted: Monday, October 10, 2011 11:58:35 AM

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srirr wrote:

P.S.: Ben, your name? I should keep mum.


I believe you have his screen name confused with a similarly spelt word of questionable taste. Shhh

But yes, welcome, Ben.
guitar53
Posted: Monday, October 10, 2011 12:07:53 PM

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awry - In a position that is turned or twisted toward one side
or Away from the correct course

I like that legs akimbo reference
guitar53
Posted: Monday, October 10, 2011 12:09:34 PM

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IMcRout wrote:
His skis ran apart and his legs followed easily.


Yogi Berra is always a worthy quote
RuthP
Posted: Monday, October 10, 2011 12:44:09 PM

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Romany wrote:
I think the word you are looking for, Marcin, is 'akimbo'.

Although many people think this word applies only to the arms, it is actually applicable to the legs as well: it's just not as frequently used.

"The skier, after a perfect jump, landed with his legs akimbo and so lost the competition." is a perfectly valid way of expressing the scene you presented.

Dancing Applause Dancing Applause You beat me to it!.

"Akimbo" allows the limbs to be going any-which-way. "Spreadeagled" is a specific, splayed-out form, and might not even indicate a problem.


[image not available]



[image not available]
jmacann
Posted: Monday, October 10, 2011 1:04:57 PM
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I do not think it is the case -so, perhaps, his legs stretched out.
marcin.k
Posted: Tuesday, October 11, 2011 3:01:09 AM
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Hello.
Thank you all for answers.
I like the word akimbo.
However I thik. What I wanted is:
His skis run apart. (or his legs went awry)
Consider you are sport reporter and you describe post fact the run of skier.
He started very good. His speed was quite perfect. He could win.
But suddently in the middle of the trail his skis run apart and he fell.
Tha fall was dangerous but eventually nothing happened to him.
leonAzul
Posted: Tuesday, October 11, 2011 3:18:34 AM

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marcin.k wrote:
Hello.
Thank you all for answers.
I like the word akimbo.
However I thik. What I wanted is:
His skis run apart. (or his legs went awry)
Consider you are sport reporter and you describe post fact the run of skier.
He started very good. His speed was quite perfect. He could win.
But suddently in the middle of the trail his skis run apart and he fell.
Tha fall was dangerous but eventually nothing happened to him.


I believe the word you are looking for here is "But suddenly, in the middle of the piste, his skis drifted apart."
marcin.k
Posted: Tuesday, October 11, 2011 3:45:02 AM
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leonAzul wrote:

I believe the word you are looking for here is "But suddenly, in the middle of the piste, his skis drifted apart."

Thank you.
leonAzul
Posted: Tuesday, October 11, 2011 4:06:25 AM

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marcin.k wrote:
leonAzul wrote:

I believe the word you are looking for here is "But suddenly, in the middle of the piste, his skis drifted apart."

Thank you.


You are welcome.

It helps that in the days of my youth I was a skiing enthusiast, and these are the words that I and my cohort would have used to describe such a circumstance.

The only other suggestion I would make is that if you wish to refer to ski-jumping in particular, the word "chute" would be better than "piste", although if the separation occurred mid-air, then "vault", or "jump" would be more appropriate.
marcin.k
Posted: Tuesday, October 11, 2011 4:08:53 AM
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leonAzul wrote:

It helps that in the days of my youth I was a skiing enthusiast, and these are the words that I and my cohort would have used to describe such a circumstance.

Good!. I believe you're good skier now.
leonAzul
Posted: Tuesday, October 11, 2011 4:13:25 AM

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marcin.k wrote:
leonAzul wrote:

It helps that in the days of my youth I was a skiing enthusiast, and these are the words that I and my cohort would have used to describe such a circumstance.

Good!. I believe you're good skier now.


Then was then, and now is now. ;-)
excaelis
Posted: Tuesday, October 11, 2011 5:52:08 PM

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Splayed might be apposite, and is close enough to spayed to be sniggerworthy.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, October 12, 2011 5:09:34 AM

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Ouch! Sick Sick
MGmirkin
Posted: Wednesday, October 12, 2011 3:53:49 PM
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Well, one could certainly use "did the splits," it would seem to me... Something of a colloquial expression more than a single word.

Used figuratively (since "doing the splits" is *usually* intentional) since it's an unintentional thing, I'd think it would work?

'Akimbo' could be used, though not as exactly. As others said that's more of random orientations or a confused/disorderly state of directions.

Hmm, upon looking up akimbo, apparently I've actually heard it used very, very wrong... It's actually:

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/akimbo

"1. Placed in such a way as to have the hands on the hips and the elbows bowed outward.
2. Being in a bent, bowed, or arched position."

"Topsy-turvy" would be closer to the "jumbled / confused orientations & directions" of body parts.

"Spread eagle" would be similar, though perhaps not exact either, since I think that involves the arms being splayed as well.

Hey, there's the 'single' word. Splayed.

v.tr. 1: "To spread (the limbs, for example) out or apart, especially clumsily."

So, yeah, either "splayed" or "did the splits" would probably work.

Best,
~MG

edit: I see Excaelis beat me to splayed. Good on ya'.

Examples:

"The skier went over the jump, but missed his landing and did the splits, much to his own chagrin."

"The skier went over the jump, but missed his landing and his legs splayed as his skis went in opposite directions. It was painful to watch. A week or two later, he was out of the hospital."

"The skier went over the jump spread eagle to impress his girlfriend, but missed his landing and tumbled down the slope head-over-heels, legs and arms all topsy-turvy."
Romany
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 12:27:40 AM
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McGirkin -

My Bible (The Oxford) gives: akimbo (adverb)

1. with hands on the hips and elbows turned outwards:she stood with arms akimbo, frowning at the small boy
2.(with reference to limbs) flung out widely or haphazardly:he collapsed on the bed , legs akimbo

Have never heard the bent or bowed usage. Must be another AE/BE thing.
Klaas V
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 3:44:31 AM

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Wikimedia are valuable sources to see what with arms akimbo means

MGmirkin
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 10:17:21 PM
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Romany wrote:
MGmirkin -

My Bible (The Oxford) gives: akimbo (adverb)

1. with hands on the hips and elbows turned outwards:she stood with arms akimbo, frowning at the small boy
2.(with reference to limbs) flung out widely or haphazardly:he collapsed on the bed , legs akimbo

Have never heard the bent or bowed usage. Must be another AE/BE thing.


Okay, I guess TheFreeDictionary must just have the single definition then. Glad to know I'm not crazy. Will mentally put akimbo back into confused/jumbled directions pile and add the 'Superman pose.' (Hands on hips, elbows out, legs apart[, head turned to the side, red & blue spandex, cape flapping in the breeze].) ;o)

Honestly, the confused/jumbled version was the only way I could recall having heard it used. Though maybe I'd totally misheard it. :) Hate learning years later that I've been misusing a word.
MGmirkin
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2011 10:20:10 PM
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In any event, I'd probably go with splayed for the original inquiry, if they're looking for a single word for doing the splits on a landing. ;)
Romany
Posted: Friday, October 14, 2011 10:13:42 PM
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McGirkin - I have observed, over time, that the TFD reflects mostly American English and, as such, is a valuable tool for those of us not so familiar with AE.

So perhaps, as I said, the 'akimbo' thing is used exclusively in America for the upper limbs. In which case you haven't been wrong at all!
marcin.k
Posted: Monday, October 17, 2011 3:10:46 AM
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Ok.
I thik "splayed" or "drifted apart" sounds ok.
Briton
Posted: Monday, October 17, 2011 11:28:45 AM
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In my ignorance of skiing, I would have used "scissored", although that suggests that the legs did return to their normal position: an occurrence one would hope happened sooner rather than later. Sick

I like "splayed".
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