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Lying out - meaning Options
Born Villain
Posted: Wednesday, December 4, 2019 11:38:42 AM

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This is from C.S. Lewis' The Voyage of the Dawn Treader of his The Chronicles of Narnia book series:

Up aloft, the sailors were lying out along the yard trying to get control of the sail.

What does 'lying out' mean in this case? What were the sailors doing?
NancyUK
Posted: Wednesday, December 4, 2019 11:52:31 AM
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Edit: the yard or yardarm is a horizontal spar which supports a square sail, as I understand it. The sailors on big sailing ships had to climb into the rigging and manage the sails.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, December 4, 2019 11:56:24 AM

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The yard is the spar that the sail hangs from. Normally you work relatively upright but you might have to lie almost flat. to lie out full-length across the yard.




















Kirill Vorobyov
Posted: Thursday, December 5, 2019 4:28:21 AM

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I've always admired these people who were doing this.

And they sailed for thousands miles, having to make all this effort all along.

Thanks for the pictures, Thar and Nancy.
Born Villain
Posted: Thursday, December 5, 2019 7:44:22 AM

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Thank you both for explaining and providing the pictures! Now I get what it means.
Romany
Posted: Thursday, December 5, 2019 1:34:33 PM
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Born Villain -

Are you enjoying 'Dawn Trader'?

I adored it! I was very young when I first read it - and probably didn't understand every single word. Yet that was the first writing by Lewis I had then come across, and it absorbed me. But the big co-incidence is that, just a couple of weeks ago I picked up a new copy (my own copy having been destroyed some years back in a fire). And am enjoying it all over again.

I wonder - does the "magic" of his writing come through when you read it as a foreign language? Or is it just a kind of unremarkable foreign book?

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