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tall, charming, smart Options
navi
Posted: Wednesday, November 27, 2019 4:13:30 PM
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Which are correct:

1) He was tall, charming.
2) He felt happy, strong.


3) He was tall, charming, smart.
4) He felt happy, strong, hopeful.

Gratefully,
Navi
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, November 27, 2019 5:35:44 PM
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When there are only two descriptors we don't use commas, we join them with "and".

He was tall and charming.
He felt happy and strong.

It's only when there are three descriptors that we use the commas, and in 3 & 4.

To use more than 3 descriptors is "bad" English...people tend to stop listening/reading. They totally forget what the noun is that's being described!

An opinion on the word "smart". Over the last couple of years this word has been "done to death" (an idiom meaning 'used too much').

It's a very ambiguous kind of word, inexact, and rather childish too. In AE I think it only means "clever". Or perhaps "intelligent"? But in other English-speaking countries it also means "stylish", "well-groomed".(Not to mention "stinging") So unless they know it's an AE speaker speaking, people have to read on a bit to see which is meant - sometimes they never find out!

It's not common to comment on a person's intelligence but, if you really want to make this kind of a comment there are so many words you can use - and they are words that give some idea of in which way he is "smart".

She's clever,
intelligent,
witty,
well-educated,
scholarly,
wise,
skilled,
gifted,
accomplished,
academic,
canny,
astute,
learned,
inventive,
shrewd,
capable,
proficient,
crafty,
wily,
cunning,
knowing,
sly,
profound,
deep,
shrewd,
able,

Those are off the top of my head (with maybe a bit of help from the middle of my head), but I expect there are lots more which can be added. And each one has it's own meaning to explain in which field or direction this person is clever. (clever with their hands, clever with book-learning, clever with paint effects, clever with getting people's attention, clever at fooling people). Not all meanings are complimentary - many bad people are very intelligent,


Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, November 27, 2019 5:45:21 PM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
But “He was tall, charming and smart “ could also be description of how well a person presented themselves in British English, clean, tidy well dressed and groomed.

Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Wednesday, November 27, 2019 5:46:35 PM

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If you were going to list 3 descriptors anyway, you would write it as follows.

3) He was tall, charming, and smart.
4) He felt happy, strong, and hopeful.

And the next bicker-match will be concerning the second comma in each of those sentences.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, November 27, 2019 10:32:20 PM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Sarries - it looks like we cross-posted! Sorry.
pjharvey
Posted: Thursday, November 28, 2019 2:55:47 AM
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Joined: 4/13/2012
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Wilmar (USA) wrote:
If you were going to list 3 descriptors anyway, you would write it as follows.

3) He was tall, charming, and smart.
4) He felt happy, strong, and hopeful.

And the next bicker-match will be concerning the second comma in each of those sentences.



Exactly!

Just to let readers know that your use of the comma is American English, Romany's is British English.
Romany
Posted: Thursday, November 28, 2019 7:19:50 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 17,423
Neurons: 56,086
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

And also: on a Forum such as TFD, when people talk about the English language; and people who speak different English dialects (Australian, American, Indian etc) and at different levels of English all contribute, it's not called "to bicker" (which is to argue and strive to be "right"). It's "to discuss".

It's the whole point of having a forum such as this. And a really great way for learners to learn more about expressing themselves in English.

No two people ever think exactly the same. But if you go through life thinking that anyone who doesn't think exactly the same as you do is being insulting, or personal, you'd be in for a pretty miserable life-journey!Dancing
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