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The waitress came round ... Options
onsen
Posted: Monday, November 25, 2019 9:44:34 AM
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Joined: 9/14/2017
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Hello,

Quote:

The waitress came round with a tray of mouth-watering cream cakes.
(Longman Language Activator)


round
adv
53. to a specific place: she came round to see me.
TFD



Does the 'round' in the sentence mean 53.?
That is, to where the customer was.


Thank you.
thar
Posted: Monday, November 25, 2019 10:10:57 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
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close, but this is slightly different.

" come round to someone's house" is a specific idiomatic meaning. It really has nothing to do with the standard meaning of 'round'.

But the waitress came round means she served all the people in the room, by moving around the room.
She didn't just come to you. She served the people on your right, then you, then the people on your left, and so on until she had served everybody.



ie she starts at one end of the table and goes up one side then back down the other side. Or if people are just standing talking to each other, or at different tables, then she goes from one person to the other, and the natural way to do that is to start at one place and gradually move along one side of the room, then the next, until you end up where you started.



onsen
Posted: Monday, November 25, 2019 10:26:44 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/14/2017
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Thank you very much, thar, for your explanation.
FounDit
Posted: Monday, November 25, 2019 11:21:43 AM

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Here is another slight difference between AmE and BrE. In the U.S., we use "around" in place of "round", but the "a" is sometimes difficult to hear.
thermoer
Posted: Sunday, December 8, 2019 12:45:57 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 8/9/2019
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round or around. just eat the a
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, December 8, 2019 5:17:24 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,427
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
FounDit wrote:
Here is another slight difference between AmE and BrE. In the U.S., we use "around" in place of "round", but the "a" is sometimes difficult to hear.

I would also use "the waitress came around" - the same way that thar wrote "by moving around the room".

I had never noticed that I make a distinction!

However, there definitely IS a difference in the "he came round to my house"/"he came around to my house" usage.
The British and the American dictionaries seem to have both definitions, but the 'common usage' is different. British English tends to (for no reason that I can see) use these words to show the 'causativeness' or 'purposefulness' of the movement.
In British English, to "walk around" or "travel around" or "wander around" are mostly use to describe a rather aimless random movement - whereas "come round", "walk round" describe a purposeful action.
around adv
5a. To or among various places; here and there
round adv
3. To a specific place or person:

American Heritage

***************
A waitress walking around a room with a tray of drinks would follow a "Brownian" path - a yard forwards, a yard to the left, a yard diagonally back and left, a yard forwards, a yard to the right, a yard diagonally forwards to the left . . .



A waitress walking round the room would follow the path shown in thar's diagram.

***************
I agree with thermoer - just eat the cream-cakes!Dancing
onsen
Posted: Sunday, December 8, 2019 9:38:32 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/14/2017
Posts: 792
Neurons: 8,464
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Here is another slight difference between AmE and BrE. In the U.S., we use "around" in place of "round", but the "a" is sometimes difficult to hear.

I would also use "the waitress came around" - the same way that thar wrote "by moving around the room".

I had never noticed that I make a distinction!

However, there definitely IS a difference in the "he came round to my house"/"he came around to my house" usage.
The British and the American dictionaries seem to have both definitions, but the 'common usage' is different. British English tends to (for no reason that I can see) use these words to show the 'causativeness' or 'purposefulness' of the movement.
In British English, to "walk around" or "travel around" or "wander around" are mostly use to describe a rather aimless random movement - whereas "come round", "walk round" describe a purposeful action.
around adv
5a. To or among various places; here and there
round adv
3. To a specific place or person:

American Heritage

***************
A waitress walking around a room with a tray of drinks would follow a "Brownian" path - a yard forwards, a yard to the left, a yard diagonally back and left, a yard forwards, a yard to the right, a yard diagonally forwards to the left . . .



A waitress walking round the room would follow the path shown in thar's diagram.

***************
I agree with thermoer - just eat the cream-cakes!Dancing



Thank you very much, Drag0nspeaker, for your reply.

Quote:

around adv, prep
3 in or to many places or parts of an area SYN about BrE:

He wandered around the streets, looking in shop windows.
When I finished college, I travelled around for a while.


(LONGMAN Exams Dictionary)


I suppose the two italicized sentences are in American English.

In British English, they would be:
He wandered about the streets, looking in shop windows.
When I finished college, I travelled about for a while.

Am I right?





Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, December 8, 2019 10:11:29 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,427
Neurons: 228,163
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi!
Actually, in British English, you could use "around" or "about" - but "around" is more common when a location is named.

He wandered around the streets, looking in shop windows.
When I finished college, I travelled around for a while.
He wandered about, looking in shop windows.
He wandered around, looking in shop windows.
When I finished college, I travelled about for a while.


He wandered about the streets, looking in shop windows. - rather unlikely.
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