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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English marks 'wink' as transitive Options
A cooperator
Posted: Saturday, November 9, 2019 12:36:00 PM

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Joined: 10/27/2011
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Location: Seiyun, Hadramawt, Yemen
Hi Everyone!
If the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English makes so big a mistake like marking the ordinary intransitive verb "wink" as "intransitive"/transitive", then what will a non-native learner of English do?

The girl that is winking to the camera is my classmate.
When she winked at me, I knew she liked me.

Audiendus
Posted: Saturday, November 9, 2019 8:50:43 PM
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Location: London, England, United Kingdom
"To wink an eye" is transitive. I suggest you check some other dictionaries.
sureshot
Posted: Saturday, November 9, 2019 11:40:39 PM
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A cooperator wrote:
Hi Everyone!
If the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English makes so big a mistake like marking the ordinary intransitive verb "wink" as "intransitive"/transitive", then what will a non-native learner of English do?


_____________________

It is not correct to say that Longman Dictionary has made a mistake. Here is the extract from Longman Dictionary:

Image of wink [intransitive, transitive] to close and open one eye quickly to communicate something or show that something is a secret or joke
wink at He winked mischievously at Erica.
He winked an eye at his companion.

COMMENT: The dictionary has mentioned one example each for the two functions of the verb. The second sentence "He winked an eye at his companion" is an example of "wink" functioning as a transitive verb. Essentially, "wink" when used as a transitive verb conveys two meanings (1)to cause to open and shut (2)to convey or express (a signal or the like) by so doing.

Some example sentences showing the transitive function of "wink" are:

- She winked an eye at me and I got the hint to make my next move.
- He winked his approval and she placed a bet on the black horse.
- She was chained and her mouth was tightly taped; all she could do was wink her right eye to convey that she understood my message.
- He winked his assent and I signed the contract.
- He winked an eye at his companion and said to Steve: "Been to the pictures, haven't we, Mike?'
- The bishops sanctioned or winked their eyes at various modifications which were sensible and did not mind that they were illegal.
- Seeing my puzzled look he winked an eye and said,"Well, I must admit that it makes a good story; I'm pleased with your scooping".


However, I agree that "wink" is commonly used intransitively. This has apparently caused you some problems.

A cooperator
Posted: Sunday, November 10, 2019 8:26:02 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 3,818
Neurons: 14,707
Location: Seiyun, Hadramawt, Yemen
sureshot wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
Hi Everyone!
If the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English makes so big a mistake like marking the ordinary intransitive verb "wink" as "intransitive"/transitive", then what will a non-native learner of English do?


_____________________

It is not correct to say that Longman Dictionary has made a mistake. Here is the extract from Longman Dictionary:

Image of wink [intransitive, transitive] to close and open one eye quickly to communicate something or show that something is a secret or joke
wink at He winked mischievously at Erica.
He winked an eye at his companion.

COMMENT: The dictionary has mentioned one example each for the two functions of the verb. The second sentence "He winked an eye at his companion" is an example of "wink" functioning as a transitive verb. Essentially, "wink" when used as a transitive verb conveys two meanings (1)to cause to open and shut (2)to convey or express (a signal or the like) by so doing.
However, I agree that "wink" is commonly used intransitively. This has apparently caused you some problems.


The fact that I said that Longman Dictionary has made a mistake is I see it explain what 'wink' means with this meaning definition(have a look at the screen shot]:
[the sense #1, Intransitive/Transitive]to close and open one eye quickly, usually to communicate amusement or a secret message: [+at]("Joel winked at me, and I realized he was joking."). [the sense #2, Intransitive] to shine with a light that flashes on and off: ("the winking lights of buoys out to sea")

From the above explained meaning no #1[to close and open one eye...], I understand and see that 'twink' is only explained to only be used transitively:
He winked an eye at me.
He winked his assent and I signed the contract.



No, it's not due to that "wink" is commonly used intransitively has apparently caused me some problems. But, the faced problem is about the tip (definition note) "to close and open one eye quickly, usually to communicate amusement or a secret message" sounds like the definition of sense of the transitive verb 'wink', not of the intransitive verb 'wink'.
The definition should have omitted the word "eye", or put it in parentheses to cover both intransitive and transitive uses.
"to close and open quickly, usually to communicate amusement or a secret message" or "to close and open (one eye) quickly, usually to communicate amusement or a secret message"


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