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Re-primarisation Options
alibey1917
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 5:49:35 AM

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"In Latin America and Africa, the two largest concentrations of mining frenzy, this shift has been called the ‘re-primarisation’ of global capitalism. Remarkably, it means that exports of extracted and mined resources are becoming more important to the wider economic for-tunes of such places (not less, as traditional models of development would have it)."

What does "re-primarisation" in this context, I couldn't find it (or the verb "primarise") in any English dictionary.


"The source: Vertical by Stephen Graham
Blodybeef
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 6:32:11 AM

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Mayhaps it is a variant of the word "primary".

re-primarisation
again-firstification

a return to the primary

A return to the basics

An economy model led by the primary raw material providers rather than end users or consumeres.

It may be a revese function of consumerism?

maybe?
alibey1917
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 7:44:16 AM

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Blodybeef yazdı:
Mayhaps it is a variant of the word "primary".

re-primarisation
again-firstification

a return to the primary

A return to the basics

An economy model led by the primary raw material providers rather than end users or consumeres.

It may be a revese function of consumerism?

maybe?

Thank you, Blodybeef, I got it.
Romany
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 12:49:24 PM
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Alibey - if you read the passage carefully, the word is used and then explained: -

"... it means that exports of extracted and mined resources are becoming more important to the wider economic for-tunes of such places ..."(i.e. Latin America and Africa).

Was "for-tunes" also confusing you? It's just a typo and should have been written "fortunes".

What I know about the mining industry could be written on the back of a postage stamp, but would imagine that the word "re-primarisation" is a jargon word used only in the mining community. Unless that is your field, I wouldn't worry about it. Every industry, craft, business, science, field, academic discipline, has their own jargon and it would be impossible to become familiar with them all. Thus, after using a jargon word it is usually "translated" for the general reader as has been done here.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 2:46:55 PM

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Romany wrote:
Alibey - if you read the passage carefully, the word is used and then explained: -

"... it means that exports of extracted and mined resources are becoming more important to the wider economic for-tunes of such places ..."(i.e. Latin America and Africa).

Was "for-tunes" also confusing you? It's just a typo and should have been written "fortunes".

What I know about the mining industry could be written on the back of a postage stamp, but would imagine that the word "re-primarisation" is a jargon word used only in the mining community. Unless that is your field, I wouldn't worry about it. Every industry, craft, business, science, field, academic discipline, has their own jargon and it would be impossible to become familiar with them all. Thus, after using a jargon word it is usually "translated" for the general reader as has been done here.


Romany I never heard it when I was studying how to calculate the yield of a mine or how to identify minerals in a rock sample using reflective and refractive light.
I think Stephen Graham has a “flowery” use of English in his writing.
thar
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 3:08:46 PM

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I agree, I think this is an economics point, not a mining one. And I think 'this means...' is a consequence of this change, not an explanation of the term.

It is hard to know without the context previous to this bit - does 'of' mean that global capitalising is putting mining back at the top of importance, or does it mean that mining is doing something to capitalism? I assume it is global capitalism that is making mining a priority again. [It is a primary industry by definition, whether it is booming or failing]. And how on earth that fits in with the whole 'vertical' idea - very deep holes in the ground? Most modern mining seems to involve just scraping big pits. Very big, deep, pits - but still holes, not shafts. That or scraping the tops of mountains. Maybe that is his point - build the sky-scrapers ever higher in the cities, and elsewhere and scrape off the mountains and fill the valleys with the mining waste, to end up with a flattened out landscape! The extinction of the vertical! Whistle


I have come to the conclusion he is not just quirky - his choice of words is so obfuscating it just becomes bad writing.
WeaselADAPT
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 5:36:13 PM

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Location: Kentwood, Michigan, United States
alibey1917 wrote:
"In Latin America and Africa, the two largest concentrations of mining frenzy, this shift has been called the ‘re-primarisation’ of global capitalism. Remarkably, it means that exports of extracted and mined resources are becoming more important to the wider economic for-tunes of such places (not less, as traditional models of development would have it)."

What does "re-primarisation" in this context, I couldn't find it (or the verb "primarise") in any English dictionary.

"The source: Vertical by Stephen Graham


Hi, Ali.

There is an article on TheFreeDictionary.com on "-ization" (and "-isation," for those of the British English persuasion) that reminds us that this suffix means, "the act of making or creating." The example provided is "colonization" – simplified to, the act of making/creating/establishing colonies.

From this alone, I would conclude that "re-primarisation" means "to make primary, again" or "to return [something] to a state of preeminence." The "again" and "return to" references the prefix, "re-" at the beginning of the mystery word.

Therefore, some "shift," which must be discussed in the text preceding this passage, "has been called 'the return [or returning] of global capitalism to a state of preeminence.'" The second sentence, then, refers to the effects of this shift.

This may not be exactly right, but I am confident it's close.

I hope this helps.

the Weasel
WeaselWorks Freelance Editing
alibey1917
Posted: Saturday, October 12, 2019 6:18:44 AM

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Joined: 9/19/2018
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Thank you, friends, I understood it.
alibey1917
Posted: Saturday, October 12, 2019 6:21:06 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2018
Posts: 229
Neurons: 5,120
WeaselADAPT yazdı:
alibey1917 yazdı:
"In Latin America and Africa, the two largest concentrations of mining frenzy, this shift has been called the ‘re-primarisation’ of global capitalism. Remarkably, it means that exports of extracted and mined resources are becoming more important to the wider economic for-tunes of such places (not less, as traditional models of development would have it)."

What does "re-primarisation" in this context, I couldn't find it (or the verb "primarise") in any English dictionary.

"The source: Vertical by Stephen Graham


Hi, Ali.

There is an article on TheFreeDictionary.com on "-ization" (and "-isation," for those of the British English persuasion) that reminds us that this suffix means, "the act of making or creating." The example provided is "colonization" – simplified to, the act of making/creating/establishing colonies.

From this alone, I would conclude that "re-primarisation" means "to make primary, again" or "to return [something] to a state of preeminence." The "again" and "return to" references the prefix, "re-" at the beginning of the mystery word.

Therefore, some "shift," which must be discussed in the text preceding this passage, "has been called 'the return [or returning] of global capitalism to a state of preeminence.'" The second sentence, then, refers to the effects of this shift.

This may not be exactly right, but I am confident it's close.

I hope this helps.

the Weasel
WeaselWorks Freelance Editing


Hi and thank you, WeaselADAPT, It's been really helpful.
WeaselADAPT
Posted: Saturday, October 12, 2019 12:59:27 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/6/2014
Posts: 330
Neurons: 61,189
Location: Kentwood, Michigan, United States
alibey1917 wrote:
Hi and thank you, WeaselADAPT, It's been really helpful.


You're very welcome. I'm happy to help.

the Weasel
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