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Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 12:00:00 AM
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Joined: 3/7/2009
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Location: Inside Farlex computers
horologist

(noun) Someone who makes or repairs watches.

Synonyms: watchmaker

Usage: My neighbor, Paula, is an amateur horologist, so she may be able to figure out why your watch has stopped.
WeaselADAPT
Posted: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 1:17:12 AM

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Joined: 11/6/2014
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Location: Kentwood, Michigan, United States
A hidden clue?

hor = hour
taurine
Posted: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 3:34:33 AM

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Joined: 4/20/2016
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Location: South Dublin, Ireland
The Spirits alight and seek airily for someone, finally ascend the tower and discover the Horologist asleep.
KSPavan
Posted: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 3:53:40 AM

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Joined: 1/28/2015
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Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India

Word of the Day
?
horologist
Definition: (noun) Someone who makes or repairs watches.
Synonyms: watchmaker
Usage: My neighbor, Paula, is an amateur horologist, so she may be able to figure out why your watch has stopped.
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 4:12:27 AM

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Joined: 5/1/2017
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Location: Casablanca, Grand Casablanca, Morocco
Horology

Horology is the scientific study of time. Specifically, horology involves the measurement of time and the making of clocks.

You need a small leap of imagination to see the hour in horology, but if you do, you've pretty much nailed the meaning: it refers to the study of time and the art of making timepieces. In horology, time is studied scientifically, just as a geologist studies the earth and a biologist studies life. Horology is very practical since it involves the design and construction of clocks, watches, and other devices for measuring time. Someone who studies horology is a horologist.
Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 10:49:53 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/4/2015
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Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States

Definition: (noun) Someone who makes or repairs watches.
Synonyms: watchmaker
Usage: My neighbor, Paula, is an amateur horologist, so she may be able to figure out why your watch has stopped.
Nelson Taylor Sol
Posted: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 10:52:33 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 10/8/2019
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Neurons: 3
Unless Paula self-identified, it would be extremely rare to come across a female horologist.
8BooksOfSengathe
Posted: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 2:13:31 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/30/2014
Posts: 511
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Daemon wrote:
horologist

(noun) Someone who makes or repairs watches.

Synonyms: watchmaker

Usage: My neighbor, Paula, is an amateur horologist, so she may be able to figure out why your watch has stopped.




The local horologist benefited a multi-generational family
by repairing an antique time piece , a discontinued designer's
watch and an electronic watch with a broken band.

C185445
Posted: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 2:13:49 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/22/2017
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Neurons: 301,259
Location: Camarma de Esteruelas, Madrid, Spain
Best word in English ever.

Dancing Dancing Dancing Dancing Dancing Dancing Dancing Dancing Dancing Dancing Dancing Dancing Dancing Dancing Dancing Dancing Dancing
thar
Posted: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 4:02:43 PM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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Hora is an interesting word because the meaning changes as the technology of timing becomes more accurate

Proto-Indo-European *yeh₁- (“year, season”).
Ancient Greek ὥρα (hṓra, “time, season, year”)
Latin hōra f (genitive hōrae);hour; time; o'clock; season; time of year

Then the Church, with its regulation of prayers by time, drove the idea of division of the day into hours.

It gets not only into Romance languages but into Germanic ones as well - German Uhr, Dutch uur.

In English the Norman French and Latin probably both contributed to the English 'hour'.

The words it replaced were the Germanic stund and tide.

(in German, I think Stunde is the 60 minutes and Uhr is the time, o'clock)
That never caught on in English, except in the 24 hour clock
Neuf heures; neun Uhr, but nine o'clock. [ twenty-one hundred hours]

But those words have been pushed aside or found a niche meaning in English
stund exists only in dialects
Quote:


Old English

From Proto-Germanic *stundō (“point in time, hour”), from Proto-Indo-European *stut- (“prop”), from Proto-Indo-European *stā-, *sth- (“to stand”); cognate with Old Saxon stunda, Old High German stunta, Old Norse stund.

stund f (nominative plural stunda or stunde)

time, while
Nó ic ða stunde bemearn, ne for wunde weóp — At the time, I mourned not, nor for the wounded wept.
A period of time, an hour; specifically, a division of the day probably equivalent to about three hours

[edit - 3 hours matches the Old Norse timekeeping system of splitting the day evenly, with fixed lenghts whether it is dark or light, rather than the Christian system of splitting daylight into a fixed number of hours, so they get longer and shorter depending on the season]


Adverb
stund

at once, forthwith, immediately
Hé word stunde áhóf — He brought up the word forthwith.
Derived terms
orlegstund f. — time of adversity
stundmǣlum adv. — from time to time, gradually: time after time, alternately.
stundum adv. — from time to time, at times; with effort, laboriously, eagerly, fiercely
winterstund f. — winter-hour, short time
woruldstund f. — life in this world, sojourn upon earth





But it does survive in English in dialect, particularly Scots, where the Normans language didn't penetrate

Quote:
Alternative forms
stund, stoind, stoond, stoon, stoun, stuind (Scotland)
Noun
stound (plural stounds)

(chronology, obsolete or dialectal) An hour.
(obsolete) A tide, season.
(archaic or dialectal) A time, length of time, hour, while.
(archaic or dialectal) A brief span of time, moment, instant.
Listen to me a little stound.
A moment or instance of urgency; exigence.
(dialectal) A sharp or sudden pain; a shock, an attack.


That meaning of 'a while' is the same in Icelandic. Stund is a while, an indeterminate amount of time. Or an hour. But if you want to specify the modern '60 minutes' then klukkustund or klukkutími.


and of course tide becomes time, (eventide, Yuletide) and the regular timings of sea rising and falling. And news (glad tidings).
But tide as time was lost in Middle English.

So English ends up with a mixture of 60 minutes like the Latin hora; time like the Norse o'clock (klukkan níu - nine o'clock); dialectal stound for a moment; and the two-tier system:

technical or posh term horologist
common term clock-maker/watchmaker
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