mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
Don't let us rejoice in punishment, even when the hand of God alone inflicts it. The best of us are but poor wretches, just... Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, September 28, 2011 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 33,204
Neurons: 98,790
Location: Inside Farlex computers
Don't let us rejoice in punishment, even when the hand of God alone inflicts it. The best of us are but poor wretches, just saved from shipwreck: can we feel anything but awe and pity when we see a fellow-passenger swallowed by the waves?

George Eliot (1819-1880)
kitten
Posted: Thursday, September 29, 2011 4:22:14 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/28/2009
Posts: 2,463
Neurons: 7,420
Location: the city by the bay
Daemon wrote:
Don't let us rejoice in punishment, even when the hand of God alone inflicts it. The best of us are but poor wretches, just saved from shipwreck: can we feel anything but awe and pity when we see a fellow-passenger swallowed by the waves?

George Eliot (1819-1880)



The above quote in context comes from Scenes of Clerical Life by George Eliot--1858--Book 3--Chapter 22. The story was orginally published in 1858 in Blackwood's Magazine. The first edition of the novel was published in 1910 after she passed away.


His mind was occupied in this way as he was absently taking off his gown, when Mr. Landor startled him by entering the vestry and asking abruptly, 'Have you heard the news about Dempster?'

'No,' said Mr. Tryan, anxiously; 'what is it?'

'He has been thrown out of his gig in the Bridge Way, and he was taken up for dead. They were carrying him home as we were coming to church, and I stayed behind to see what I could do. I went in to speak to Mrs. Dempster, and prepare her a little, but she was not at home. Dempster is not dead, however, he was stunned with the fall. Pilgrim came in a few minutes, and he says the right leg is broken in two places. It's likely to be a terrible case, with his state of body. It seems he was more drunk than usual, and they say he came along the Bridge Way flogging his horse like a madman, till at last it gave a sudden wheel, and he was pitched out. The servants said they didn't know where Mrs. Dempster was: she had been away from home since yesterday morning; but Mrs. Raynor knew.'

'I know where she is,' said Mr. Tryan; 'but I think it will be better for her not to be told of this just yet.'

'Ah, that was what Pilgrim said, and so I didn't go round to Mrs. Raynor's. He said it would be all the better if Mrs. Dempster could be kept out of the house for the present. Do you know if anything new has happened between Dempster and his wife lately? I was surprised to hear of her being at Paddiford Church this morning.'

'Yes, something has happened; but I believe she is anxious that the particulars of his behaviour towards her should not be known. She is at Mrs. Pettifer's—there is no reason for concealing that, since what has happened to her husband; and yesterday, when she was in very deep trouble, she sent for me. I was very thankful she did so: I believe a great change of feeling has begun in her. But she is at present in that excitable state of mind—she has been shaken by so many painful emotions during the last two days, that I think it would be better, for this evening at least, to guard her from a new shock, if possible. But I am going now to call upon her, and I shall see how she is.'

'Mr. Tryan,' said Mr. Jerome, who had entered during the dialogue, and had been standing by, listening with a distressed face, 'I shall take it as a favour if you'll let me know if iver there's anything I can do for Mrs. Dempster. Eh, dear, what a world this is! I think I see 'em fifteen year ago—as happy a young couple as iver was; and now, what it's all come to! I was in a hurry, like, to punish Dempster for pessecutin', but there was a stronger hand at work nor mine.'

'Yes, Mr. Jerome; but don't let us rejoice in punishment, even when the hand of God alone inflicts it. The best of us are but poor wretches just saved from shipwreck: can we feel anything but awe and pity when we see a fellow-passenger swallowed by the waves?'

'Right, right, Mr. Tryan. I'm over hot and hasty, that I am. But I beg on you to tell Mrs. Dempster—I mean, in course, when you've an opportunity—tell her she's a friend at the White House as she may send for any hour o' the day.'



Please thank Wikiquotes for the above in context.


peace out, >^,,^<
floyd
Posted: Thursday, September 29, 2011 11:16:52 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/22/2011
Posts: 137
Neurons: 411
Location: United States
As always, thank you for digging up the context. Is there really a way to "thank Wikiquotes"?

I'm having a hard time sorting out the characters here, since Mr. Tryan, who seems a little priggish, is the one cautioning Mr. Jerome with such apparent sensitivity.

As for George Eliot, do you think she's using a little irony when she says that Mrs. Dempster "is at present in that excitable state of mind"? Today, I would think of that as a sexist characterization; am I reading to much of the present into the past? I can't remember whether Eliot was at all a feminist in her writings.

Finally, thanks Daemon, for picking another Eliot quote. If reminds me again that I want to read Middlemarch.

floyd
DHeavyOne
Posted: Thursday, September 29, 2011 5:39:49 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/6/2009
Posts: 124
Neurons: 378
Location: Canada; Ontario; Collingwood
All I can seem to concentrate on after reading this quote from Georgie is the song running through my head....


"Amaaaazing Grace! ....how sweeeeet the sound.....that saaaaaved a wreeeetch like MEEEEEEEE!...."


Mike
kitten
Posted: Thursday, September 29, 2011 6:53:35 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/28/2009
Posts: 2,463
Neurons: 7,420
Location: the city by the bay
floyd wrote:
As always, thank you for digging up the context. Is there really a way to "thank Wikiquotes"?

I'm having a hard time sorting out the characters here, since Mr. Tryan, who seems a little priggish, is the one cautioning Mr. Jerome with such apparent sensitivity.

As for George Eliot, do you think she's using a little irony when she says that Mrs. Dempster "is at present in that excitable state of mind"? Today, I would think of that as a sexist characterization; am I reading to much of the present into the past? I can't remember whether Eliot was at all a feminist in her writings.

Finally, thanks Daemon, for picking another Eliot quote. If reminds me again that I want to read Middlemarch.

floyd



Hello,

I thank what ever site I get my information from. In answer to your question regarding wikiquotes yes there is a way to thank them one just needs to read their site. Anxious

I too wondered about the " in that excitable state of mind" comment.

Is she "in that excitable state of mind?" or is she "in that excitable state of mind?"

Either way it sounded to me as a put down or questioning of this womans character.Eh? Think One in that time period would have lent itself to the "laudanam morphia state of mind" aka "celery tonic" health treatment for excitable ladies. Shhh Silenced


peace out, >^,,^<
RubyMoon
Posted: Thursday, September 29, 2011 11:46:38 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/30/2009
Posts: 1,663
Neurons: 4,834
Location: United States
I dunno, floyd--

I'm stuck on the name Mrs. Dempster... I keep reading Mrs. Dumpster and it distracts me from puzzling out what the heck they're all getting at.
Nonetheless, this quotation seems to convey the same sentiment with or without context (my opinion, that's all).

The issue you bring up doesn't relate to the quotation--- you wonder about that excitable state of mind--- is it a sexist remark...

Not to me, no, it isn't sexist. If I am reading a novel, then I just take "it" as part of the story and the author's "decision" to present the story as she chooses... if the author means it to be sexist, then who cares? I think I'd have to read the entire novel though to absorb the overall mood&such.

If my employer were to say to me You're in that excitable state of mind...then I'd ask for clarification, etc.,--it might prove sexist or not.
(In general, I'm not overly affected by sexist remarks.)

(good point to pick up on--I would have glazed right by it) Angel

Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.