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Advice for learning English Vocabulary Options
.vess.
Posted: Wednesday, August 21, 2019 4:33:34 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 8/21/2019
Posts: 4
Neurons: 50
Hi there! I have recently decided to improve my English. I found free stuff in the Internet for Grammar but I can not find nothing useful for improving my Vocabulary. I know the words or they do not seems to be useful. Do you know any site with lists with words(intermediate and upper intermediate)? It will be good if there is an example of usage in a sentence.
The second problem is that I am doing well in understanding English both reading and listening but when I have to express myself, to say something, to write, to translate from my native language to English I have got problems. Example: when I seen word in English I know it, but when I have to reverse from native to English I can not remember the meaning. Why is that? How can I avoid that?
Kampong
Posted: Saturday, August 24, 2019 6:44:21 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 9/30/2017
Posts: 44
Neurons: 60,550
Location: Stavanger, Rogaland, Norway
Hi,
Speaking the language is obviously the easiest way to learn the everyday vocabulary that everyone needs.
Obviously, when speaking you have no time to be fancy, and it is super-easy to say something that is completely corny. That's the way it is.

for a written source to common everyday language, I usually recommend reading crime novels, instead of "high literature". Some terms are hopefully not needed - such as knowing crack, meth, coke.


Good luck.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, August 26, 2019 12:23:07 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,079
Neurons: 222,592
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Kampong wrote:
Hi,
Speaking the language is obviously the easiest way to learn the everyday vocabulary that everyone needs.
Obviously, when speaking you have no time to be fancy, and it is super-easy to say something that is completely corny. That's the way it is.
for a written source to common everyday language, I usually recommend reading crime novels, instead of "high literature". Some terms are hopefully not needed - such as knowing crack, meth, coke.
Good luck.

I agree generally.
Not just crime novels - any novels written in modern English ("historical romances" and science fiction/fantasy sometimes contain words and grammatical structures which are not used in normal life). Many of the "classics", though they are good books, contain outdated vocabulary - Kipling, Dickens, the Bronte Sisters will not help you a lot, because of this.

Welcome to the forum, vess.
Just chatting on this forum will help with your vocabulary.
sufall
Posted: Tuesday, August 27, 2019 5:39:46 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 8/14/2015
Posts: 13
Neurons: 1,110,056
An English teacher of mine once had given us this piece of advice on how to choose books to read: Do not read a book which has more than five words you don't know per page. Well, this was for choosing books to read on summer holidays when I was at pre-intermediate level. (And one could set a different limit for new words per page.)
Now I simply read the book twice - the first time without looking up the words I don't know, trying to guess their meaning from the context; and the second time using a dictionary. This strategy works best with non-fiction; it is not fun reading a crime novel, or any novel, a second time in the same week/month.
Interestingly, I am usually able to guess the meaning of words easily when I am reading a modern novel, but not so much when I am reading a biography or a book on WWII.
Hope this helps...
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